Streamliners

In the 50s, the 6189, 6190 and 6191 Streamliners descended directly from the early ‘50s Electromatic. Along with the lower-priced Clipper they were the primary models shoring up the bottom end of the Gretsch line.

That doesn’t mean they were shoddy guitars, though. The ‘55 to ‘57 Streamliners were built on the exact same body as the 6120 Chet Atkins of the era, and are effectively a single-pickup version, without the tremolo, binding or other frills.

Gretsch didn’t exactly advertise that fact, though, because Streamliners were much cheaper than the 6120 when new. They still are.

With the advent of other low-priced models such as the Anniversaries and the Tennessean in ‘58, the early Streamliner’s days were numbered. It was discontinued in late 1958.

The name, however, returned in the ‘60s. The 6102 and 6103 Streamliners were primarily an attempt to take the perfectly good 6123 Monkees model and make it into something people would want to buy.

In other words, they’re very close to a 6123, minus the Monkee business.

There are, however, a few differences worth noting: Where the 6123 had a unique fretboard with new-classic inlays on both the treble and bass sides of the neck, the 60s Streamliners used the usual bass-side-only setup Gretsch was traditionally known for.

Also, Streamliners moved the pickup and tone switches to the upper bass bout. The 6123 grouped all it’s controls on the treble side.

None In the 50s, the 6189, 6190 and 6191 Streamliners descended directly from the early ‘50s Electromatic. Along with the lower-priced Clipper they were the primary models shoring up the bottom end of the Gretsch line.

That doesn’t mean they were shoddy guitars, though. The ‘55 to ‘57 Streamliners were built on the exact same body as the 6120 Chet Atkins of the era, and are effectively a single-pickup version, without the tremolo, binding or other frills.

Gretsch didn’t exactly advertise that fact, though, because Streamliners were much cheaper than the 6120 when new. They still are.

With the advent of other low-priced models such as the Anniversaries and the Tennessean in ‘58, the early Streamliner’s days were numbered. It was discontinued in late 1958.

The name, however, returned in the ‘60s. The 6102 and 6103 Streamliners were primarily an attempt to take the perfectly good 6123 Monkees model and make it into something people would want to buy.

In other words, they’re very close to a 6123, minus the Monkee business.

There are, however, a few differences worth noting: Where the 6123 had a unique fretboard with new-classic inlays on both the treble and bass sides of the neck, the 60s Streamliners used the usual bass-side-only setup Gretsch was traditionally known for.

Also, Streamliners moved the pickup and tone switches to the upper bass bout. The 6123 grouped all it’s controls on the treble side.

None In the 50s, the 6189, 6190 and 6191 Streamliners descended directly from the early ‘50s Electromatic. Along with the lower-priced Clipper they were the primary models shoring up the bottom end of the Gretsch line.

That doesn’t mean they were shoddy guitars, though. The ‘55 to ‘57 Streamliners were built on the exact same body as the 6120 Chet Atkins of the era, and are effectively a single-pickup version, without the tremolo, binding or other frills.

Gretsch didn’t exactly advertise that fact, though, because Streamliners were much cheaper than the 6120 when new. They still are.

With the advent of other low-priced models such as the Anniversaries and the Tennessean in ‘58, the early Streamliner’s days were numbered. It was discontinued in late 1958.

The name, however, returned in the ‘60s. The 6102 and 6103 Streamliners were primarily an attempt to take the perfectly good 6123 Monkees model and make it into something people would want to buy.

In other words, they’re very close to a 6123, minus the Monkee business.

There are, however, a few differences worth noting: Where the 6123 had a unique fretboard with new-classic inlays on both the treble and bass sides of the neck, the 60s Streamliners used the usual bass-side-only setup Gretsch was traditionally known for.

Also, Streamliners moved the pickup and tone switches to the upper bass bout. The 6123 grouped all it’s controls on the treble side.

None

The Gretsch-GEAR database includes eight different models and 55 examples in the Streamliners family, including Streamliner and Streamliner II models.

Guitar models in the Streamliners group

6102 Streamliner
Documented years: 1968 to 1970

Late '60s/Early 70s model.

6103 Streamliner
Documented years: 1968 to 1973

Cherry-finished late 60s/early 70s model

6189 Streamliner
Documented years: 1954 to 1958

The 6189 Streamliner, with its Bamboo Yellow/Copper Mist finish, is generally considered the most desirable version of the 50s Streamliner series. A Jaguar Tan 6189 was also offered, although it is rarely seen and may have been special-order only. All three Streamliners were descended from the earlier 6190/6191 Electromatic. Much ...

6190 Streamliner
Documented years: 1956 to 1958

The 6190 Streamliner was the sunburst-finished variant of the 50s Streamliner series. All three Streamliners were descended from the earlier 6190/6191 Electromatic. Much like the Country Club name supplanted the Electro II in 1955, the Electromatic became the Streamliner. Very early Streamliner, like Country Clubs, retain the clear plastic knobs ...

6191 Streamliner
Documented years: 1955 to 1958

The 6191 Streamliner was the natural-finished variant of the 50s Streamliner series. All three Streamliners were descended from the earlier 6190/6191 Electromatic. Much like the Country Club name supplanted the Electro II in 1955, the Electromatic became the Streamliner. Very early Streamliner, like Country Clubs, retain the clear plastic knobs ...

7565 Streamliner
Documented years: 1968 to 1973

Sunburst, 70s version

7566 Streamliner
Documented years: 1972 to 1973

Cherry-finished, 1970s version

7667 Streamliner II
Documented years: 1973

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