Gretsch-GEAR Archtop Acoustics 100

1941 Gretsch 100: 2301

Owned by
Windsordave
Body style
Hollowbody (no cutaway)
Color(s)
Natural
Fretboard
Rosewood with Block inlays
Nut
Bone
Pickups
None
Tuners
Grover
Bridge
Rosewood with rosewood adjustable saddle
Tailpiece
Chromatic
Modifications

Other than replacing the worn frets and re-doing the pickguard's binding this guitar is dead original.

I installed a dual gooseneck mic system, the Miniflex, Model 4. This uses an external power source, so it's the only style of fully internal amplification system you can install inside an archtop guitar, seeing as there isn't a large soundhole to reach inside to change a battery.

Unusual factory features

It has the Art Deco bridge/base and full body/neck/headstock tortoiseshell binding. The pickguard had a multiple white/blackwhite binding on it that I had restored as the original had fallen off.

Added to Gretsch-GEAR
2 years ago Last modified 2017-10-06 00:04:41

This guitar dates to late '41 according to Ed so I've nicknamed it my 'Pearl Harbor' guitar. I'm only the second player to own it. The original owner got sick and could no longer play around 2010. He gave it to his grandson who didn't play and he put it in a pawn shop where it didn't sell - too expensive for a place like that - so he sold it to a dealer in the Chicago area and that's who I bought it from in Sept '14. Not often you run across a guitar this old that's only had one previous owner!

Well, how does it feel and how does it sound?

Sorry, didn’t see this question till I edited the profile.

This guitar has the asymmetric neck but I don’t notice this offset feature when I play, and I play fingerstyle. It has a big voice and very nice tone and sustain. The sound is halfway between a flattop and an archtop.

Some vintage archtops have a very dead, flat, uninspiring sound with little to no sustain but not this one! You can play any style of music and it suits it perfectly. Having a nice carved spruce top gives the superior tone & sustain.

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