The Woodshed

What do You use???

1

Whenever I need a quick and simple source to get the Chords/Notes for a song, for many years now my go to guitar tab/Info source has been Ultimate Guitar tab. Punch in a song title and I usually find the correct version of Tablature/Chord chart for just about any song, Even though some Post are completely off from the original tune theres always at least something that will get me playing in the right direction.

I also paid for the Guitar Pro program years ago as well. It comes in handy for getting guitar Solo's without too much effort. I really like its ease of use.

I have tried Songster and Riff Station and they both have their merits. Riff Station can give the the Chord charts for songs right off of YouTube which is really cool for those obscure songs which I cannot find a Tab for. I think I am going to break down and Pay for the Riff Station program because the Trial Version is limited.

I know I should attempt to figure out the songs on my own, but Nope, sometimes I just need a quick and dirty chord chart to get me going.

What are you using and what "New" tool for guitar players is out there.

2

When I am starting to record a new cover song, I start with UltimateGuitar.com for lyrics and a ballpark approximation. That gets me 10-15% there. The rest is ear (strum pattern, inversions, guitar solo, bass, drums, aux percussion, piano, organ, strings, horns, vocal harmonies, etc.). That's why each tune takes me 40 or more hours to record, depending on complexity.

5

I try to use my ears as much as possible but lately with less time on my hands I'm using tab books to just get straight where I want to be. I tend to just order a specific book I want online, like right now I'm using a really good Brian Setzer book, I can't do that by ear, or at all really lol.

6

My ears. One musical gift I've been given is that I pick up a song as I hear it. I can jam along with TV or radio, and I usually "practice" along with CDs. I don't catch lyrics until I've heard the song a hundred times.

7

Tabs are always wrong. Use your ears.

8

I try to use my ears as much as possible but lately with less time on my hands I'm using tab books to just get straight where I want to be. I tend to just order a specific book I want online, like right now I'm using a really good Brian Setzer book, I can't do that by ear, or at all really lol.

– Chmason85

Please tell us what Brian Setzer book that is.

Thanks

9

Tabs are always wrong. Use your ears.

– Billy Zoom

My ears are Always wrong too.

10

I'm no help. I do what Tartan Phantom does. The thing is, I screw my music up worse than others.

12

I like chord charts, and I've used tablatures, but I almost always used my ear as the starting point. I can usually listen to a tune several times, and learn it out of my head. I then play along with the real recording and make corrections, and add the finer points. On especially complex tunes, a good tablature is helpful for me.

13

I like chord charts, and I've used tablatures, but I almost always used my ear as the starting point. I can usually listen to a tune several times, and learn it out of my head. I then play along with the real recording and make corrections, and add the finer points. On especially complex tunes, a good tablature is helpful for me.

– Wade H

Like yourself, I initially try my ears first , but since time is always an issue, I eventually head to the computer and just end up printing out a Tab sheet that sounds like the tune im trying to learn.

15

If I have to learn a cover and I can't get by on my ears or wonder about the tuning used, I get on Youtube and watch several different videos on how to play. You can usually determine which the best or correct one is or who the better teacher is. There are some really great ones out there and some bad ones too. I couldn't ever read tabs or music.

16

I still use GuitarPro just so I don't lose or forget anything I transpose / create.

17

On the odd occasion I try to look up a chord chart for a tune online, it's hard to find anything but cowboy chords shown. Fine for a student learning to play rhythm guitar for a 3-chord Buck Owens tune but just insulting really for anyone wanting the real chords, especially all the moving chords used in a fingerstyle chart for a complicated song. Due to fingerstyle's requiring use of a lot of open strings, I don't play in a wide array of keys, so transposing from online is necessary. I just find it less frustrating to noodle around till I work it out.

18

Ears first, then Ultimate Guitar for chords and Tab Pro if I need tabs. Even if they are wrong, it steers me in the right direction.

19

Ears. Tabs weren’t that common when I picked up the guitar, and the ones that were available were wrong (one example: Dire Straits, where a couple of live videos revealed what Mark Knopfler actually played, which was nothing like what the book said), so I’ve trusted my ears ever since.

Anders

20

Ears, repetition, and if it's available, piano sheet music. There are lead sheets out there, but for the most part they are so rife with errors that they're not really worth my time unless I know the source.

Oddly, I've never tried Ultimate Guitar.

21

I try not to rely too much on tabs posted to the internet. Most of them I've seen leave much to be desired. I have used transcriptions in the past, however for tunes that were just a step or two beyond my ken. Beyond that, I rely on my ear, and ideas from a couple of fellows I regularly jam with. I figure that as long as I get the signature riff, if there is one, down exactly, the rest is optional, including the key.

22

I start with much of what is said on the thread. When I run across a roadblock, I use an app called iRehearse. You can loop the phrases your having trouble with and slow the song down. If you work the treble and bass volumes it's a liitle more refined. Once you've learned the basics, it's just how you interpret the song. Also You Tube is a great start.

23

Learning by ear is great, for a few reasons. Anytime we use our ears it is good for us; as ear training for one thing. Also, when we take in information aurally, it stimulates the part of the brain associated with intuitive processes. That's where our creativity happens. When we learn from a page it goes into a different part of the brain. This was proven by monitoring the brain activity of experimental subjects in real time.

We're also going to get the right chords and some idea of how to interpret the melody. It can however, be helpful to find a published version of the melody of a song for accuracy and comparison to the performance version.

A good procedure is [1] learn the melody [2] learn the root motion of the harmony (take this from the bass) [3] learn the basic chords [4] learn the details of the chords, finger picking patterns, riffs, etc.

Some people suggest learning the words too. Lyrics can help us remember the music as we're less likely to forget the words, and we attach the music to the words. They also help us form an emotional connection with the song. Learning even one or two lines is helpful as a clue for interpretation of the melody.

24

Looks like Im going to go the Ear route for a bit and also try a few of the suggestions. I do use Youtube quite a bit, theres a guy on there that really breaks down songs very well.

25

Everything helps but you should not trust anything to be infallible. Billy Z is right that you should use your ears. Who knows, you may improve on the original.


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