Vintage Gretsch Guitars

Vintage player 6192 - nice price on Ebay

3

I personally find the fact that it is well played in the neck to be a positive sign. People don't play lousy guitars day in day out as this one was at some point. I'd so buy this over a modern one that costs more any day of the week.

I'm surprised Gibson Dependable hasn't shown up and claim it to butcher and part out.

4

Ah, Mojo's in Bellingham, WA!

5

I personally find the fact that it is well played in the neck to be a positive sign. People don't play lousy guitars day in day out as this one was at some point. I'd so buy this over a modern one that costs more any day of the week.

I'm surprised Gibson Dependable hasn't shown up and claim it to butcher and part out.

– knavel

I completely agree knavel... I got my well played '62 Club for just north of $2k and was thrilled! To think you could grab a great playing Golden era Gretsch for something south of $1700 struck me as a great opportunity for someone.

6

Such a shame those guitars have the mute and the backpad/hole in the back!!!

7

Walter... that hole in the back (and pad) come in handy when you want to remove the useless mute apparatus!

8

The electronics are mostly good. The middle and down position on pickup selector produces no sound.

???

I mean, most likely an easy fix, especially given the hole in the back. But, come on. If only one pup position works, electronics are most definitely not "mostly good".

9

Even if you gut the mute system you're left with the dam hole! Of more concern to me though is that models with the mute have the bridge pup located a decent distance further from the bridge than models without a mute. Not as far north as a stereo set up but noticeable.

Probably a relatively easy fix for the pup selector switch but I agree it's a stretch to call it "mostly good". I'd describe its overall condition as ridden hard and put away wet.

10

I'll take the chance on the pickup selector issue if I could get the guitar for $1650. It's a player, I might even replace the entire harness.

The hole in the back is not a big deal. Plastic cover and back pad conseal it, and it provides a nice place to stash stuff!

11

I didn't really get into the nitty gritty of the listing, but of course if I were seriously considering buying I'd make the seller indemnify for a dead pick up if that is the issue.

I am more concerned that a music store can't even bother to spend 10 minutes ( actually make that 5 minutes since there is rear access) to figure out the issue.

60s Gretsches have been far more reliable throughout my musical life than 50s ones. I also like sunburst because no one plays it anymore and Dave I don't think you like that either!

12

I'm sorry to the sunburst lovers around here for not appreciating them the way you do, but I just don't like the color combination along with the fact that much of the wood's grain is hidden by the black.

And it's probably just me, but when I see a vintage Gretsch hollow/semi- hollowbody in tobacco sunburst my mind automatically goes to it's being an Annie; the reason being that growing up through the '60's, I saw so many Annies in bands with this finish.

BTW, these Annies were always the choice for rhythm guitar. Can't recall ever seeing a Gretsch as the lead guitar.....those were always a Fender or Gibson plank.

13

Such a shame those guitars have the mute and the backpad/hole in the back!!!

– WB

The mutes are cool . Contrary to the consensus of the masses they can actually be useful given some imagination. I've used them to cool effect in the studio. The mutes are only useless to those who can't imagine how to use them. And removing them doesn't do anything positive unless you plan to move the bridge pickup. And I love the backpads on mine. Cue the inevitable chorus of Jimmy Webster slammers!

Dave?? You don't like sunbursts?? Are you okay?

I like the faux spruce top on this one, give it a cool look.

14

Mutes or not and given that the back isn't visible to anyone while playing, I think Jimmy's backpads are very useful. They don't add any appreciable weight and offer protection against belt buckle rash.

Save sunbursts for non-flame or striped maple top guitars and let the spruce tops, laminate or otherwise and the figured maples remain a natural finish to display the nice grains.

15

The mutes are cool . Contrary to the consensus of the masses they can actually be useful given some imagination. I've used them to cool effect in the studio. The mutes are only useless to those who can't imagine how to use them. And removing them doesn't do anything positive unless you plan to move the bridge pickup. And I love the backpads on mine. Cue the inevitable chorus of Jimmy Webster slammers!

Dave?? You don't like sunbursts?? Are you okay?

I like the faux spruce top on this one, give it a cool look.

– Toxophilite

about 99.9% of the guitar-loving public, including Gretsch fans would disagree with you there.

The main thing I don't like about it (and about the current electromatic hollowbodies, and the current Korean Guild hollowbodies btw...) is the bridge pickup moved towards the neck. A big part of the magic, for me anyways, is the "both pickups on" sound on guitars like this, and it gets entirely too mellow with that bridge pickup moved forward.

16

offer protection against belt buckle rash.

While I accepted this rationale on a superficial level when I first heard it trotted out ages ago, a couple minutes’ reflection revealed its silliness.

To protect a nice piece of wood from damage, we’ll just cut out a huge chunk of it, then complete the job by surrounding the hole and its plastic cover with 8 snaps screwed into what’s left of the wood we’re protecting?

Good plan! All we need is some plastic leatherette and gold piping and it’s a winner!

I have nothing against the backpad-and-hatch design in its historical and reissued context, I’m just suggesting the “protects from buckle rash” herring smells pretty red.

(Well, I mean, in a completely literal way, yes, the wood that was cut out and thrown away will never get buckle rash. But that’s a little like keeping your kid from wrecking your car by wrecking it yourself first.)

17

Proteus, ha ha, I thoroughly enjoyed your take on back pad protection.

18

Pretty sure the backpad was never for buckle rash, and perhaps was the afterthought/spin for covering that hell hole in the back.

19

Nevertheless, I've heard that rationale for decades. Where it originated, I don't know.

20

about 99.9% of the guitar-loving public, including Gretsch fans would disagree with you there.

The main thing I don't like about it (and about the current electromatic hollowbodies, and the current Korean Guild hollowbodies btw...) is the bridge pickup moved towards the neck. A big part of the magic, for me anyways, is the "both pickups on" sound on guitars like this, and it gets entirely too mellow with that bridge pickup moved forward.

– WB

I completely agree with this, when the bridge pickup is closer to the bridge you get that Gretsch snarl.

If I ever get a few minutes I'm moving the bridge pickup back on my made in Merica Electro.

21

Pretty sure the backpad was never for buckle rash, and perhaps was the afterthought/spin for covering that hell hole in the back.

– JazzBoxJunky

Yeah that hell hole looks like they shipped them to Rickenbacker to cut said hole.

AND, that hole is completely unnecessary, you can fish everything through the pickup holes it just take a few extra minutes.

22

I completely agree with this, when the bridge pickup is closer to the bridge you get that Gretsch snarl.

If I ever get a few minutes I'm moving the bridge pickup back on my made in Merica Electro.

– Curt Wilson

Instead of moving the pickup, could you get similar results by replacing it with a hotter pickup-maybe classic plus or powertron? I am just wondering if the hotter pu could compensate for the space issue?

23

Instead of moving the pickup, could you get similar results by replacing it with a hotter pickup-maybe classic plus or powertron? I am just wondering if the hotter pu could compensate for the space issue?

– Baba Joe

I think a hotter pickup would only accentuate the mids even more as the bridge pickup is moved away from the bridge. I believe you would be able to compensate more with a lighter wound pickup where the high end sound is already inherent in the pickup.

24

Instead of moving the pickup, could you get similar results by replacing it with a hotter pickup-maybe classic plus or powertron? I am just wondering if the hotter pu could compensate for the space issue?

– Baba Joe

No, quite the opposite. A hotter pickup usually has even less spank and treble.

You can't fool a pickup into thinking it's "picking up" a different part of the string. Moving it does the trick, I did that on my Korean Guild X175 too, and it worked exactly as expected.

25

about 99.9% of the guitar-loving public, including Gretsch fans would disagree with you there.

The main thing I don't like about it (and about the current electromatic hollowbodies, and the current Korean Guild hollowbodies btw...) is the bridge pickup moved towards the neck. A big part of the magic, for me anyways, is the "both pickups on" sound on guitars like this, and it gets entirely too mellow with that bridge pickup moved forward.

– WB

Happily I make my own decisions about what I like, and I'm completely happy with 99.9% of the guitar-loving public, including Gretsch fans making their own choices. I just think that the mutes can be used. You have to inventive that's all. Seems not many people actually try.

Anyway I like the pad and the mutes. The pad is hilarious, yeeha! the drunken hole and cheap plastic pad could've been done WAY better but they are classic Gretsch sloppy whatthehell workmanship. I have refurbished those mutes and the hole makes a big difference. I don't mind doing all the electronics through the F-holes(or through the bridge pickup hole like my Tennessean) but I wouldn't want to take out those little pins etc etc and adjust all those long awkward mechanical parts without that back hole.

Anyway I say again this is a cool guitar/


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