Vintage Gretsch Guitars

question about lacquer finish

1

I just got a 59/60 Annie that I'll be doing quite a bit to. One task is to cut a plexi riser for the neck pickup. The PAF Filter'tron will be moving to the bridge position and in its place will be a Dearmond 2000 style pickup. I want to paint the underside of the plexi riser that the Dearmond 2000 will sit on to match the Filter'tron ring; we'll call it silver/gray.

Question: Should I use lacquer, poly, enamel....? I want to avoid a chemical reaction with the original lacquer on the top. Thanks in advance.

2

Lacquer burns into its self when wet, don't know about dry?

3

I've used poly and or silver paint pens, No problems

4

Testor's---model car paint is made to be used on plastic. Even Rust-O-Leum has a paint formulated for plastic.

5

Make sure you let the thing dry and cure -- which may take a few days going from my one pickguard-making experience.

6

Testor's---model car paint is made to be used on plastic. Even Rust-O-Leum has a paint formulated for plastic.

– wabash slim

It's not the plastic that I'm concerned about, it's the potential for the paint that I use on the plastic to react with the lacquer on the guitar when they are in contact with one another. I remember having guitar stands with plastic on the part where the back of the guitar's neck rested and the lacquer in that spot would become gummy.

7

It's not the plastic that I'm concerned about, it's the potential for the paint that I use on the plastic to react with the lacquer on the guitar when they are in contact with one another. I remember having guitar stands with plastic on the part where the back of the guitar's neck rested and the lacquer in that spot would become gummy.

– Journeyman

Yep, had that happen on older guitars at both the neck and lower parts that touch. Covered the stand with cloth to stop it. always thought it was the rubber it rested on?


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