Vintage Gretsch Guitars

Old 6119 red finish

1

Does anyone know what this colour is (actual colour name or modern equivalent) I seem to remember it being an opaque finish rather than a stain, yes?

2

Flagstaff sunset. My '59 was a stain as much as the orange 6120 was. Workmanship was excellent.

3

At first this 1960 looks opaque, but...

...on closer inspection it’s a stain.

4

Some showed some grain but others were solid lipstick red ?

5

The same can be said for the orange finish on the 6120. The earlier model years ('55- early 60s) seem to be stain, but there are double-cutaway electrotone examples out there that are quite opaque.

6

When I was a young fellow, looking for my first Gretsch in Chicago, a small neighborhood store had a 6120 DC Nashville on the wall. This was in '67.

It had been hanging there for a good year and a half. Tennies and Gents would come in slowly, and go out the door quickly, but this particular Nashville just stayed in its spot.

I played it several times, and the owner was really pushing for me to pull the trigger on it.

I noticed that there were "tape" marks on all the bindings that met the orange color. The more I looked at it, it was apparant that the orange was paint, as zero wood grain could be seen anywhere on the body and neck.

Questioning the owner about this, he stated that this was how Gretsch did the orange on these. Ok????? I passed.

This stuck in my head for decades, and then I had a chance to talk with Duke about this guitar.

He said this was not common, but if a top was flawed with some ugly dark grain spots, and got down the line, units were taped and sprayed with paint to hide the grain flaw, and get the unit out the door.

Remember he said, in the mid 60's, Gretsch couldn't keep up with the sales, more less the back orders.

"Tape um, paint um' ship um" lol. Not a large number of units got this treatment, but they are out there.

Just sharing this little tid bit.

7

When I was a young fellow, looking for my first Gretsch in Chicago, a small neighborhood store had a 6120 DC Nashville on the wall. This was in '67.

It had been hanging there for a good year and a half. Tennies and Gents would come in slowly, and go out the door quickly, but this particular Nashville just stayed in its spot.

I played it several times, and the owner was really pushing for me to pull the trigger on it.

I noticed that there were "tape" marks on all the bindings that met the orange color. The more I looked at it, it was apparant that the orange was paint, as zero wood grain could be seen anywhere on the body and neck.

Questioning the owner about this, he stated that this was how Gretsch did the orange on these. Ok????? I passed.

This stuck in my head for decades, and then I had a chance to talk with Duke about this guitar.

He said this was not common, but if a top was flawed with some ugly dark grain spots, and got down the line, units were taped and sprayed with paint to hide the grain flaw, and get the unit out the door.

Remember he said, in the mid 60's, Gretsch couldn't keep up with the sales, more less the back orders.

"Tape um, paint um' ship um" lol. Not a large number of units got this treatment, but they are out there.

Just sharing this little tid bit.

– J(ust an old Cowboy)D

This is funny, though I don't see it as being bad if it's purely a cosmetic issue they're resolving. I always thought the 60s Nashvilles had opaque paint anyway.

It reminds me of working at Larrivee. I was buffing the top end models, and the quality and quantity of the guitars we would mark as seconds would decline as production slowed, and increase as production picked up.

8

Toxophilite the 6119 was designated as a Western Red Maple stain finish


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