Vintage Gretsch Guitars

I love it! A perfect Copy

2

That'll be the next iteration of relicing, actually damage the guitar!

3

This is real binding rot on a real late 70s gretsch copy!

4

Well, I dunno. The Greco copies have been well-known for decades - generally considered very well-made, and arguably as good a guitar as Gretsch was making at the time. That it has binding rot can be made to sound funny...but it's equally an indication that the guitar was really quite a close copy, down to the materials used.

Grecos were made for Kanda Shokai by Fuji Gen and Matsomoku, the premier Japanese builders. This guitar is apparently from the 1979 "Super Real" series; by 1982, Kanda Shokai became part of Fender Japan. (KS now handles Gretsch distribution in Japan.)

So the family trees have become very interwoven; guitars like this illustrate why. It's just as historical in its way as a Gretsch from the era.

I have numerous Matsumoku-made instruments from the early-mid 80s, including a full hollowbody and a centerblock semi. I treasure them for their high quality, tone and playability. This guitar certainly looks like "Uncle Mat" work. I ought to be all over it, as it represents a unique intersection of my two main guitar obsessions - but it has binding rot!

I suppose this example is overpriced - but then again you don't see them often.

5

I can't have a bit of fun with a guitar?? Is this very serious stuff we can't have a laugh at?? Hell it's a Gretsch copy that has Gretsch style binding rot! if that's not funny then what is??

It's obviously a great copy. I posted another copy here (a 6120) that looked better made than an actual 6120 and it was way more attractively priced. I'm not knocking copies. I have a couple of vintage Japanese L-5 / ES-350 type archtops, both of which are better quality builds than most top of the line gretschs. The Japanese make great stuff!

I wish things were priced according to their actual quality and merits but that's not the world we live in . People buy names.

In the actual world market I think this would be a high price for a Gretsch country gent with extensive rot. One would expect a copy in similar condition to fetch less.

6

I just suck at fun is all.

It IS funny that a Gretsch copy has binding rot, just didn't want the context to be lost.

And I spect it is way overpriced for a copy, binding rot or not. (Though if absolute rarity plays a role in valuation, an excellent 1979 Greco copy of a 60s Gent is rarer than a 60s Gent. I just don't know if there are enough collectors of that sort of thing to support the price. Of course it only takes two.)

7

Grecos were made for Kanda Shokai by Fuji Gen and Matsomoku, the premier Japanese builders. This guitar is apparently from the 1979 "Super Real" series; by 1982, Kanda Shokai became part of Fender Japan. (KS now handles Gretsch distribution in Japan.)

So the family trees have become very interwoven; guitars like this illustrate why.

They also illustrate why Japan would have been the natural, easy choice for Fred Gretsch in the late '80s. They were already making Gretsches. What I don't understand is why the early modern Gretsches were so "off" while the knock-offs were so "right" (there are aspects of this guitar the look even more accurate than the current Gretsch reissues). But I seem to recall that early modern Gretsches may have all been built by Terada. Maybe Terada didn't have the Gretsch knock-off experience of some of the other Japanese factories.

8

How ironic that Japan, the country who made the best Gretsch guitar copies, are now making the real deal.

9

One would almost rather say 'How Appropriate"


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