Vintage Gretsch Guitars

I admit i’m tempted

1

Like some of you, I find that (apparently) decent deals turn up on GC vintage... not very often of course and lots is junk. But here's a clean looking early Anniversary that has made me pause... but the budget is toast for now, so over to you

http://www.guitarcenter.com...

2

It's right down the street. I can go try it out.

3

Not Pasadena Maryland, however.

5

I work in Burbank which is about 15 miles away from this store. I could be persuaded to make the drive to check it out if anyone is curious.

6

Thanks, Buddy, but I just wanted to play it.

8

Maybe it's just me, but early or no and in good condition, $1500 for a single Annie seems a tad high to me.....and it's the sunburst version, not the two tone smokey green.

9

That looks very good indeed! If I have time this weekend, I'll have to check it out.

EDIT: oops, I was reading the ship-to location. Didn't realize this is in S. California.

10

I think that it's you, Windsordave. Getting a 1958 vintage guitar in good condition for $1500 is pretty good, I think. You would pay more for a new model.

11

No doubt your right. I realize finding a clean '58 adds a certain value but it being a single pup keeps the value lower in my book, and the sunburst finish is the most common and generally regarded as not as desirable as the two tone green version.

True, the new ones are a lot more but with the choices, no modding to upgrade is required. On the other hand, changing out the SC bridge on this one and you'd have a nice jazz axe for a fraction of a big Gibson jazz box.

12

I kind of agree with Dave. It's not out of line, but not a bargain either. I've seen single pickup 1950s Anniversaries cheaper at GC's used gear department before. IMO single neck pickup guitars are way undervalued to begin with. And it's hard to tell condition from this pic. What appears to be heavy plating wear on the usually robust FilterTron cover and a chunk of the headstock veneer missing tend to suggest that they might not be describing it as only "good" out of coyness.

13

"Serial number re-written on masking tape." Hmmm....

14

Much as the 50's Streamliners provide a nice entry level archtop for guys just getting into the vintage gear scene, the Filtertron Annie gets you a lot of vintage goodness for a reasonable cost of entry. With some mods (bigsby and a TV Classic) these can be decent 6120 wannabe models.

15

I hear you Ed, but wouldn't putting on a [new] B6 Bigsby, and adding 1 TV Filter and top-of-the-line bridge [such as a Tru Arc] up your investment to nudging $2K If you want to go further and add a second pup and the requisite wiring harness/switches/knobs, you're well north of $2K and it's money I'm not sure you'd get back if you sold it......maybe....maybe not.

An almost new but used Annie someone doesn't want, come up for sale a bunch cheaper than new and quite regularly. New and with no issues, everything top-of-the-line for the same money, or close enough?? Seems it would come down to personal preference of vintage or new. Now if this guitar was going for $1K, I'd definitely say upgrading it whole-hog would be worthwhile.

Edit: You would recoup some cash if you sold the original Filter or conversely bought another vintage Filter - not cheap! - instead of a pair of TV's there is that.

16

True enough Dave. Do the reissue Annie's have trestle bracing? If so that adds more validity to your argument. If not, then that's a measurable difference, to which I add the romance of the vintage factor. I would guess that reissue Annie's are poly finished making a refin (6120 orange) more of a chore than the vintage finish (I could be wrong there).

The '58 and '59 Annie's were just great guitars for the money, actually under priced at their inception. There are a ton of vintage Annie's out there, but the Filter models are the minority.

For many, the idea of an actual 58/59 Gretsch electric archtop with 2 humbuckers and a Bigsby for $2k is pretty attractive, especially compared to Fender and Gibson models from those model years. But then again... I'm not the most objective cat on the planet.

17

True enough Dave. Do the reissue Annie's have trestle bracing? If so that adds more validity to your argument. If not, then that's a measurable difference, to which I add the romance of the vintage factor. I would guess that reissue Annie's are poly finished making a refin (6120 orange) more of a chore than the vintage finish (I could be wrong there).

The '58 and '59 Annie's were just great guitars for the money, actually under priced at their inception. There are a ton of vintage Annie's out there, but the Filter models are the minority.

For many, the idea of an actual 58/59 Gretsch electric archtop with 2 humbuckers and a Bigsby for $2k is pretty attractive, especially compared to Fender and Gibson models from those model years. But then again... I'm not the most objective cat on the planet.

– kc_eddie_b

The reissues have the ML bracing in them and a poly finish. I agree about the romance of the early Annies, but for me it would have to be the double pup version so all that would need changing is putting on a nice B6 Bigsby and a better bridge. No extra costs for a pup to buy and the related harness/switches/knobs to flush it out.

And if you got one cheap enough and it was in good shape, you could bind the neck and headstock. If you're so inclined to rid it of it's sunburst, you can either go the 6120 orange or the two tone smokey green

18

+1 on Ed's "great guitar for the money" comment. Honestly, the more I play my '59, the more crazy I am for it.

So I see the flip side of the investment. I'd say a single Annie like this, on the cheap like this, is a fine way to go. Add a TV Jones Ray Butts reissue, rewire, throw in a Bigsby, and run. Vintage goodness out of the gate, and for $500-$600 additional investment you're set, all in, for $2k or under. And yeah, with a bridge swap, you're just north of that.

I suppose it also matters if you want it to play vs. own to collect. All of the above opinion is tied to having a great guitar to play, so that works for me and for the music I like to play. The old Annies can be 100% killer guitars with some TLC and devotion. Call it romance, but I have not had as much satisfaction from any new Gretsch.

19

I agree with Ed and redrocker. Easy conversion and well worth it if the guitar is in good playing shape - i.e. no neck reset required.

20

If its still there Monday, I'll go check it out, I drive right by there on the 210 freeway....I must say, I kinda like the sunburst, I might just buy it. Thanks for the tip

21

Well it does pay to troll GC used/vintage sometimes. Some times pix and titles are wrong and all sorts of absurd stuff, and most is overpriced or at @ market. But a few deals lurk in there (sometimes).


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