Vintage Gretsch Guitars

Gretsch 7607 - 1975

1

Hi guys,

I've just acquired what I believe is 7607 from, I believe, 1975. Serial number is 5-5065.

It has the original scratchplate but no fitting. Can anybody advise on how this connects to the guitar? Sorry if that seems a silly question.

I find the tone knobs go from 0-10 way quicker than you would expect, almost no travel. I'm also unsure how the tone switch works, if anybody can advise!

Also, any advice on best string gauge? And a compatible case?

Last thing, any idea on value? I'm in the UK.

2

Congrats! You've got your hands on some real Gretsch history there. Can you post pic's for your issue? I'm sure we could figure it out for you.

4

It has the original scratchplate but no fitting. Can anybody advise on how this connects to the guitar? Sorry if that seems a silly question.

Not in the case of the Broadkaster. I never noticed it before, but they don't have a pickguard bracket. It appears that the second screw goes into the F-hole. There must have been something there to screw into. Maybe it was a long screw and there's something glued to the back to accept it? Regardless, I think it shouldn't be too hard to jury-rig something to screw it into. And there would have been (and maybe still are) blocks of felt that set the height.

Strings are all personal preference. This guitar would be fine with whatever gauge you prefer. I like 11s on a Gretsch, but that's just me.

5

Now that is odd. I can't answer that one.

6

I'd noticed that many of the '70's Gretsches didn't have pickguard brackets, but I thought they just drilled into the top. This sure looks like it's going into the f-hole.

7

I'd noticed that many of the '70's Gretsches didn't have pickguard brackets, but I thought they just drilled into the top. This sure looks like it's going into the f-hole.

– lx

Given that the OP's guitar doesn't have another hole in the body, I think it was definitely anchored in the F-hole somehow. But like I said before, it wouldn't be that hard to rig up something to make it work.

8

Thanks, guys. I will try felting the rear of the pickguard to pad it out and protect the body and see what I can do with it. Struggling to find more info - and they seem to be incredibly rare guitars.

It appears all original, although I've just realised the pickup surrounds aren't. Not sure why somebody chose to put transparent ones on.

Do they have much value?

9

Nice find. I'm with Afire on .11s

10

It appears all original, although I've just realised the pickup surrounds aren't. Not sure why somebody chose to put transparent ones on. You can just strip the silver paint and paint the back black.

And here's an illustration of what I was talking about with the felt blocks. One goes by the neck and the screw runs through it. The other is somewhere on the other side to raise it from the body.

11

The 'tone' switch dials 'mud' (up) or 'more mud' (down). Centre is bypass the mud. The selector is just neck, both, or bridge.

Some folks can use them, (mud loving denizens) and live with them, but not me.

I often fantasize about putting a Varitone on the lower cutaway bout of my Gent, and converting the mud switch to a in/out of phase switch.

As yet, it's a bit too severe to consider as a mod, and sacrilegious cosmetically, but I'm sure the very many new-found tones would be wonderful.

ritchie bg

12

@Afire - thanks for the felt pictures Just checking that the screw just goes through it and the felt holds it in place? Looks like it.

Thanks, @Richie... I found some other info which helped make sense of it. It will live in the middle position!

Can anybody suggest a fair valuation, considering buckle rash and no original case?

13

@Afire - thanks for the felt pictures Just checking that the screw just goes through it and the felt holds it in place? Looks like it.

The screw by the neck goes through that felt block. The other screw normally attaches to a bracket, but in your case, it attaches to something in the f-hole. The second felt block rests on the body.


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