Vintage Gretsch Guitars

dig this tenor Jet @ GC

2

I doubt it's a '56 (as marketed) but I have zero expectations of GC on these things. At least they've managed to accurately identified this one as a 4-string!

3

I wonder if it's Tooch's tenor.

I know he sold it finally.

4

I wonder if it's Tooch's tenor.

I know he sold it finally.

– crowbone

Didn't his have the extra plugged holes in the headstock from a time when it was covered to a 6-string? I might be mis-recalling that though.

5

It may have.

The Duo Jet tenors don't do what Elvis Costello's 6120 Tenor does though.

That, to me, is really beautiful.

6

Was there a standard tuning for tenor guitar, that is -- something different that top 4 (E B G D) of regular guitar?

7

If this post has gotten the juices flowing for any of ya'll, and you've decided you NEED to own a vintage Gretsch electric tenor guitar... I would let mine go for a fraction of what GC wants for that Jet! She's a 1953 Corvette variation... when's the last time you saw another??

8

If this post has gotten the juices flowing for any of ya'll, and you've decided you NEED to own a vintage Gretsch electric tenor guitar... I would let mine go for a fraction of what GC wants for that Jet! She's a 1953 Corvette variation... when's the last time you saw another??

– kc_eddie_b

You need to reach out to Neko Case. Hmmm. Or I could do that for you....

9

My friend Scott Jennings who had Route 66 Guitars in Pasadena years ago had one of these Tenor Jets. Looked exactly like this one. This was like early 90’s... Cool guitars!

10

Was there a standard tuning for tenor guitar, that is -- something different that top 4 (E B G D) of regular guitar?

– DCBirdMan

Yes. It's generally tenor banjo tuning, which is usually the same as a viola (CGDA- low to high) or sometimes octave mandolin tuning (GDAE). The whole idea behind the creation of the tenor guitar was to allow tenor banjo players to adapt more easily to a guitar-based sound. Believe it or not, there was once a time when both tenor banjo and mandolin were much more popular than guitar in the US.

Sometimes you'll see people use a baritone uke tuning, which is DGBE-- but that's really just for lazy guitar players... It doesn't give the benefit of the unique tenor voicing.


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