Vintage Gretsch Guitars

Calgary 1962 6120

1

This is an interesting one, Bigsby is in the case, lots of work done, dead switches on the front. How much is too much?

The binding looks very white, but has some cracks.

Has anyone in Calgary looked at it?

http://www.guitarworks.ca/1...

2

Way overpriced.

3

I think a 62 would have a dial up mute.

4
52xxx is too late for 1962. I think I see binding rot at the treble neck cutaway; headstock looks off. You can find clean examples starting at around $3K.
5

Yes, mute should be dial up; pickguard isn't original as this one doesn't fit properly. Wrong bridge and modded with extra hole for the stereo switch.

Mods or no mods, overpricing like this is common in Canada as they try to justify the price by converting to US prices via the exchange rate, also with no shipping or import fees thereby claiming "it's a bargain!"

They do have a point if the guitar is a fine example and not modded. At 32% exchange, it comes in at $2380 US which would be reasonable....if it were original.

6

Definitely right about the idiosyncrasies of Canadian pricing.

I must say, though, the double cut 6120s are the guitar that got me into gretsches. My 6122-1959 is a thing of refined beauty, but this particular model has always seemed like the rough around the edges cousin.

I saw a 1964 specimen for sale in my neck of the woods for a little bit less and it had me thinking about making he switch...

Any thoughts out there on moving from modern gretsches to the vintage world?

7

Try it before you buy it; or get a 100% money back guarantee if doing the web thing. And always post here with links and pics before you buy; lotsa scammers. Hmm, not too different from any guitar transaction, actually.

8

Too bad about the extra switches and jack, otherwise no big problems I see. Not sure what's going on at the front of the headstock?

The nut has been replaced - I didn't see that mentioned. The "filled-in extra strap button hole" is just the neck dowel I think and not a reversed mod.

I would try to get it for closer to $2000 if I were you.

9

otherwise no big problems I see.

In addition to all the variations from stock set out above, there are the replaced tuners and I see what looks like an added jack plate.

Any thoughts out there on moving from modern gretsches to the vintage world?

Double cut 60s Gretsches are not far off in price from the current Japanese made ones. Simply on the basis of nitro finish and the ebony necks on the higher end models, I prefer vintage. Just be very mindful of binding rot. it's expensive to fix.

10

Definitely right about the idiosyncrasies of Canadian pricing.

I must say, though, the double cut 6120s are the guitar that got me into gretsches. My 6122-1959 is a thing of refined beauty, but this particular model has always seemed like the rough around the edges cousin.

I saw a 1964 specimen for sale in my neck of the woods for a little bit less and it had me thinking about making he switch...

Any thoughts out there on moving from modern gretsches to the vintage world?

– jalexanderdixon

IMO, you'd regret swapping any, and I mean any vintage DC 6120 for your modern 6122-59. That Gent doesn't have any issues and is unlikely to develop any in your lifetime. If it's the colour that's drawing you to it, then look for an HOF 6122. Aside from the colour, it's basically the same guitar as the one you have now only in orange, with the faux f-holes having a painted binding, which really looks sharp. And it has the same wider neck you're now used to as well.

An HOF model won't have any mod issues but having said that, there's always idiots out there, so it will hold its value as it had a very limited run.

11

IMO, you'd regret swapping any, and I mean any vintage DC 6120 for your modern 6122-59. That Gent doesn't have any issues and is unlikely to develop any in your lifetime. If it's the colour that's drawing you to it, then look for an HOF 6122. Aside from the colour, it's basically the same guitar as the one you have now only in orange, with the faux f-holes having a painted binding, which really looks sharp. And it has the same wider neck you're now used to as well.

An HOF model won't have any mod issues but having said that, there's always idiots out there, so it will hold its value as it had a very limited run.

– Windsordave

That's my hunch, too. I like the 6122 in the walnut stain. Seems like the right colour for a gentleman!

Maybe I need two gretsches! While I like the character of the vintage ones, the headaches of binding rot and neck resets are a hard sell compared to the reliability of the modern proline.

For comparison, here's a 6120 for sale in my neck of the woods: http://www.kijiji.ca/v-guit...

12

Not a guarantee of course, but the earlier DC's are less prone to binding rot than we see on later '60's models.

This one looks in pretty good shape, from what we can see in the provided picks. Reversing the exchange rate puts it, give or take, around $2K which is a pretty good price for a clean copy.

Something you didn't mention but should I suggest be part of the conversation, relates to your comparisons between modern Gretsches and vintage versions. We have here for this model (and several others) a straight up comparison between [practically] identical guitars, so aside from the total cost to purchase, the comparison comes down to condition and issues now or possibly down the road, so we're entering into the vintage vs modern discussion, to a point. So I ask you, if the price differential is minimal, would you rather have a vintage 6120 DC with possible future expensive binding [or other] issues or a superbly made modern version of this [somewhat] iconic guitar that as I stated earlier, most likely won't develop any issues in your lifetime?

In my case, I own a '71 Super Chet that I've modified the control/pickguard issues and eliminated any future grief. I've always loved this model but as they never made an exact replica - forget the short-lived and not a perfect copy Super Gretsch - I had to buy a vintage one. Now had Gretsch been producing a perfect copy, I'd have gone the route of buying a new [or slightly used] version, foregoing the vintage models.

13

I'd happily swap any, and I mean any modern proline Gretsch for a nice early/mid '60s double cutaway 6120. But this isn't a nice one. So I'd keep looking. I had a '64 for a while and it was a great guitar.

14

If you want perfect, shiny, cookie-cutter... go with a Pro line. If you want character, mojo, cool factor, go with vintage (and put up with the maintenance obligations). There's a romance to vintage guitars that just doesn't exist with the modern ones. Just one man's perspective.

15

Looks like a player rather than a collector guitar. So not an investment but a tool. Its a matter of having qualities that make it a better tool, cost of ownership, than a newer version. And that could be subjective things like being inspired to play and compose on it because of its mojo as well as more objective or practical considerations.

16

I went through reverb last night out of curiosity, and all the ones in $3K-ish range had binding rot and other assorted problems; seems like you had to pay $4-5K for a clean example. You may want to make an offer depending on the condition. Figure about $1K for a total binding re-do.

17

I went through reverb last night out of curiosity, and all the ones in $3K-ish range had binding rot and other assorted problems; seems like you had to pay $4-5K for a clean example. You may want to make an offer depending on the condition. Figure about $1K for a total binding re-do.

– lx

That's a very exercise you went through lx. I for one appreciate your effort in educating us. Did you factor in solds as well on this hunt through reverb?


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