Modern Gretsch Guitars

Japanese 7655 Tennesean?

1

At first I thought this was a Baldwin era 7655. Then I noticed no zero fret and unbound f holes and the tailpiece. Seller says its a Japanese prototype based on the Baldwin era Tennys. Any thoughts? Anyone ever seen one of these before? Serial number is 0740

2

Dang, I am totally relatin' to the look of that. 70s style, but with Japanese build quality-- not Boonville build quality. I am not saying everything Baldwin/Boonville was bad, but it coudl be hit or miss. If that's up on the bay, etc. let us know.

3

Yes it is cute for sure. I have to say that I really like the baldwin era Gretsch guitars. Ive never played a bad one. I also stand alone in liking the designs of the Booneville generation guitars. Anyway thats for the vintage department. I havent played this so cant comment on its build quality but. I like the looks very much

4

Looks a little thinner than older Tenny models? If a prototype, makes you wonder how it got out into the public.

5

Dont tend to think of japanese prototypes but thats cos Im a vintage dude. Im not up on the modern stuff is there a way of finding out? Ive been told that japanese prototype serial numbers are 4 digits and range from 0001 to 1000. Any thoughts?

6

I'm a vintage dude also -- so can't be of much help.

But a Tenny like that might make me change.

I know the Tennesee Rose is a bucker FilterTenny, still haven't gone in for one tho.

What gets me is that some people refer to old Tennesseans as a Tennesse Rose

7

Is there not a modern Gretsch guitar section Ed Ball?

8

Is there not a modern Gretsch guitar section Ed Ball?

9

The early Terada Gretsches have exactly the same neck profiles as the three Boonville Gretsches I've tried; slim and comfortable. And the build quality was excellent. But that's only three. This certainly looks like a prototype: that slim body, pickguard, tone switch and fixed bridge never happened with the first generation of the Modern era Gretsches. Who is selling it and is there a serial # inside?

10

Gentlemen, it might make you feel better about being interested in this guitar to know that, if this is a prototype built before any Terada Gretsches were released for sale, it was built before 1990, which would make it at least 25 years old. That's nearly vintage, isn't it?

If there's a link to a selling or auction page, that would be helpful to have.

Paul/FF909

11

According to the seller there is no label. He states that this is normal practice for a prototype. Do we think this is real?

12

Gentlemen, it might make you feel better about being interested in this guitar to know that, if this is a prototype built before any Terada Gretsches were released for sale, it was built before 1990, which would make it at least 25 years old. That's nearly vintage, isn't it?

If there's a link to a selling or auction page, that would be helpful to have.

Paul/FF909

– Frequent Flyer 909

You raise an interesting point regarding Gretsch guitars built when they went back into production again in the late '80's. For instance, first, assuming that a '90's guitar that is now 25 years old begins being considered to be 'vintage', it can't simply be referred to as 'vintage' without an era adjective being added. 'Vintage' as we now use the term, refers to Gretsch guitars made either by Gretsch, up to the Baldwin takeover or under Baldwin ownership and quite frequently these Baldwin era guitars are described as vintage Baldwin to further define them, so I would expect that once Terada guitars get to be considered 'vintage', they'll need to have the name Terada attached to the description.

So how old does a Terada guitar have to be to now be considered 'vintage'?

13

I always though it was 30 years before it becomes vintage? Any ideas on this labeless prototype?

14

When Fred Gretsch reintroduced the Gretsch branded guitars he went to Randy Bachman to borrow many if his collection to reverse engineer and use as references. Randy was very gracious about this, but he did request that he end up with some of the prototypes made during this process. He may have released one or two out into the world, who knows.

Andrew... you ARE in the Modern Gretsch section.

15

Man all it's missing is a good Bigsby and sixties type pickguard... I once owned a Baldwin era Atkins Axe. That was a killer guitar. I wish I still owned it. I sold it in the early 80's to a Corpus Christi, Tx. Detective friend of mine. I bought it new in like78. I ended up putting a Bigsby on it and a T-O-M bridge mounted right into the top. Took whatever the pickups were in it and replaced those with Bill Lawrence humbuckings. That was the closest thing I could find in 1980 to a FilterTron as far as clarity and tone. The neck was killer and had a totally flat fingerboard like my Travis Bean's. If I remember I think I put a pull-pot for coil tap. Say what you want about the Baldwin stuff, that guitar was killer. I had two Travis Beans, a 58 6120 Chet, a60 Strat and a `59 Gibson Melody Maker-D. That Gretsch held it's own with those.

16

If it's serial #0740, where is this information on the guitar? I remember trying out a Terada Synchro 400 with a triangular soundhole sometime in 1991 and that was a model we never saw in regular production, so anything is possible.

17

The serial number is on back of headstock but no label. Is there a contact at gretsch who woukd know?


Register Sign in to join the conversation