Vintage Gretsch Guitars

Add On Mute

1

A couple of years ago, there was a thread asking about this little gem, and I identified it as a Gretsch-distributed add-on string mute. I'd seen another one on eBay, complete with box and instructions, but forgot the name of it. Now that we have a few newer members (and since the original thread is in the wind) I'd like to ask this question. Does anyone remember what this mute was called? It's name started with an "M" I think.

2

Does anyone remember what this mute was called? It's name started with an "M" I think.

A 'Muffler' - as used on drums, too?

3

It actually had a name like "Mitchell Mute", "Marman Mute", etc. I wrote the name down years ago, but darned if I can find it now.

4

I don't recall this one, but do recall the attachment that could be added onto a Melita bridge. I have a photo somewhere... will post later.

5

This one? I've got one of these. The above ad-on "M" mute had to have been in a Gretsch Accessories price list from the '60s. I wish I'd bought that one on eBay years ago, if for nothing else, just to have the box and instructions.

6

That's the one! Seen a couple of them... but not lately.

8

Believe it or not, the silly thing actually works...well! It uses non-rotting felt instead of Gretsch's rubber as a muffler. There are three little grooved wheels on the underside of the device which ride between the strings, allowing the player to slide it forward over the bridge to mute the strings or backwards to take the mute off. In the off position, it muffles the unwanted tones sometimes created by the strings between the bridge and tailpiece. Win-win.

9

Sort of reminds me of the Van Epps string damper, but from the other end.

10

Does anyone know where I can buy a felt muffler for a single mute system? lots of kits available but not with felt. Thanks.

11

I've seen the muffler felt replaced with mouse-pad material with success, but I have no source for actual felt mufflers.

12

I've used mousepad to replace the string mute's rubber, but mainly for cosmetics. Unfortunally, it is much too dense to work very well. The pink rubber pad in women's compacts actually works much better as it's about the same density as the original rubber. Now that Gretsch has reissued the string mutes, I wonder if the rubber could be obtained from them?

13

I've used mousepad to replace the string mute's rubber, but mainly for cosmetics. Unfortunally, it is much too dense to work very well. The pink rubber pad in women's compacts actually works much better as it's about the same density as the original rubber. Now that Gretsch has reissued the string mutes, I wonder if the rubber could be obtained from them?

– duojet55

Memory foam would work great. You can get a good sized block of real Temperpedic memory foam by requesting the mattress info from Temperpedic. We were thinking about one of their beds until we found out how expensive they are. However, I did get a great piece of foam for free.

14

Find someone who does piano/harpsichord/clavinet repair, and ask them for some scrap felt. They will have it in all thicknesses and probably several colors... if they only have white felt, you can color it easily with a large permanant marker (big Sharpie). There's almost always leftover scrap felt after a piano is serviced. You can fashion a damper pad from a large piece or several small pieces.

As an alternative, you can go to a fabric/sewing store and buy felt very cheaply. It's usually much thinner than piano felt, but using rubber cement you can glue/stack several pieces until you get the desired height, then cut to shape with an X-acto.

16

How sharp does it make the guitar sound? I used to have one of those Melita flip-ups. It was cute.

17

I thought the Gibson (Van Epps) string damper as pictured above was actually an instant capo. Weird place to put a string damper.

18

lx - the Van Eps damper is not intended to function as a mute like the Gretsch built in system, but rather to prevent open strings from sounding (inadvertently, through sympathetic vibration, etc) while playing further up the neck. Especially useful for jazz cats who play a lot of single note lines in higher positions.

19

Aaahh. That makes sense. I've seen those from years ago and it didn't seem logical as a capo; didn't seem like it would have enough downforce. I tried a '63 6120 a year ago and really, really liked it. Mute switch is fun.

20

A couple of years ago, there was a thread asking about this little gem, and I identified it as a Gretsch-distributed add-on string mute. I'd seen another one on eBay, complete with box and instructions, but forgot the name of it. Now that we have a few newer members (and since the original thread is in the wind) I'd like to ask this question. Does anyone remember what this mute was called? It's name started with an "M" I think.

– duojet55

Hi, the "M" = Meazzi Meazzi built guitars in Italy until the 1970's. This accessory was called "stoppatore" (muting...) and appeared on some solid body guitars, like my Meazzi Hollywood mod. Mustang 1969.

21

BTW, I saw felt that seemed like a match, it was for furniture floor glides.

22

Emmeci_55, thank you so much ! I never did find the piece of paper I'd written the name Meazzi down on. The one offered on eBay over 12 years ago came in a Gretsch-labeled box, complete with instructions. When I first got mine, I'd figured it was made for either US or UK export because it's foilcal says in English "Made in Italy". I've found several Meazzi guitar pictures with the mute attached. Those Meazzis are super cool guitars!

23

I am happy to have clarified the doubt. ;) Do you perhaps have a "stoppatore" to sell me? Mario

24

There was one on eBay about three months ago listed under Gretsch guitars. He wanted $99 for it. If it comes up again, I'll let you know.

25

Ok. On ebay I find nothing. I'll wait... Special thanks.


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