Vintage Gretsch Guitars

66 Walnut 6120

1

No Affiliation With Seller.

Interesting factory original finish with a black headstock and stinger. Too bad about the binding rot.

2

Brit prices for sure

Cool tho

4

Close up pics show clearly Gretsch's habit of installing the frets first and then the binding.....the binding becomes embedded in the binding instead of overhanging it properly.

5

Just like they should be.

6

Hey Windsor Dave that's called fret end binding and it was done by Gibson too, It's kind of a fancy schmancy thing to do and looks pretty sharp Personally I'm not too keen on it as I don't think it's viable in the long run as naturally the binding wears faster than the fret However it's not wrong or particular to Gretsch Not my thing though

7

Hey Windsor Dave that's called fret end binding and it was done by Gibson too, It's kind of a fancy schmancy thing to do and looks pretty sharp Personally I'm not too keen on it as I don't think it's viable in the long run as naturally the binding wears faster than the fret However it's not wrong or particular to Gretsch Not my thing though

– Toxophilite

Sorry guys, but this deal with the fret end/binding installation was a wrong/bad idea and here's why.

It may appear to be fancy, but really just a plain dumb idea (therefore wrong) from the standpoint that upon installation by hammering the binding onto the fret end, a binding crack is started internally - on the back side of the binding from the non-nipped off tang end. When the binding shrinks with age, these cracks push through to the surface and now your guitar has vertical cracks the entire width/depth of the binding the entire length of the neck on both sides at every fret. Not nipping off the tang and therefore not overhanging the binding was a cost cutting move by Gretsch at the time. If it had been such a great idea it would've continued being a favored construction technique but it didn't.

In conjunction with adopting this technique, Gretsch also had the nasty habit, and had been doing this for a very long time; they chamfered the end of the frets! This along with the frets ending short of the edge of the neck, removed valuable surface area for the strings to land on when fretted, thereby requiring the distance between both E strings to be reduced, leaving less space between all strings. Now this may not matter to non-fingerstyle players but the large majority of us that need more space between strings for open strings to ring through, it's a hell of a big deal.

Not a pretty look on an otherwise nearly new, binding rot-free vintage guitar.....no matter who made it. On many vintage guitars made this way, you can run your finger along the binding and feel a bump - the end of the tang - at every fret.

My '76 Super Axe prototype (made for Chet) has this and so did my '72 Super Chet, but new frets on the SC done properly have at least arrested the condition. My '98 6120 was built correctly so at least at some point if not the beginning - don't know - of Gretsch going back into business in the late '80's, this bad habit wasn't incorporated into it's building techniques and it isn't on any Gretsch built today that I'm aware of. Given the end results, it isn't a preference of building technique differences it's just a bad idea.


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