Vintage Gretsch Guitars

24.4” Gretsch Scale?

1

Picked up a fingerboard with neo-clasical thumb inlays for a project. Turns out it's 24.4 and not 24.75" scale. I am not aware of a model that used that scale. You? (edited for my scale error)

Thanks, Joe

2

All Gretsch guitars which are not 25.5 carry a 24.6 spec.

I'm unaware of any 24.75 Gretsch spec.

3

I think Tim may have made a typo. The pre-Fred III guitars mostly had 24.5" scales. Some, like country Clubs, had 25.5" scales. When Terada became involved 24.6" became the common scale. Some models had 25.5" scales.

With Gretsch everything is complicated.

Lee

4

Vintage = 24.5"; modern = 24.6".

Clubs, Falcons, Vikings and many of the early '50's Electros had 25.5". Synchro 160/200/300/400 had 26". Not aware of any acoustics (vintage) having anything less than 25.5" but some of the pre-war models may have had other specs.

5

I should have specified FMIC-era Gretsch guitars.

The larger point is that, to my knowledge, 24.75" has never been a scale Gretsch has used. If it ain't 25.5, it's 24.5 or .6. Which are closer to each other than either is to the Gibsonesque 24.75.

I don't know that these fractions of an inch make a significant difference in either tone or playability.

6

If it ain't 25.5, it's 24.5 or .6

aha!

Lee

7

Vintage = 24.5"; modern = 24.6".

Clubs, Falcons, Vikings and many of the early '50's Electros had 25.5". Synchro 160/200/300/400 had 26". Not aware of any acoustics (vintage) having anything less than 25.5" but some of the pre-war models may have had other specs.

– lx

Just measured my '41 Synchro 100 and it's 24.6"

8

Sorry for my general use of terms. In the Vintage Gibson world 24.625, 24.563 and 24.75 are all referred to as 24 3/4” scale. I’ve always just referred to Gretsch as the same. The board I have in my hand for all practical purposes is 24.4 which I referred to as 24.5” which it is not.

What is the scale of the Rambler?

9

Rambler is around 22.5".

10

I don't understand. Tell us about your project.

Lee

11

Well, here is some info for you! All my 50's Gretsch fingerboards are dead on 24.5" The 60's with fretted nuts I have here plus a Clipper from the 60's is actually 24.4". The board I have is a fretted nut rosewood board and is 24.4 (24.375 I think). I did not know that. Might be good to measure your 60's guitars and reply back if they are in fact 24.5 or 24.4. While that seems hardly significant on a moveable bridge guitar, they are not interchangeable between the two decades (different length fingerboard extension)

12

I've always preferred 24.5 over 24.6.

Really. I can feel it.

K

13

Both my Country Clubs are 25.5" scale( a 62 &64). I had an Elliot Easton for a few years and I think it was 25" or 25.5, I forget..

14

The main point of the post, at first was what is this 24.4" scale fingerboard I have here. Now its that it appears to be consistent with the 60's scale.

What I find interesting is that the fretted nut fingerboards are the same physical length as the previous un fretted nut boards. That I mean, that the wood dimensions are the same. The scale has been reduce by approximately the amount of wood required behind the fretted nut. So it seems to me that Gretsch may have had a full stock of fingerboards already cut to size. By adjusting the scale, they could use the same wood, with no changes to the stock. For the guitars with no fretted nut (like the Clipper or Anniversary), those fingerboard extensions are a little shorter to accommodate the scale change. (IE cut off the wood behind the fretted nut to use with a regular nut). Just a hunch, but seems logical.


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