Miscellaneous Rumbles

Why Music?

26

Something about the ability to shape sound. I want even very interested in music when I first picked up the guitar, but I was fascinated by the mechanics of it, the different sounds and the ability to control them. The music came later really.

Probably why I've always been as much interested in the equipment as the playing of it.

27

Like Crowbone said. Dad. Could sing like a bird.

Most of our records were full of sad songs though. Kris Kristofferson, Glen Campbell, Mario Lanza, Frank Sinatra, Elvis, Tom Jones, Shirley Bassey, Nina Simone, Nana Maskouri [who i ended up playing for] ABBA

28

As I believe we all should. Nice to hear from you, Strumm.

– Deed Eddy

It's a paraphrase of the final unforgettable line from Teddy Kennedy's eulogy for Bobby. More beautiful in its original now that I looked it up. He's quoting a line Bobby would repeat in speeches.

"Some men see the world as it is and ask why. I dream of things that never were and ask why not."

Before my time, I was born in '68. But I saw it in a documentary when I was young and it comes to mind every single time I come across those two words. It's a line with the simple profundity of prophecy. If only we all could walk that walk a little more of the time. In some sense, words such as these, with meter and cadence and content, are music as well.

29

Dad.

The family on dads side were all musical, father mother and all his brothers, ear players ,like myself. I can't remember a time when there wasn't any music in the house.

30

Fats Domino.

First music I recall hearing as a three year old in the late 60s was a Fats LP. It resonated with me and made me feel something deep down inside that even after all these years I still can't really identify or explain. It's still there today and whatever it is about that 1950s Big Beat its so intertwined with my DNA I know that it'll be there for the rest of my life.

I'm very thankful for that. Thanks Fats!!

31

Elvis via big Sis,s 45's. Then the Beatles, cemented the deal.

32

indianation65 2 hours ago: "Riding my Big Wheel as a child, in the house, and I heard my sister's album..."

Saw that and was sure you were going to go down a different road...

"Big wheels keep on turnin'.... "

33
Something about the ability to shape sound. ...the ability to control them. .

Your line reminds me of a fascinating thing that was said in a documentary about Thomas Edison. When Edison got his very first recording of a sound down on tinfoil, the documentary pointed out it was the first time in human history that a sound was actually heard again. That thought blew me away. Things could always be re-seen. Heck, I could look at a flower, close my eyes and see the same thing again. Smells could be experienced twice, taste and feel of things could all be done infinite times. But sound could not. Once a sound was made, it was gone forever...until Edison was able to actually capture sound. Think about that. We take it for granted now, but what Edison did was actually capture something as vaporous and fleeting as sound.

34
Something about the ability to shape sound. ...the ability to control them. .

Your line reminds me of a fascinating thing that was said in a documentary about Thomas Edison. When Edison got his very first recording of a sound down on tinfoil, the documentary pointed out it was the first time in human history that a sound was actually heard again. That thought blew me away. Things could always be re-seen. Heck, I could look at a flower, close my eyes and see the same thing again. Smells could be experienced twice, taste and feel of things could all be done infinite times. But sound could not. Once a sound was made, it was gone forever...until Edison was able to actually capture sound. Think about that. We take it for granted now, but what Edison did was actually capture something as vaporous and fleeting as sound.

– Spiritwalker

'No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.' -Heraclitus

I would argue that you could never see the same flower twice, nor taste the same Brussels sprout.

35

I could hear a sound, close my eyes and ears, and conjure its memory just as much as I could the sight of a flower or the smell of fresh olive oil, or the taste of honey, or the feel of wool. And one could always remake sound. Pluck the string again. Blow the horn again. Recite the line of Homer again.

The shaping of sound is our most primal expression. It's the first thing we do when born, make a sound. Hearing is also our first sensation. Floating in amniotic fluid, we don't feel much touch. Not much taste, as we are fed through the placenta, though some of us suck thumbs in the womb. We can sense light with our eyes as fetuses. But hearing is highly developed. We respond to particular voices in utero, and even to particular melodies.

36

I could hear a sound, close my eyes and ears, and conjure its memory just as much as I could the sight of a flower or the smell of fresh olive oil, or the taste of honey, or the feel of wool. And one could always remake sound. Pluck the string again. Blow the horn again. Recite the line of Homer again.

But is not your perception of the memory shaped by you experiencing the memory? You can't read Homer for the first time ever again.

37

'No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.' -Heraclitus

I would argue that you could never see the same flower twice, nor taste the same Brussels sprout.

– Otter

Oh, come on, man, you are thinking as a poet. Think as a fact-based man of science and reality -- before Edison you could not hear a sound twice. Period. Impossible to do.

Once again, I could see an image twice - see it, close my eyes, open my eyes, see that identical image. I could experience the feel of silk over and over again. I could smell and taste cinnamon over and over again. But before Edison you could not hear the sound of a book dropped again. It is gone in a flash, never to be heard again...that is until Edison found a way to physically capture sound. An astonishing idea that we just accept as the norm nowadays. One day someone is going to find a way capture dreams. That would be like what Edison did with sound. An incredible feat.

38

I tasted Brussells sprouts once.

That was more than enough.

39

Like several others here, I grew up in a musical family.... players and singers. My parents also had a huge record collection that was played a LOT. The styles covered all categories from old country, 30's/40's/50's pop through classical and opera.

40

The recording of a sound, especially on one of Edison's wax cylinders, is not identical to the sound. Any more than a painting of a flower is identical to the flower.

41

Oh, come on, man, you are thinking as a poet. Think as a fact-based man of science and reality -- before Edison you could not hear a sound twice. Period. Impossible to do.

Once again, I could see an image twice - see it, close my eyes, open my eyes, see that identical image. I could experience the feel of silk over and over again. I could smell and taste cinnamon over and over again. But before Edison you could not hear the sound of a book dropped again. It is gone in a flash, never to be heard again...that is until Edison found a way to physically capture sound. An astonishing idea that we just accept as the norm nowadays. One day someone is going to find a way capture dreams. That would be like what Edison did with sound. An incredible feat.

– Spiritwalker

Oh I don't question the importance of Edison's feat, just musing on the philosophical ramifications.

42

February 9, 1964.

– Ric12string

Yeah, that and I couldn't imagine anything else, so I never developed other skills. Boy, talk about putting all your eggs in one basket!

43

Instantaneous emotional gratification.

– F107plus5

For me, this, a thousand times over.

I can, through song, communicate emotionally what I am not capable of verbally.

44

The recording of a sound, especially on one of Edison's wax cylinders, is not identical to the sound. Any more than a painting of a flower is identical to the flower.

– Strummerson

Now you are being idiotic and argumentative. Either you like arguing or you are genuinely an idiot.

Here you say Edison really didn't capture the sound. Yet, in a previous post you said this: "I could hear a sound, close my eyes and ears, and conjure its memory...."

So you can't even pick a side of the argument you want to be on. On one hand you say a recording doesn't capture the sound and then on the other hand you say, "Oh, my memory can capture the sound." So your position on this thread is that sound can not be captured and sound can be captured. Amazing insight you've added here. Glad you took a stand. Hey, I bet you feel 2+2=4...and 2+2=3.

45

No need to revert to your terminal prickishness just because you can't stand being debunked from both sides. As usual, you are talking out of your trollish back door. And all you have is personal insult when challenged. You forward claims that are just the semblance of claims, but cannot bear cursory scrutiny. And if we don't embrace it we are being blah blah blah blah blah. I'm not being argumentative. You don't have an argument. Calling me names doesn't change that one bit. Your petty personal attacks and flailing tantrums neither inspire respect for your person nor do they serve any cogent discussion of the potentially interesting question you posed. Grow up. Or piss off.

46

Don't bother Strum. He was looking for a fight from post #1

47

And therein lies the reason the first post was flagged as Atomic, Radioactive, and Danger Will Robinson! But no, we all went there.

For me, I've really had it with the personal attacks. The somewhat gentle reminder Don't be a jerk doesn't seem to carry much weight with this particular poster. It's utterly boorish behavior, and anyone who has read Ian Fleming's works certainly understands what that means.

48

Dad's a pianist. Music is constantly played in the house. And these four lads in Liverpool... The King in Memphis and Chet's Fingerstyle LP and...

49
boorish behavior, and anyone who has read Ian Fleming's works certainly understands what that means.

I have indeed read Fleming's works, but the term "boorish" certainly does not apply to Mr. Fleming or his work. Rather "erudite," and "haughty" would be Fleming-esque.

I'm not boorish. I'm just a New Yorker. To dip into our political climate for a moment, one can be pro-Trump or anti-Trump but the thing that most of my countrymen fail to realize about Donald Trump is that he is a New Yorker. His behavior is just our way. Very common here. When one understands that, one can finally get a grip on Mr. Trump. Same for Spiritwalker. No harm intended towards others at all. Just the New York way.

50

Here's a true (verbatim) observation from my days on the road:

Columbus, Ohio Burger King: Hi, welcome to Burger King. May I take your order, please?

NYC, New York Burger King: C'mon, whaddaya want? I ain't got all day.

Trump would do far better with more Columbus.


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