Miscellaneous Rumbles

Who Likes The Bee Gees?

1

They've always have been a not at all guilty pleasure, though their earlier material has always been my favorite.

This new documentary called How Can You Mend A Broken Heart has given me a whole new respect for their later materiel, up to and including Saturday Night Fever.

Also, I never realized that Barry Gibb's speaking voice sounds like Sean Connery!

2

Saw him on Sunday Morning, thought he was going to say “suck it Trebek!” RIP.

3

I’ve been a big fan since their beginning. I even found a way to enjoy some of the disco era. It was just an R&B phase until they stuck it in that movie with Travolta. The documentary mercifully skipped the Sgt. Pepper movie part of the story. Peter Frampton would likely have it forgotten in his bio, too.

4

I watched that doc as well. Very good. I've always liked their early stuff, but I was firmly in the "Disco Sucks" crowd back in the day (at the same time, the Saturday Night Fever ST was the 2nd album I ever bought - because everybody did!). Later, I came to reassess some of the their disco-era music, and songs like "Jive Talkin'" which is really quite funky and a great song.

You have to respect their songwriting and hit-making abilities, and of course, their vocals and harmonies are second-to-none.

Interesting, though, that the doc doesn't even mention the Sgt. Pepper fiasco.

5

Also, I never realized that Barry Gibb's speaking voice sounds like Sean Connery!

It didn’t used to shhhound like that. Must be the dentures.

6

There are no words to adequately express my immediate and lifelong visceral revulsion at early Bee Gees and their affected tremulous whining. Sounded like the Andrews Sisters run through Dave Saville's varispeed - only without the testiclees - peddling transparently melodramatic treacle.

On the other hand, I came not to mind the disco era stuff: there was a lot more than the vocalisme going on, the chords and progressions were often reasonably sophisticated, and there were something like grooves. It really wasn't that far away from the R&B of the period. It's not that I would have chosen to listen to it on my own, but we played several BG hits in the band, and they both pleased audiences and gave us something to chew on. I even sang lead on "I Just Wanna Be Your Everything."

To say I liked disco BGs would be going too far, but it didn't drag its fingernails across the chalkboard of my soul like the 60s stuff.

I have to stop talking about it now, I'm getting anxious.

7

I even sang lead on "I Just Wanna Be Your Everything."

I know we're supposed to be nicer nice and all, but you got to be kidding me!

And yeah, bring THAT one to Nashville!

8

Early yup, later nope.

9

I do like the early work, and the documentary is great!

...------

10

Yup. Also Rupert Holme's piña colada song. And "Elvira." I've sung some epic stinkers.

11

Yup. Also Rupert Holme's piña colada song. And "Elvira." I've sung some epic stinkers.

– Proteus

Wish I had a time machine-- I bet the "Harmanized" versions of those are pure audio gold. Please tell me you also covered Holme's "Timothy" as well...

12

Wellsir, for whatever reason, I never had much interest in that song.


But please, continue the BeeGee festival. Never mind my (categorically correct) opinion.

13

Yup. Also Rupert Holme's piña colada song. And "Elvira." I've sung some epic stinkers.

– Proteus

Giddyuppa!

14

As a child of the’70s, the BeeGees were ubiquitous in my early memories of pop music. I really enjoyed the documentary and came away from it with a new respect for their knack for crafting a great pop song. And despite having grown up in a blue collar town where “Disco sucks!” was the path of least resistance, I can still enjoy the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack despite harboring a Lebowski level of revulsion towards the Eagles and the self-important coke-addled indulgences of Fleetwood Mac. I never need to hear another note from either of those bands again in my lifetime.

15

despite harboring a Lebowski level of revulsion towards the Eagles and the self-important coke-addled indulgences of Fleetwood Mac. I never need to hear another note from either of those bands again in my lifetime.

Agreed about the Eagles, but of course Fleetwood Mac prior to Buknix is consistently fine.

17

despite harboring a Lebowski level of revulsion towards the Eagles and the self-important coke-addled indulgences of Fleetwood Mac. I never need to hear another note from either of those bands again in my lifetime.

Agreed about the Eagles, but of course Fleetwood Mac prior to Buknix is consistently fine.

– Proteus

I'm glad you put in the "prior to Bucknix" disclaimer :)

18

i really enjoyed the earlier Bee Gees singles...i used to sing several of them. i thought their disco hits were rather silly, but harmless. i wouldn't go out of my way to listen to them, but i wouldn't change the station either.

19

Love the Bee Gees and their music, including the "disco" stuff -always have and proud to admit it. As someone else mentioned, the disco stuff was not far of R&B and even Barry Gibb has mentioned that. To me a good song is a good song.

We perform a couple of early hits such as Massachusetts and To Love Somebody in the duo and I do how Can you Mend a Broken Heart in my solo schtick.

Here's a link to our version of To Love Somebody: http://www.oncallband.net/a...

20

Yup. Also Rupert Holme's piña colada song. And "Elvira." I've sung some epic stinkers.

– Proteus

Wellllll..... have you ever heard the version that Rodney Crowell did? I agree that the hit stunk,so did Claptan's lame take on all of JJ Cale's tunes. To each his own.

21

I dig the Disco era stuff though I vehemently rejected it at the time. I was a young hippie and was supposed to hate disco, which most of it I did and still do. There was some real ridiculous music in that era. Disco Duck...or Kung Fu Fighting. Holy stupidity.

22

I dig the Disco era stuff though I vehemently rejected it at the time. I was a young hippie and was supposed to hate disco, which most of it I did and still do. There was some real ridiculous music in that era. Disco Duck...or Kung Fu Fighting. Holy stupidity.

– Suprdave

There has been some ridiculous music in every era and it continues to this day.

23

There has been some ridiculous music in every era and it continues to this day.

– Zigracer

Word.

You've got to take your hat off to the Bee Gees if only for their success and apparent longevity - they're still played regularly on the radio here, although not on the main current pop stations of course.

Personally I can take or leave the falsetto approach, but it was their thing and they did it extremely well. Superb songwriters with more than their own back-catalogue to prove it.

24

Yeah, Zig, You're right. Those were just extra special ridiculous, to me.

25

I like The Bee Gees. Talented, versatile, etc.

Good cover Zig.


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