Miscellaneous Rumbles

What makes ths song great? Boston - More Than a Feeling

1

The obvious answer is Scholz and Delp, but Rick Beato breaks down the details.

3

He manages to highlight more cool stuff about some of the music that I didn't pay much attention to back in the day. Thanks for posting this.

4

I love Rick Beato videos, watch them, get lost in living life and then stumble on another one that reminds me again! I always liked this song and knew there was a lot going on that was all pure talent. Listening Rick dissect it makes me laugh because he says things like "....you always notice those things in there but your like "is that a voice in there"...."

Thanks for posting beatbyrd as I will hesitate no longer and subscribe to his youtube page!

5

I’m a subscriber, Rick’s channel is of my fav’rites.

6

Very cool. The difference between listening and hearing.

Plus, he’s loaded with talent himself.

7

The obvious answer is Scholz and Delp, but Rick Beato breaks down the details.

– beatbyrd

So much fun. Thanks for posting. I love crawling inside this complex work of genius.

8

I'm a subscriber to Rick Beato's YouTube channel as well. I love the "what makes this song great" series.

9

Certainly a very well-crafted song, but it doesn't qualify as "great" in my book.

10

It certainly does make my “great” list. Tom may have had only one “great” song in him, but this one hits all of the buttons for me. Wonderful parts blended beautifully.

11

I was never really big on Boston, as a teenager at that time I would turn up the radio when they came on but I never bought any of their albums or learned any of their songs (I probably did manage to learn the intro, though).

And I have NEVER spent 25 minutes listening to someone break down a song on Youtube - that guys is AWESOME and I now have a real appreciation for that song and the band. Hearing his voice isolated from the band was real eye opener, well hearing each instrument isolated was a learning experience, but holy cow that voice.

Thanks for posting this

12

Nailed it!

Rick does a great job breaking this down. I have always appreciated everything going on, on those Boston albums and this song for sure. The great thing about music is a guy can break it all down like this and it doesn't take anything away from it. In fact, it makes me appreciate it even more.

13

Boston. Innovative, started a thing I won't hold them responsible for. Very high craft, no doubt. Gosh, perfect.

Sounds great ... but less filling.

I hate to bring it up, because my implied advocacy will elicit reactive resistance and ridicule from some quarters, but as Rick says, "what can you say?" This one ticks more boxes than I even knew I had.


I like Beato's analyses; his occasional long live-stream commiserations and conversations with his cohort have too little content amidst the chatter.

14

Beato's joy and energy are infectious. I've lost too many minutes watching his videos.

15

Man, he could have picked that YES song apart way more than he did but still wonderful. What does one use to break those parts down like that? I can't imagine a simple EQ would do it?

16

What does one use to break those parts down like that? I can't imagine a simple EQ would do it?

I'm thinking he must contact someone who has the masters (which have probably been transferred to digital more than once already), and ask for the files. Might pay something for it, or the rights-holders might consider it promotion to have Beato do his thing.

17

That sounds plausible but when I was in elementary school, I had a music teacher that had a unit that he could use to remove vocals from an album to have us sing along. I don't think the albums were anything special but he would just push one slider and remove the vocals. I always thought that was cool. Heck, that was in the 70's.

18

That generally works - at least in stereo - by removing anything that's in both channels equally, under the assumption (valid much of the time) that the vocals will be the loudest thing mixed that way. It also played hell on bass and kick drum, but those weren't as noticeable to folks whose main purpose was to sing along.

But I don't think that's what's going on here. Parts aren't being separated either by pan location in the mix, or by frequency. Sure sounds like the multi-track to me.

19

"What does one use to break those parts down like that? I can't imagine a simple EQ would do it?"

Maybe something like Roland R-Mix

20

The Skully 12 track it was recorded on.

21

Man, he could have picked that YES song apart way more than he did but still wonderful. What does one use to break those parts down like that? I can't imagine a simple EQ would do it?

– Suprdave

Record producers purchase (and trade) master recordings with one another. I don’t think they’re actual “masters”... but probably copies of ‘em.

22

I guess the main thing to take away from Rick Beato's analyses is that there can be something amazing even in songs you never really cared for. The craft evident in a song like this is truly impressive. Never liked the song but you can't deny the craftsmanship. A lot of music in the 70s was like that. There was a band here in Australis called Sherbet who were a big deal. Their songs were very well crafted and the funny thing is they were probably cleverer than 99% of the audience ever appreciated. I don't think their music has aged particularly well - you never hear it any more. But it was painstakingly put together and performed.

But craft alone doesn't make a great song. You can argue about whether More Than a Feeling is a great song or not - it was of its time and well recorded. Some songs don't need the trickery to be memorable and moving. There are times when all of the studio craft is just annoying, like (for me, anyway) in the music of Steely Dan or LRB. I'd rather listen to Sex Pistols.

23

"Never liked the song but you can't deny the craftsmanship. A lot of music in the 70s was like that." Agreed.

One thing that makes this song great is the Louie Louie thing.

24

I love these analysis series. One of my favorites: "And then we have the clown which hits the beer keg" from episode 68.

25

There are times when all of the studio craft is just annoying, like (for me, anyway) in the music of Steely Dan or LRB. I'd rather listen to Sex Pistols.

Well, the larger point is taken, though I beg to disagree with the examples - or at least Steely Dan. (Little River Band, I don't know. I haven't heard the albums, but at least the hits - to my ear - would survive as good material even with lower production values.)

But Steely Dan...yeah, from maybe Pretzel Logic forward, each album is better-engineered and produced than the one before. (A process of refinement which necessarily had to end when it reached virtual perfection with, say, The Royal Scam - after which the standards simply remained impossibly high.)

BUT that sheen and polish is only the ribbon on the package. The song forms and the parts stand on their own, rich not only in harmony and melodic integrity, but in all the content underneath. I can't think of any Steely Dan song that sounds better than it actually is, which is not the case with sheer fluff pop. The Steely Dan material stands up when played live, quite outside studio craft.

And all the studio craft in the world couldn't save weak material - as on several late-period Yes albums, which even I can only love mostly because it's the ongoing output of those guys, and then only by overlooking some pretty mediocre work.


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