Miscellaneous Rumbles

What Concerts Do You Wish You Could Forget?

26

Sonic Youth probably Goo tour. If you don’t know Sonic Youth, they do a lot of experimental noise stuff with alternate tunings to get drone effects and such. So basically every song gets a different guitar. Thurston Moore was so drunk he kept grabbing the wrong guitar and he’d get four chords into the song before realizing he had the wrong guitar and then he’d pick a fight with the roadie over it and by the time he got the right guitar the rest of the band had finished the song.

27

Drunks or druggies on stage are the worst, even worse than "angry" members.

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28

Drunks or druggies on stage are the worst, even worse than "angry" members.

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– indianation65

I saw the Pixies twice in the’90s; by the second time it was pretty clear that they all hated each other.

29

I'd already seen Cray empty a full hall at a NAMM show: Proteus

I actually witnessed him empty a dining room when he wasn't even inside.

Through some unfathomable connections I didn't know she had, the GM of the hotel where I was music manager (middle 1990s) secured a night with Robert Cray in the tiny bar (seats 100) of the place. He came as a solo, just him, a roadie with a tiny PA and one guitar amp. Set up in the bar and disappeared until showtime.

Meanwhile, in the larger restaurant down a flight of stairs, some eighty feet and three doors away from the bar, I was doing my thing on the grand pianna. Suddenly, at 2000 hrs (or 8:00 , if you prefer), we were jolted by the very loud wail of cranked Strat. It was literally so loud through the closed doors (down the stairs and down the hall) that it felt like the amp was sitting on my little Yammi baby grand!

The complaints started seconds later. Within a half hour, the dining room was all but empty, I'd quit my show in disgust (the Yam couldn't compete against the Strat's wail) and gone in search of the GM, who ultimately told me during one of Cray's breaks that Cray was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the hotel and why didn't I just stay and enjoy his show.

If I had, I would have added a significant percentage to the smallish crowd, composed mostly of off-duty bar staff and a few of the barflies places like that simply cannot get rid of.

I left. In fact, I almost quit over it, but common sense prevailed and the next evening, I was back behind the little Baby Yammi doin' my little thing.

But I was ultimately able to use my position as music manager to gain a manner of control of what happened entertainment-wise in the bar. Eventually, things smoothed over, and the GM and I are still friends all these years later.

30

I was going to talk about my disappointing Dylan experience but I figured others would chime in with similar experiences, and you guys delivered!

In short, we left half an hour into it.

31

Can’t think of a show I didn’t like. One that stands out was Humble Pie, no opening acts were promoted Montrose took the stage at 100mph, it was one of their first shows and the crowd was blown away.

Next up, Frampton’s Camel. I was expecting this to rock but it didn’t stand out, kinda artsy.

Humble Pie, what can I say, one of the best shows I’ve been to. Clem Clemson didn’t disappoint, great player.

I wouldn’t say Montrose stole the show but they killed for an unknown band.

12/8/1973 Indianapolis, IN, Fairgrounds Coliseum Humble Pie, Frampton’s Camel, Montrose 12/9/1973 Chicago, IL, International Amphitheater Humble Pie, Frampton’s Camel, Montrose

32

In about '72 I saw Neil Young at the Orlando Sports Stadium. It was basically a giant hanger building with generally awful sound in most cases. He was an hour late, played a 15 minute acoustic set,complaining the whole time,disappeared 45 minutes,came back on with his electric band and played maybe 2 songs and just left . Another stinker at the same venue had John Sebastian opening for of all things the Edgar Winter Band who always rocked the joint. Midway through Sebastion's decent set all bedlam broke out. Apparently a crowd outside the sold out show thought it their duty to storm the fence and the cops on the scene decided it was a riot,and dutifully brought it into the unaware stadium with a volley of teargas starting at the back and slowly working its way up front. Sebastion to his credit did his best to calm an already panicked crowd but the last thing I remember was seeing the gas hit him just before it got me. Somehow my buddy didn't get hit as bad as me and grabbed my arm to whisk me outa the place.

33

REM--October 24, 2008, Verizon Center, Grand Prairie/Dallas, Texas.

  • Let me first say, REM is my favorite band of all-time. They even surpassed KISS as my fave once I heard them in college. I do NOT, NOT regret seeing them, nor do I wish I could "forget" this show.

However, I'm writing and remembering it because if memories serves, they had a "juggler" as an opening act.

I know for a fact that one of my favorite "alternative/college'y" bands had a juggler. I believe it was at this show.

Addendum: REM was great that night, not as great as the 1987 Dallas Moody Coliseum show, but still awesome!

Addendum II: Bless the U.S. of America! Healing to all, and also to friends in others countries.

...+++

34

For me it’s not anyone I’ve seen, it was one of the concerts I played. I’ve got my cover band and we usually play some fun shows. A couple years ago a young woman, who is an amazing violinist, asked me to be part of a local show with her. She plays electric violin in a pretty incredible way. I was thrilled to be part of her band for this show and others to come. We rehearsed her original songs, which were an interesting assortment of world music. Many of them had some interesting time signatures. My roll as the guitar player was to provide atmospheric chords under her lead bits on the violin. I was quite happy and content with doing that. My big hollow bodied Gretsch with a Bigsby was right at home in that task. It was fun to play with controlled feedback using the Bigsby and effects for mood and texture. Very close to the time of the gig she had a personal crisis and canceled the show. The venue was not too happy. A couple days went by and she decided/was convinced to do the show. Problem is.... by this time the bass player had already committed to doing something else, and there was no time to get anyone else up to speed. So she asked me if I’d feel comfortable playing bass lines on the guitar as well as doing my atmospheric chord thing? Me being the gullible one sometimes.... said I’d give it a try.
Honestly, I was ok with a lot of it... but one song had a strange time change that I couldn’t get a handle on. I told her I didn’t want to do that song. She said ok. At the show we set up and did a sound check with THAT song and I smurfed up the part that always threw me off. She stopped the band and yelled and screamed at me. The owner of the place, a fellow musician looked very uncomfortable at how she was treating me. She went into full on ranting, controlling bitch mode.

She had me set my amp up on a table at pretty much head height to satisfy her controlling nature. I tried to explain that my 50watt Musicman was just fine on the floor and would do a better job of producing the bass notes she wanted.... but no it had to be right at my fricking head, so “she could hear me.” Anyway the show happened, I wish I would have given her the finger and walked off after the sound check.

My wife was there and was horrified by her behavior. She didn’t know how I put up with her bs! The owner of the club came up to me after the show and expressed concern for what I had just put up with. He told me I was welcome back but not her. It truly was a nightmare of an experience for me. She had turned into a mad woman minutes before the show. Come show time she came out in a Japanese kimono with a high slit up the front. People in the seated audience looked rather uncomfortable with her state of dress.... at the end of the show my wife let me know that the violinist was sans underwear. It was.... a rather strange and awkward experience all around. it was a lesson learned. Looking back I saw the signs before that night of her potential to become a raving lunatic. I should have payed attention to them and walked away before it came to show day where I played bass and guitar simultaneously for a lunatic, middle eastern inspired, half naked, violinist prodigy.

35

Friends dragged me to see Maroon 5 at Massey Hall back in the late 90s? (early 2000s?). They weren't "bad", they were worse: they were BORING. Competent, generic, soul-less.

Or it might have been one of those other late-90s alterna-stiff bands. Whatever.

36

Mr. Crowbone, I'm a huge Replacements fan. You saw them 6 times, and they were all bad?

Was it because of the band being drunk and indifferent to being professional?

I'm curious.

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– indianation65

Sorry to say, yes, they were horrible. I put the blame firmly on Paul, as he didn't seem to mind that he was off key, off lyric, off his nut drunk, high, whatever.

Tommy, more than once, came up to his mic and shouted " This mic works" shaming Paul into singing.

I'm of the mind that when people come to see you play your tunes, and pay money to do so, that's a huge compliment, and should be treated as such, so when someone drunk or not, can't be bothered to do what they're getting paid to do, that's a disrespect I can't abide.

So when I saw the Mats playing a few years back and read that Paul wore "code" shirts that wound up saying something to the effect of I'm Not Whoring My Songs Anymore, I wasn't the least bit surprised or concerned. Good riddance, and I was left mad and sad.

37

Black Sabbath, original lineup in the late 70's, burning crosses on the stage, you know the devil shtick. Way too loud, solos too long, and really evil vibe. And I'm not religious in the least, just a bad vibe from the audience. I walked.

Eric Clapton with Muddy Waters opening late 70's. Muddy was great. Eric Clapton just plain blew. Could hardly get through his songs. Obviously drunk. In his Clapton biography he even mentions that particular show as one of the lowest points in his career. I agree totally with him.

– Daniel Weldon

I second the Clapton/Waters tour.

The white confetti deployed during “Cocaine” was an embarrassment.

38

Sorry to say, yes, they were horrible. I put the blame firmly on Paul, as he didn't seem to mind that he was off key, off lyric, off his nut drunk, high, whatever.

Tommy, more than once, came up to his mic and shouted " This mic works" shaming Paul into singing.

I'm of the mind that when people come to see you play your tunes, and pay money to do so, that's a huge compliment, and should be treated as such, so when someone drunk or not, can't be bothered to do what they're getting paid to do, that's a disrespect I can't abide.

So when I saw the Mats playing a few years back and read that Paul wore "code" shirts that wound up saying something to the effect of I'm Not Whoring My Songs Anymore, I wasn't the least bit surprised or concerned. Good riddance, and I was left mad and sad.

– crowbone

Ha, no show crowbone, this show rocked and a Gretsch 12 was used but later turned into toothpicks in Europe.

39

It must of been around the spring of 1981, a group of friends convinced me to see the Rolling Stones at Candlestick Park. The opener, George Thorogood, and the Stones were great as far as I can remember. The in between band scarred me. It was the J Geils Band, the harmonica was a loud screech the whole set, fingers on chalkboard stuff. It's only been the last 8 years or so that I have been able to tolerate/enjoy a band when they brought out the harmonica for a song.

In '78 or so I saw Angel at the Long Beach Arena (now an aquarium). I don't remember anything of the show. I just wish I could forget that I went.

40

Moody Blues, Wolf Trap, around 2004. It was a company outing and we were seated on the lawn very distant from the stage. Everyone but me wanted to drink wine and gab while I really wanted to focus on the music. It was a very disappointing experience.

In the mid-70's I walked out on the Allman Brothers show at the old Memorial Coliseum in San Antonio. ZZ Top had opened (this was of course before their 80's popularity) and I simply got bored with three chord blues tunes.

41

A big Amboy Dukes fan, I went to see Nugent in ‘77. We walked out halfway thru Cat Scratch Fever.

The unknown opening band (RUSH) changed my approach to drumming forever.

42

I saw Kenny G with (my then g-friend-now wife of 26 yrs) and it sucked so bad - I mean it flat out hurt my ears - and we unfortunately got into a huge fight over it as we left early due to my dissatisfaction. I behaved poorly, I acknowledged and apologized, but it truly did suck. Say NO to Kenny G concerts if you have a chance.

– BigJImSlade

Say no to ANYTHING to do with Kenny G. If they play anything of his on the radio, I immediately change the station.

Some years ago there was a joke circulating that went "You're stuck in an elevator with Saddam Hussein, Osama Bin Laden and Kenny G. You have a gun but only two bullets. What is the right thing to do? (Answer) Shoot Kenny G twice, just to make sure."

There isn't a single concert I wish I had missed. The worst performance I ever saw was Captain Beefheart at Winterland around 1972-1973. Beef was drunk, the band was sloppy, and nothing they played had any feel at all --- only time in my life I've ever booed a performer. But they were only the middle act. Afterwards the Mahavishnu Orchestra came out and lifted the place to the heavens, so it was still a memorable show.

43

Mr. Powdog, Ted Nugent in '77 was still a young man, a hungry RnR disciple, and you walked out?

What was the reason, was it "his" actual performance?

I'm a huge Nugent fan, and I would have loved to see him anytime from '75-83 or so!

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44

I bought tickets for Karolyn and her sister to go to Michael Bolton. I figured they would enjoy. The day of the show, her sister came down ill so I had to accompany her. I was dreading this from the get go but to my surprise, when we arrived, it was a sight to see. Mostly women, probably 99.5 % of the entire crowd. The smell of cheap perfume and hair spray was thick but I've never seen so much skin in my life. Karolyn had to keep reminding me that I didn't need to smile so much. I reminded her, I was there for her and kept smiling.

So we sat down for the show and the lights came down and a comedian came on. Okay, the opening act is a comedian. That's different but entertaining either way, so I was okay with it. They almost immediately began to boo him off stage and shout Bolton's name. He replied, "Hey girls calm down...He isn't even here yet." they responded with boo and more yelling of Mr. Bolton's name. He had to stop again and try to explain that Michael had a show in St. Louis the day before and blew his voice out. He is on his way but hasn't arrived yet because he was held up with a Doctor, which was later explained by Michael in detail that he was receiving injections in his neck. (UGH!)

So Michael began to sing and about a 3rd of the way through the show, he requested a break. He left the stage and his band became alive. The Bass player began to thump and pop and the whole band became a Jazz band that was rocking the stage. The hilarious part was that it had me up on my feet yelling and cheering with a bunch of disappointed women eyeing me like a prostitute in church. Those guys were KILLING IT! One of the best bands I'd ever heard. I finally came to my senses and just sat down and enjoyed more of that before Michael returned.

Not the absolute worst show I'd been to but I've seen local screamo bands so there's that.

45

Ha, no show crowbone, this show rocked and a Gretsch 12 was used but later turned into toothpicks in Europe.

– Curt Wilson

That figures!

But if I went, he would've made sure to keep his record intact!

46

I had no choice but to hear Nugent in the spring of ‘75. I don’t know if he was billed as Amboy Dukes, or Ted Nugent band, but it was in that period of time between the commercial visibility of the two - when half the listening population said Ted WHO? and the other half said Yeah, Journey to the Center of the Mind, sixties hit, remember?

He’d been hired by Ohio Wesleyan University’s student entertainment committee for an outdoor Saturday afternoon gig. The band set up on a portable stage in a stand of trees in the grassy knoll between Stuyvesant Hall and another dorm. Since I lived on the second floor of Stuy, windows facing the grassy knoll, there was no escape.

It was a bit startling to be wakened shortly after noon by the whacking, tuning, and TESTING123ing of a sound check, but otherwise I didn’t mind, exactly. I’d liked the Dukes, and still consider Survival of the Fittest one of the great live albums in rock - but the “show” was plenty loud and I could see the band without leaving my room, so I didn’t.

They must’ve done “Journey,” but I don’t remember a single thing about the gig.

Dude can still play, and his leads are often witty and entertaining, but I’ve never had the first iota of use for the dumbed-down crotch rock of his subsequent career.

48

Mr. Powdog, Ted Nugent in '77 was still a young man, a hungry RnR disciple, and you walked out?

What was the reason, was it "his" actual performance?

I'm a huge Nugent fan, and I would have loved to see him anytime from '75-83 or so!

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– indianation65

In 1977 I was a young man too, much more critical and impatient than I am now. I was still high on this record when he started writing stuff like Cat Scratch Fever, Wango Tango and the like. Guess I saw it as a cheap sellout and a lowering of the bar. Plus, I had just seen Rush for the first time.

I did see him play Hibernation and Living In The Woods before departing. And now in my wiser and older age, I still think Cat Scratch Fever sucks.

49

BB King circa 1995...

What a thrill it was to see a legend walk out on stage...and promptly sit down. Now, I get it...I'm not faulting him for sitting...it's what he did while he sat,which was pretty much nothing.

Every song started and ended with "I wrote this in 1958 on a bus to Tallahassee" etc. Every Song! Then he'd start telling a random story that had nothing to do with the song right smack dab in the middle. But that's not the worst. He had a second guitarist that did all the heavy lifting. The second guitarist was really good but hidden way in the back. He'd play some smoking leads and then BB would play a 3 note lick and start in with another story. "The thrill is gone...I recorded that in 1969...yeah the thrill is gone baby...(Guitar: wah wah), it was a big hit for me".

Lastly, about 45 minutes into the show he was like "well, I guess I'm getting tired so this is gonna be the last song"...other guy plays 99% of the song.

To be fair, I think he was having some health problems at the time but I had hoped for more.

50

I'd say Ted Nugent writes and sings more about "nature, hunting, freedom, independence, etc.," than he does about "getting laid," but if we're going to judge the Motor City Madman's music due to being too much "tits and ass," subject matter, then we may as well judge just about every rocker who ever lived.

I still would have loved to see the Nuge when he was young!

Addendum: My favorite era is the "Charlie Huhn" era, even over Derek St. Holmes, but both were good singers. Ted's voice, well, not so hot, but writing and playing licks was his peak.

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