Miscellaneous Rumbles

Well whadayaknow? Carrots never used to be orange!

1

I just discovered that in nature carrots used to be white, yellow, purple or red - but not orange. Yet when i go to the supermarket or vege market all I see are orange carrots. Apparently it was the Dutch in the 16th century who bred orange carrots for some celebration or other - orange is the national colour of the Netherlands...

I love finding out about the history of food. French fries should probably be called Belgian fries, Italian food must have been vastly different before tomatoes arrived from the new world, and ciabata was only invented in the 80s, it is not a traditional Italian bread. How quickly food habits change.

Do you still eat like your parents did when you were a kid? I sure don't!

2

I think the carrot thing was to honor the Duke of Orange. Genetic modification of crops is nothing new, it just to be much slower and couldn't use frog DNA.

I understand that French cuisine only became a big deal when Catherine De Medici came over from Italy and brought her taste and chefs with her.

I grew up on a diet of canned vegetables and ground round. My school lunches were often Cheez Whiz sandwiches on white bread, which I'm not sure is even food...

3

Yes, but the Amboy Dukes posed the question, "Why is a carrot more orange than an orange" in a song on their first (I think) album.

4

With French fries the French part refers to the cutting technique it is also known as julienne cut.

6

With French fries the French part refers to the cutting technique it is also known as julienne cut.

– Mr Tubs

You win the prize today. Most people are totally unaware of that fact. "Frenching" refers to the cutting technique... unrelated to a method of kissing, or to a nation in general.

7

As a child of a broken home, imagine the relief my sisters and I felt when Mom split, and we never had to eat a Lime Jello Tuna Casserole again.

And yes, it really was a thing in my house, and yes, it's as disgusting as you'd might imagine.

8

Could have been worse...

Do a google image search on the word "aspic" and prepare for a whole world of horrors to unfold before your eyes.

9

Could have been worse...

Do a google image search on the word "aspic" and prepare for a whole world of horrors to unfold before your eyes.

– Afire

I think if you add one more "s" into your google search, you'll get a whole different perspective-- so be sure and spell "aspic" correctly the first time, or else...

And considering the title of this thread, It's probably high time that someone started a "SPAM wasn't always pink" thread. Referring to the pseudo-meat product of course, not email trash.

By the way Crowbone, this looks to be right up your culinary alley... If only I hadn't lost my recipe for "Spam & succotash tarts"...

10

I probably haven't had spam in over 20 years, but I can say that as a kid, I had nothing against a fried Spam sandwich. I might have to introduce my daughter to it.

11

I think if you add one more "s" into your google search, you'll get a whole different perspective-- so be sure and spell "aspic" correctly the first time, or else...

And considering the title of this thread, It's probably high time that someone started a "SPAM wasn't always pink" thread. Referring to the pseudo-meat product of course, not email trash.

By the way Crowbone, this looks to be right up your culinary alley... If only I hadn't lost my recipe for "Spam & succotash tarts"...

– Tartan Phantom

Haha!

Planked Spam is what they're serving tonight for dinner in the rehab center!

12

Always loved me some Larks Tongue in Aspic.

13

Always loved me some Larks Tongue in Aspic.

– Proteus

The Progger Special

14

Corn used to be blue, not yellow!

15

I've been vegetarian for over 43 years now, so not a bit like my parents' cuisine. Although my dad made really good spaghetti sauce from scratch, and because he had a lot of Chinese and Japanese friends at work (who recommended some really good restaurants not geared to tourists), I got hipped to vegetables being capable of flavor and texture other than canned mush pretty early on. Thanks, Pop!

16

Queens Anne's Lace or feral carrot?

17

Queens Anne's Lace or feral carrot?

– sleepy

Umm.. as long as you don't confuse it with poison hemlock (which itself should not to be confused with the incorrectly named "hemlock" tree)... which is also in the carrot family and looks very much like feral carrot.

18

Spam, spam, spam, spam, spam, spam....

Ah, memories. Mom never did aspics or Jell-O nonsense---fruit in Jell-O was OK. Lots of good Polish soul food instead. Spam's not too bad when breaded (or corn meal) and fried lightly. It's just another type of pork sausage. It's far better than borscht. Thin, vinegary beet soup with a hambone for flavor. The only good part of it was Mom's dumplings. It was a staple during the strikes at Studebaker in the '50s. Strike pay wasn't much---worse than unemployment.

19

Haha!

Planked Spam is what they're serving tonight for dinner in the rehab center!

– crowbone

I know the history of Hawaii's love affair with spam. War shortages, GI's leaving it with Island girlfriends etc. Spam and everything, spam Musube's..etc... You would think in 70 freakin years, they would have come to their senses... I got a call about an hour ago..."Eh, I wen to the Sack and Save and got Lobster tails and a couple cans of spam".. I kid you not. Vile as it is, there are haiku's about it here...

20

Growing up on a farm with a father who loved food, we generally ate well, although somewhat conservatively. I'd heard of spam, but in Nova Scotia we had something called Klik and I think another one named Kam, probably the same as Spam, and we did have it once in a while. It was curious stuff; ya kind of wondered if it was really meat or something else. Carrots were orange for sure; never had a purple carrot until I grew one myself with the varietal name of Purple Haze; ah, the 60's.

After high school, in between rock bands, I worked as a seaman and discovered different foods in the port cities of the east coast. The ships were of British registry and in the ship's letters (seaman's contract with the company) the minimum amount of curry to be served on a monthly basis was stipulated in writing; a holdover from colonial times before refrigeration when the meat would have been heavily salted or rotten. I had never eaten curry at home.

21

We had Klik and Kam in Ontario too. My mother used to get it on occasion. It did appear to be a 'mystery' meat of some kind! My mother would cook it in a huge iron frying pan with left over potatoes chopped up and a big Spanish onion - hateful hot things they were! - salt and pepper and call it her version of corned beef hash.....couldn't afford a can of corned beef. Had sort of the same texture and plenty of fat in it! Sure was tasty though. I'll see what they sell here in BC next trip to the Stupidstore.

22

I never had a problem with Spam. Dad was a marine, and liked to fry it up as a bacon alternative with eggs every now and again.

23

Spam has a surprisingly short list of ingredients. Pork (shoulder and ham), salt, water, sugar, potato starch and sodium nitrate. Doesn't sound that vile to me.

24

Maybe I'm weird, but that aspic stuff doesn't look half bad. Reading up, it sounds like gravy mixed with veggies

25

Otter, it is a stretch to describe aspic as “gravy mixed with veggies.” All aspic dishes are served cold, as the items are suspended in a flavored gelatin.

Ick, and more ick.


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