Miscellaneous Rumbles

Turned 52 so I’m doing an executive fight night…

1

Hey guys,

A local guy talked me into an executive fight night. Three rounds for a charity to fight cancer.

So...

Back in training at the tender age of 52!

Most of the guys are younger, but hey... I may be old, but I'm slow.

At any rate, it's for a local foundation that is raising money for cancer patients. If you want to donate (does not matter how little), here is the link--and you'll see my mug while it's still pretty.

K

https://stworzmistrza.pl/ca...

2

Uh, good luck? Hope you dont ruin any of your guitar playing parts.

And ... "First rule of Executive Fight Night ... don't talk about Executive Fight Night."

3

Ha ha ha.

I'm worried about my hands and wrists. I stopped messing with boxing, martial arts and much in between almost 10 years ago as my hands had gotten in too bad of shape to play.

But...

I just couldn't help myself.

I've been back in training over the past month, stuck to light bags and heavy, pillow gloves and the double-ended bag, and I'm quite happy with getting back the pop. It's clear what they say is true in that I am having a hard time with getting any kind of head movement back, and I may be a sitting duck for the other guys in the fight night (all of whom are at least 15 years younger), but I figure I have experience on them.

Anyway, when I was a kid my first idol was Ali, so if I need to I can pump the jab and circle... for a couple of rounds at least.

I think I can anyway.

K

4

Good for you! I have a close friend who trained martial arts for close to thirty years. At 54, he’s still the guy that his instructor sends in to spar with the twenty year old kids who are headed into competition because he doesn’t make the mistakes that the other twenty year olds do. At the youthful age of 48 I decided to get back to mountain bike racing. Been hitting the indoor trainer at 5 a.m. every morning since October. It’s been fifteen years since I went at it this hard. The recovery time is a little longer than it used to be …

6

Yeah--it's been a while for me too. I find that it's true--you really do lose head movement and your "bounce." Hand speed and power generally stays, but I really do not need to get hit a lot, heh heh.

We'll see!

K

9

So are you saying the two words are equivalent, and to use both in proximity is redundant?

11

You’re nuts.

– Proteus

Your nuts!

Protect them!

12

Protect yourself at all times. After all, no one wants to die in a recliner.

13

Bring a machete. Make it fair.

14

Always remember: old age and treachery overcome youth and ability every time! (I say that because I know darn well if I don't win in the first minute and a half, I'm toast!) Good luck!

15

I agree, don't do it. Makes no sense. Executive fight night? No way.

I come from a family of boxers...love it. Used to do it. But the idea of boxing for charity....? It begs many questions? How do you fight? What I mean by that is how can you hold back a punch? Do you really want to hit a guy in the gut where his spleen might rupture? Boxing is not a sport that can be done partially. If you hold back, then how do you know the other guy will? And if both of you just hold back and pitty-pat each other...what's the point? Why not just have a Darts Or Bowling Executive Night?

I do not get involved in those work softball games or basketball games. I certainly would never ever think of getting involved in a boxing work event. With basketball or softball I am always afraid of hurting somebody else. You step up to the plate and the job is to hit the ball; but suppose I hit a line drive right at the pitcher's skull? Suppose in basketball I guard a guy going up for a shot and he comes crashing down onto the hard floor on his head? But how can you play these sports without trying to hit the ball or guard a guy? The only answer is don't play. Boxing? Man, that's another level. How can you box and expect someone to not get hurt?

Dude, bail out. This ain't a good thing. You are going to hit a thirty year old a bit too hard, he's going to get angry and then hit you harder and then it is two guys trying to hurt each other. And someone will get hurt. I used to fight my older brother a lot. It often turned into barbarity -- two brothers trying to bloody each other. It was dumb. Boxing can only be done for real against an opponent who understands the sport as you do. Boxing ain't a friendly game of Monopoly (and, hell, I've even seen games of Monopoly turn vicious).

16

Wouldn't it be easier to just buy a red Ferrari or something?

17

Sorry, but don't get it. I have a niece that just started college. She has this big Broadway voice. Anyway, her mother se t me a video of her singing the National Anthem for a fraternity fight night. My reaction was, "Seriously?!". After all the bad publicity from having deaths, etc., the universities allow. Something like that? The irony was my sister shared the fact that a family friend's son knocked his opponent out in the 1st round.

18

Gee, it just might be fun getting the sh*t knocked out of you for charity, What's the cause? support for abused women?

19

Next to the research that proved how all facets of smoking and second hand smoke is an extreme risk to human health, research into concussions, particularly from boxing, then football then hockey, is just about as extensive. In hockey, Rick Nash announced his retirement from hockey yesterday due to the effects from his last concussion, and he isn't even middle age!

It'll only take one punch and it may not even be that hard for you to be getting coloring books and crayons for the rest of your life, and I'm not trying to be funny.

20

Gee, it just might be fun getting the sh*t knocked out of you for charity, What's the cause? support for abused women?

– WinnieThomas

Concussion research.

21

I keep thinking of the old Twilight Zone episode where boxing had been banned. Nowadays, I'm inclined to agree with that.

22

Sorry for not responding--was at training and then crashed (time difference).

All good points, some that will probably make me worry.

The logic (albeit probably flawed) goes as follows:

1) I love boxing. I was fairly obsessed with it growing up, but despite learning from pros, great coaches (mostly Mexican) and being in gyms my whole life, my parents were not down for Golden Gloves or anything serious. Which, I admit, is probably a good thing. Since getting out of mixed martial arts training and boxing about a decade ago, not being in the gym, hitting the bags, and yes, sparring, has about driven me crazy. I'm in very, very good shape, but time remains unbeaten and I figure this is about the last time I'll ever do this.

2) It's for a good cause. Lot of cancer over here and any donation helps. I'm at the age where I'm seeing friends go down (a couple younger than me) and worse, their kids.

3) The reality is that it will be very good for my business (detective agency). The business world this side of the pond (and I mean all of Europe, despite what Americans probably think) is outrageously testosterone-based. This actually repels me--and it favors nepotism, chauvinism, etc.--but it is the reality I live in. On the flip side, 99 percent of it is fake. Most of the big, swinging d___s are delicate as feathers. It's all a front. I'm not a front, however, and some of my client base needs to see this. That may sound infantile (and yes, I will enjoy the ride), but it is what it is. I'm hoping that first, a bunch of them sign up (big talk, but not that many signees among the expat business community yet, and they are the worst when it comes to the big show routine) so that they can meet the real me in training and on fight night. This may sound primitive to you, but it is what it is. I also deal in very primitive things. Theft, surveillance, mafia scams, dealing with prosecutors and what I call "conflict resolution" jobs.

Again, it is what it is. (As long as I don't get knocked out!).

4) Actually, stats-wise, a couple of you are wrong. Professional boxing does have a high concussion risk/long-term risk, but amateur boxing has proven much safer than American football, hockey, etc. If you grow up with a bad coach who has you sparring every day, then yes, the stats go out the window, but I would much rather see my kid in a boxing program than a football program (also because I believe football promotes running over smaller people, the 'gang' mentality, might-makes-right, etc.. In boxing, you are on your own and have to stand and face the music yourself). At any rate, years ago as an investigative journalist I did quite a bit of research on this, wrote a story that detailed stats (such as the fact that the average injury rage puts one life-changing/debilitating injury in every single high school football game played--and this combined with the expense of football programs is fairly insane).

There is risk of injury (and yes, of getting concussed), and that risk will probably be highest during training, as there will be mostly newbies (and they are the ones that lose their minds). I'm okay with that though. I can move. I have extremely fast hands. I seriously doubt anyone there, regardless of age, can beat me to a punch. Nobody every could but guys in the "seriously shooting for the Olympics" range. You do lose your head movement, and I may have to go either Ali (circle and run) or Floyd (Philly shell), but I can do that too. I've lost a hair (I can feel it on the double-ended bag), but the speed and pop is still there. I'm also ambidextrous, so I can fight ortho or southpaw or switch whenever I want.

Sure, I may get rocked out of the ring. There is always that risk, but I'm okay with it. And no, I won't try to hurt anyone. I don't want to put everything into my punches anyway, as my hands are a mess from years of this.

But yeah, I wish I could afford a red Ferrari. That might make more sense.

K

23

Sorry for not responding--was at training and then crashed (time difference).

All good points, some that will probably make me worry.

The logic (albeit probably flawed) goes as follows:

1) I love boxing. I was fairly obsessed with it growing up, but despite learning from pros, great coaches (mostly Mexican) and being in gyms my whole life, my parents were not down for Golden Gloves or anything serious. Which, I admit, is probably a good thing. Since getting out of mixed martial arts training and boxing about a decade ago, not being in the gym, hitting the bags, and yes, sparring, has about driven me crazy. I'm in very, very good shape, but time remains unbeaten and I figure this is about the last time I'll ever do this.

2) It's for a good cause. Lot of cancer over here and any donation helps. I'm at the age where I'm seeing friends go down (a couple younger than me) and worse, their kids.

3) The reality is that it will be very good for my business (detective agency). The business world this side of the pond (and I mean all of Europe, despite what Americans probably think) is outrageously testosterone-based. This actually repels me--and it favors nepotism, chauvinism, etc.--but it is the reality I live in. On the flip side, 99 percent of it is fake. Most of the big, swinging d___s are delicate as feathers. It's all a front. I'm not a front, however, and some of my client base needs to see this. That may sound infantile (and yes, I will enjoy the ride), but it is what it is. I'm hoping that first, a bunch of them sign up (big talk, but not that many signees among the expat business community yet, and they are the worst when it comes to the big show routine) so that they can meet the real me in training and on fight night. This may sound primitive to you, but it is what it is. I also deal in very primitive things. Theft, surveillance, mafia scams, dealing with prosecutors and what I call "conflict resolution" jobs.

Again, it is what it is. (As long as I don't get knocked out!).

4) Actually, stats-wise, a couple of you are wrong. Professional boxing does have a high concussion risk/long-term risk, but amateur boxing has proven much safer than American football, hockey, etc. If you grow up with a bad coach who has you sparring every day, then yes, the stats go out the window, but I would much rather see my kid in a boxing program than a football program (also because I believe football promotes running over smaller people, the 'gang' mentality, might-makes-right, etc.. In boxing, you are on your own and have to stand and face the music yourself). At any rate, years ago as an investigative journalist I did quite a bit of research on this, wrote a story that detailed stats (such as the fact that the average injury rage puts one life-changing/debilitating injury in every single high school football game played--and this combined with the expense of football programs is fairly insane).

There is risk of injury (and yes, of getting concussed), and that risk will probably be highest during training, as there will be mostly newbies (and they are the ones that lose their minds). I'm okay with that though. I can move. I have extremely fast hands. I seriously doubt anyone there, regardless of age, can beat me to a punch. Nobody every could but guys in the "seriously shooting for the Olympics" range. You do lose your head movement, and I may have to go either Ali (circle and run) or Floyd (Philly shell), but I can do that too. I've lost a hair (I can feel it on the double-ended bag), but the speed and pop is still there. I'm also ambidextrous, so I can fight ortho or southpaw or switch whenever I want.

Sure, I may get rocked out of the ring. There is always that risk, but I'm okay with it. And no, I won't try to hurt anyone. I don't want to put everything into my punches anyway, as my hands are a mess from years of this.

But yeah, I wish I could afford a red Ferrari. That might make more sense.

K

– Konrad

Well said Konrad. Good luck !

24

Good for you Konrad. It seems to me that you've considered this carefully and with your boxing and MMA background, you know full well what you're getting into.

Having never been involved in any type of sport, I started kyokoshin karate 4 weeks before my 39th birthday. My son was a member of the club and I figured it would be a shared interest with added health benefits.

I'm a 54 year old 2nd Dan now and still enjoying it for the most part. I don't bother with the rough stuff any more and when sparring I keep it light. But that's just me and some of my contemporaries still get a kick out of the knock down stuff - pun intended.

Train hard and fight easy, and I wish you all the best

25

He's simply fighting the aging process gracefully, except without the "graceful" part.

Good luck...

Post the fight soon after.

...------


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