Miscellaneous Rumbles

Tru-Arc new tech secrets?

3

Hey João,

You must have missed this thread

– Suprdave

Oops... Thanks, Dave! I’ll join the party overthere

;)

4

João, in short...I doubt there will be Proteus Tru-Arcs.

I know the question is mostly drily humorous, depending on the coincidence of an unconscionable appropriation of my long-time GDP screen name and my role as midwife of a metal product, but any "new" material does attraction my attention, so I'll answer seriously.

I like the notion of somehow combining ceramics and metal (though I don't know how strict the inventors are about the definitions of either term), and given that glass proved a viable bridge material, I've long wondered what the acoustic properties of ceramic would be.

As it happens, one of my Other Brothers is an engineer with ceramic experience as part of a wider specialty in handling heat inside internal combustion engines. He has the CAD experience to generate engineering drawings for a bridge (which must be pretty simple by comparison to chambering inside an engine block).

With such drawings, one could presumably have either ceramic or this Proteus material cast.

But the Brother who actually makes Tru-Arcs is all about bending and machining metals - not casting anything. I'd be looking for another source for any cast product. Not that I couldn't find someone - but I'm betting there would be some serious costs for prototypes before I could even evaluate the acoustic performance of such materials.

I don't have any concerns about ceramic or Proteus standing up to the string pressure over the bridge - guys have had glass bridges in use for several years now, and never a report of any failure.

But still - with the couple dozen variations on the physical design of the bridge to accommodate just Gretsch bridge configurations (several hole shapes and diameters, at least five different hole spacings; three bottom profiles; and several compensation patterns)...it just gets too daunting. Each would require a separate cast (with the development costs for moulds) - and which combination of specs would I start with?

So...the only way Tru-Arcs made of Proteus will happen is if the shop is so fascinated and curious that they conceive an independent passion to experiment. That's mighty unlikely.


As a purely personal aside, it's curious to me that my three brothers all have engineering and fabrication expertise in various materials. One specializes in metal, one in ceramic applications, the other largely in woodworking as a high-end high school "industrial arts" teacher (whatever they call that now).

But not me. When given the square-peg-in-round-hole test in junior high, to determine who had the aptitude for "shop" class, mine came back with a notation something like don't let this kid NEAR a tool. So, given my relative strengths in academics (other than math!), it was obvious I was bound for the liberal arts - despite a serious lifelong interest in science and technology.

So I'm free to flit about having ideas, mostly unencumbered by the constraints of reality. Sometimes others see fit to bring the practical ideas I occasionally generate to life - but not often!

One of my great ongoing frustrations in life is the vast gulf between the conception of a fabulous idea - and the various physical and procedural constraints one encounters, the tedious drudgery one must endure, and the many unanticipated hurdles one has to clear to actually realize (or really actualize) that conception.

In other words, in my mind this is already done, and it's perfect; what the hell is wrong with reality?


Also, the party in the other thread is just my speed - not much happening other than an ongoing demonstration of strict social distancing.

5

João, in short...I doubt there will be Proteus Tru-Arcs.

I know the question is mostly drily humorous, depending on the coincidence of an unconscionable appropriation of my long-time GDP screen name and my role as midwife of a metal product, but any "new" material does attraction my attention, so I'll answer seriously.

I like the notion of somehow combining ceramics and metal (though I don't know how strict the inventors are about the definitions of either term), and given that glass proved a viable bridge material, I've long wondered what the acoustic properties of ceramic would be.

As it happens, one of my Other Brothers is an engineer with ceramic experience as part of a wider specialty in handling heat inside internal combustion engines. He has the CAD experience to generate engineering drawings for a bridge (which must be pretty simple by comparison to chambering inside an engine block).

With such drawings, one could presumably have either ceramic or this Proteus material cast.

But the Brother who actually makes Tru-Arcs is all about bending and machining metals - not casting anything. I'd be looking for another source for any cast product. Not that I couldn't find someone - but I'm betting there would be some serious costs for prototypes before I could even evaluate the acoustic performance of such materials.

I don't have any concerns about ceramic or Proteus standing up to the string pressure over the bridge - guys have had glass bridges in use for several years now, and never a report of any failure.

But still - with the couple dozen variations on the physical design of the bridge to accommodate just Gretsch bridge configurations (several hole shapes and diameters, at least five different hole spacings; three bottom profiles; and several compensation patterns)...it just gets too daunting. Each would require a separate cast (with the development costs for moulds) - and which combination of specs would I start with?

So...the only way Tru-Arcs made of Proteus will happen is if the shop is so fascinated and curious that they conceive an independent passion to experiment. That's mighty unlikely.


As a purely personal aside, it's curious to me that my three brothers all have engineering and fabrication expertise in various materials. One specializes in metal, one in ceramic applications, the other largely in woodworking as a high-end high school "industrial arts" teacher (whatever they call that now).

But not me. When given the square-peg-in-round-hole test in junior high, to determine who had the aptitude for "shop" class, mine came back with a notation something like don't let this kid NEAR a tool. So, given my relative strengths in academics (other than math!), it was obvious I was bound for the liberal arts - despite a serious lifelong interest in science and technology.

So I'm free to flit about having ideas, mostly unencumbered by the constraints of reality. Sometimes others see fit to bring the practical ideas I occasionally generate to life - but not often!

One of my great ongoing frustrations in life is the vast gulf between the conception of a fabulous idea - and the various physical and procedural constraints one encounters, the tedious drudgery one must endure, and the many unanticipated hurdles one has to clear to actually realize (or really actualize) that conception.

In other words, in my mind this is already done, and it's perfect; what the hell is wrong with reality?


Also, the party in the other thread is just my speed - not much happening other than an ongoing demonstration of strict social distancing.

– Proteus

Tim!

You are one of my favorite human beings on this planet - and I don't like people much...

Thanks again for the stories, explanations and the golden touch you have on everything you write.

Cheers!

6

Hey, if it makes my guitar playing better, sign me up for one.


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