Miscellaneous Rumbles

Tired

1

I have thought long and heard about this whether to put this on here. It’s saddening officers have lost their lives in the US. When the reality is the vast vast majority are good decent people. Is it a tragedy GF died absolutely but the world shouldn’t burn for it. If this post offends thine eye then pluck it out and bounce me from this site.

I have been a police Officer for 23 years. The vast majority of that time working in uniform in some form of frontline policing. None of the below is unique to me. All officers have there own stories and memories.

Number of people I have killed = zero

Number of lives saved (directly) = One I have the Royal Humane Society Award to prove it. A drunk homeless woman that had stopped breathing. I did CPR until better help took over.

Number of lives saved (indirectly) = impossible to count every time I arrested someone for violence, drugs, domestic violence etc. Stopped someone bleeding to death before better help got there. Found the suicidal missing person before they killed themselves (a few of them.) sectioned people who were so mentally unwell as they were a risk to themselves (a lot)

Number of people I have watched die = one. A road traffic accident I watched him take his last breath, I then tried to save him. This is indelibly etched in my memory. Every now and then I comes to the surface.

Number of burning houses entered = one. A genuinely scary place. How fire fighters go into a smoke filled house and don’t want to run out screaming I will never know. If there are firefighters reading this - you are a steely eyed rocket man. Kudos to them.

Number of suicides attended = six. All of them by hanging. Sometimes it’s a struggle now dealing with a hanging.

Death messages delivered = one. I’ve been lucky with this to go through 23 yrs and only had to deliver one of these. It was a 15 yr old girl that had died - when the mother was told I didn’t think it was possible for a person to make the noise she did. Another memory etched on my brain.

Number of times I’ve been assaulted = too many to count.

Number of times I’ve hit someone with a baton = One. He had wrapped a belt around his fist (that was a clue it wasn’t going well.) hit him twice on the leg. When he dropped to the floor I didn’t need to hit him anymore, that’s when was handcuffed. He was later convicted.

Number of times fought with people who don’t want to arrested = Too many to count.

However people who don’t know me are prepared to say I’m a racist serial killer, and are prepared to do me serious harm because of how I choose to earn my living. Understand this you may need me to save your life at some point and risk my own in the process. So you can disparage and curse as much as like but when you pick up the phone and dial 999 a police Officer will go to you when you absolutely need them the most.

2

If every profession was condemned for the actions of a few there would be no trusted doctors, lawyers, teachers, engineers, journalists,...

3

If every profession was condemned for the actions of a few there would be no trusted doctors, lawyers, teachers, engineers, journalists,...

– NJBob

But with us it’s easy, what is seen is a uniform. It’s easy to dehumanise a police Officer and to justify assault or murder.

I make no apologies for what I do for a living. I act honourably, with integrity,

4

It's a thankless job for so many good people due to the horrible acts of the bad.

That being said, thank you for all the good you do and have done.

5

The other side of the coin .... I believe the vast majority of us appreciate what you do, the risks you take for the greater good, the sacrifices you make, the commitment, the tireless efforts to keep our society from coming unglued.

And we who see and value what you do, we hope and trust that we are not all painted with the same brush by you and your brothers and sisters in blue.

Know that your contribution is absolutely essential, and very much appreciated. Thank you for your service.

6

The other side of the coin .... I believe the vast majority of us appreciate what you do, the risks you take for the greater good, the sacrifices you make, the commitment, the tireless efforts to keep our society from coming unglued.

And we who see and value what you do, we hope and trust that we are not all painted with the same brush by you and your brothers and sisters in blue.

Know that your contribution is absolutely essential, and very much appreciated. Thank you for your service.

– Jazzhands11

I appreciate the sentiment. As I’m British I find the ‘Thank you for your service’ a little embarrassing (that’s the stiff upper lip for you and the great British reserve.

I’m sorry I just need to vent.

7

Police have to deal with the worst society has to offer on a daily basis. I feel the vast majority of them are honorable people, willing to serve the public. I appreciate what they do.

On the other hand, there are some bad apples, as we've witnessed lately. A farmer will cull the bad apples before they ruin the rest of the barrel. Sadly, when some officer of the law feels that he is above that law, he can contaminate the whole group. We need a better culling process. There seems to be a drastic difference between departments from one city to another. When a cop has multiple complaints for overt violence, it needs to be addressed. We praise them when they do good; we need to deal with them when they don't.

8

It's a Thin Blue Line sometimes more than others...hopefully we all learn something.

Nothing wrong or otherwise having a career as a Peace Officer.

Our nephew is a medium-sized city cop in Connecticut paying his dues, gaining experience and awareness out in the field. He went to school with the kid that shot up everybody at Sandy Hook.

His mother taught at the same school.

I think that had something to do with it...Sheep Dog attitude.

Several of my neighbors are retired Law Enforcement lifers, with real life stories that make you wonder...

9

One of the toughest gigs there is....You can't help but have feelings about the damage you see done-- and that's why there are acts of unparalleled compassion and heroism, as well as acts of breathtaking cruelty. Robocop exists only in fiction; the rest of them are 100% human.

10

Like a lot of things, the negative gets the attention. I believe that most people believe that most police officers are admirable people performing a service that most others don’t want to do. It must be tremendously stressful. Thank you for your service.

11

I appreciate the sentiment. As I’m British I find the ‘Thank you for your service’ a little embarrassing (that’s the stiff upper lip for you and the great British reserve.

I’m sorry I just need to vent.

– Sorefingers

Apologies. I meant no disrespect.

12

I'm glad you're out there. Take care and stay sane.

13

Thank you for your efforts. I really mean that. Being an officer of the law cannot be an easy job, and its often a thankless job.

That being said, I am not going to dismiss the "few bad apples" argument. If a kid is rude to a customer in retail, they're fired. If a bartender serves a minor alcohol, they're fired and can serve up to a year in prison in some states. If an officer KILLS someone, they get paid leave. If an officer has 76(!) complaints against them they're still on the force?!

I see a comment that the departments vary across the country.... but the actual proof, the video evidence, seems to paint a picture that these departments are depressingly more similar than different, at least in the largest cities.

How many of you have watched all 300+ videos capturing excessive force used the past 2 weeks? There's a twitter and facebook page dedicated to storing them all. They're very hard to watch, I'm in a depression from watching them, but someone needs to watch them. Someone needs to know how insane with power in makes these police look.

There is a video where a solitary man standing in the street is shot in the face with a gas canister from maybe 10 ft away. Is that ok? Even if he was defying their orders to walk away or whatever?

There is a video of a man walking home from work just minutes prior to the curfew and he was arrested, just for walking home. Is that ok? Sure he was released a few hours later but he was visibly shaking on camera fearing for his life because god knows what these officers would do to him. Is that mental stress ok?

There is video where two officers shoved a 75yo man to the ground that was trying to return a found police helmet to the police. They were put on leave and now 57 officers in the same group have resigned in protest. That sounds like cult-like behavior to me. Imagine quitting your job to defend the right(?) to shove old men to the ground and almost kill them. Is this ok?

This is not ok.

My heart used to well up when a baseball park had a "Honor Service members" day. I used to cheer on the heroic acts the news selectively picked to report.

No more. It has become painfully obvious in only a matter of days that we have serious systemic issues regarding police forces in this country and if you take the time to look at the THREE HUNDRED videos covering only 12 days of excessive force, your mind might be changed as well.

Absolutely there are good officers. My city's cheif of police seems to be one of the good ones thankfully. They stopped antagonizing and escalating on the peaceful protests after only a few days and we have had nothing but peaceful demonstrations now. But some of these other cities seem to have some real psychopaths in them where they can't seem to stop brutalizing people.

Yeah a water bottle hurts when it's tossed at you, ask many rock musicians that have been hit by one. When you're wearing full riot protective gear, do you REALLY need to shoot out a journalists eyeball with a rubber bullet over it? The mere gumption it must take to turn a weapon on someone (leathal or not) for throwing a water bottle is beyond me. Maybe I would have to have been on the force to understand it, but I'm just a citizen, and I want to live in a world where police arent nearly killing an entire family over a possible shoplifting case (Phoenix AZ, 06/2019).

14

Police have to deal with the worst society has to offer on a daily basis. I feel the vast majority of them are honorable people, willing to serve the public. I appreciate what they do.

On the other hand, there are some bad apples, as we've witnessed lately. A farmer will cull the bad apples before they ruin the rest of the barrel. Sadly, when some officer of the law feels that he is above that law, he can contaminate the whole group. We need a better culling process. There seems to be a drastic difference between departments from one city to another. When a cop has multiple complaints for overt violence, it needs to be addressed. We praise them when they do good; we need to deal with them when they don't.

– wabash slim

Don’t disagree. I have used force, it’s impossible to not use force. I have had complaints for excess force. Again impossible to not get complaints. Malicious complaints not unheard of.

a fair independent process for investigating complaints an absolute necessity. Provides confidence on all sides.

15

My brother-in-law is Paul Kramer, the Beverly Hills Motorcycle cop that Zsa Zsa slapped back in ‘89. Lots of stories about the upper crust of society fighting, slapping and resisting arrest. It ain’t just the dregs.

It’s an impossible job. You have my respect and thanks.

16

My brother-in-law is Paul Kramer, the Beverly Hills Motorcycle cop that Zsa Zsa slapped back in ‘89. Lots of stories about the upper crust of society fighting, slapping and resisting arrest. It ain’t just the dregs.

It’s an impossible job. You have my respect and thanks.

– Powdog

That's not only the "upper crust"---that's just the self entitled.

"Do you know who I am? Do you know how important I am?"

17

"How many of you have watched all 300+ videos capturing excessive force used the past 2 weeks? There's a twitter and facebook page dedicated to storing them all. They're very hard to watch, I'm in a depression from watching them, but someone needs to watch them. Someone needs to know how insane with power in makes these police look."

If it bothers you, and it should, don't watch them. The Media is already doing enough to kick up the sand.

There are probably the same amount of videos out there of Police doing the right thing.

I hope this thread doesn't go south. The best thing I've heard stated so far....

Not all Blacks are criminals, Not all Whites are Racist and not all cops are bad.

Much respect to you sir for your efforts and dedication. We would all do good to walk in another mans shoes for a day.

18

I’ve watched those 300 videos. Every one of them (so far). And I have a lot of friends out there protesting and a few family friends that are cops.

This whole thing has been a big topic of discussion lately. My honest take, after talking with everyone every day about it, boils down to this.

(Note that this is US specific, I can’t say anything for anywhere else)

This isn’t about George Floyd. That was just the latest straw. Not to dismiss that incident, but charging those 4 cops doesn’t fix the bigger issue.

There’s a large group of people in this country that get much worse treatment from the police and the justice system as a whole. It’s not a codified racism, there’s no law that says one race is treated better or worse than another. But ask a group of white people in the US if they’d like to be treated how minorities are treated around here. None of them will volunteer. A few will speak up about how they don’t think there’s a real issue.

But the numbers don’t lie. And hundreds of videos don’t lie.

So... protests. Again.

But this time around the timing lines up with a lot of people being out of work with nothing else to do and not much to lose.

And so now the protests are much much bigger than ever before. And people aren’t stopping. They come out day after day.

They’re not asking for specific cops to be charged. That’s beside the point. They’re asking for systemic change. Specifically they’re asking that the police be held accountable for their actions. External reviews of complaints. More training. That cops who get fired for brutality to not get rehired in the town next door. On a personal note, these demands seem reasonable.

And now we get to the even trickier part.

Some rioters and looters are using the protests as an excuse to riot and loot.

And some police are using the rioters and looters as an excuse to bully protestors and assert physical authority over civilians.

Of course it isn’t all cops. But if you won’t judge all cops by the handful of bad ones then you can’t judge the protestors by the actions of the rioters.

I’ve seen videos of rioters cleaning out small businesses and setting buildings on fire.

And I’ve seen videos of police herding peaceful protestors into alleys without exits and opening fire on them. Setting curfews in NYC, then blocking subway entrances so people can’t get home. Drive-by shooting bystanders in LA. And much, much worse.

These videos aren’t all on TV yet. They’re easy enough to find though. Both sides are rioting. But only one side has weapons.

So what’s the fix? Something has to give, right?

Normally (if that’s a thing) the president would make a speech trying to unify the country. Local politicians would try to deescalate the situation at home. Police chiefs would attempt to charge specific officers for their bad actions and urge people to stay home. Public leaders would use this pandemic as an excuse people could hide behind to stop all this.

Some of that’s happening. But for the most part the federal level leadership has taken sides. And so the protests aren’t stopping because nothing’s on track to get better.

If the bad apple cops back off they’ll eventually get fired and loose their pensions.

If the protesters back off the bad apple cops will treat them even worse for the rest of their lives.

Not everyone out their on the streets is out for blood. But it only takes a few.

On the plus side there’s been a huge uptick in voter registration.

19

My city's cheif of police seems to be one of the good ones thankfully. They stopped antagonizing and escalating on the peaceful protests after only a few days and we have had nothing but peaceful demonstrations now. - Muinarc

Same here. My day job involves a fair amount of scrutinizing, and sometimes antagonizing the police, but I have nothing but respect for the Madison PD. They've handled this situation about as well as you could hope for.

There is video where two officers shoved a 75yo man to the ground that was trying to return a found police helmet to the police. They were put on leave and now 57 officers in the same group have resigned in protest. That sounds like cult-like behavior to me. - Muinarc

It's almost more disturbing than the incident itself. But they didn't quit their jobs, just the emergency response team. In other words, when their services are needed most, the "principled" stand they take demonstrates that their true allegiance is not to the community, but to the brotherhood.

20

That's not only the "upper crust"---that's just the self entitled.

"Do you know who I am? Do you know how important I am?"

– wabash slim

When stopped or otherwise detained by a law enforcement officer, there are two critical things one must do to ensure a positive outcome. One, be sure to remind the officer that you pay his or her salary. This will engender a sense of gratitude in the officer, creating a disposition towards leniency. Two, make sure the officer knows that your income is two to ten times greater than his or hers (whether true or not). Doing so will inspire fear and awe in the officer, thereby discouraging him or her from incurring your wrath and suffering the attendant consequences.

In the infinitesimally unlikely event that following these steps does not lead to the auspicious conclusion to which you are entitled, success will be assured with one final measure. Threaten to sue the officer, and leave no room for doubt that you will have his or her badge.

21

I sincerely hope that last post was a joke.

22

I cant think of a worse career than being a cop. Most everyone you pull over either lies to you or has an attitude. And imagine pulling someone over at 3am, its totally dark and you don’t know if the driver has a gun or whatnot.

Everytime I see a cop in a coffee shop I always stop and thank them for their service and let them know how much I appreciate their work.

And I live in a city (Dallas) where our cops have a mostly good reputation, you don’t see the horrors here that I’m seeing in other major cities these days.

I’m also horrified by the bad apples out there, so my daughter and I marched in the protest in Dallas the other day. And I stopped most every cop I saw and told them how much I appreciate their efforts.

DPD is not perfect but I feel lucky to live in my city and I back my blue.

I hope this thread stays positive

23

@ Deke - you're a brit, you should recognize irony when you see it

24

When stopped or otherwise detained by a law enforcement officer, there are two critical things one must do to ensure a positive outcome. One, be sure to remind the officer that you pay his or her salary. This will engender a sense of gratitude in the officer, creating a disposition towards leniency. Two, make sure the officer knows that your income is two to ten times greater than his or hers (whether true or not). Doing so will inspire fear and awe in the officer, thereby discouraging him or her from incurring your wrath and suffering the attendant consequences.

In the infinitesimally unlikely event that following these steps does not lead to the auspicious conclusion to which you are entitled, success will be assured with one final measure. Threaten to sue the officer, and leave no room for doubt that you will have his or her badge.

– Afire

Don't forget to yell, "You can't arrest me!"

A kick or a punch will add emphasis to your indignation.

25

Most police officers I’m sure are good and honest folks who went into law enforcement to help people. They deal with people at their worst and it’s a dangerous job. Like all professions there are good ones and bad ones and I know it’s considered very bad form to criticize a fellow member of the group. @sorefingers is what Officer Chauvin did to George Floyd, acceptable police behavior? Should he be prosecuted for what happened?


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