Miscellaneous Rumbles

The Proper Way to Relic Your Denim Jeans

3

Stand them up against the wall at night!

4

Ewww. I ain't wear no stanky jeans, yo!

5

Once they get a hole in them, they're relegated to work or painting pants. Still, wash them nasty things! Between parochial school and the military, I just can't be that slovenly.

6

Oh, the skinny jean hipster crowd is going to love this...

8

Dirty Hippies!

– Billy Zoom

...must use back door!

10

Yuk! There have been studies identifying the amount of fecal matter that ends up in pants after a day or so. Six months?

11

Is this another test to see how dumb and gullible people are?

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That's funny you started this thread because I planned on starting a thread asking which brand jeans do GDP members like which is a different but related topic.

13

Once they get a hole in them, they're relegated to work or painting pants. Still, wash them nasty things! Between parochial school and the military, I just can't be that slovenly.

– wabash slim

LOL back in the 80s holes in the jeans is what people not only hoped for but also paid for.

14

The article states "washing new jeans will damage the fabric". Could this just be a ploy to cover up the lower quality of denim Levi's is using these days? I stopped buying Levi's for the exact reason their CEO stated. I wore Levi's all my life, until about ten years ago. They never wore out in the wash before, but they do now.

15

Yeah, I saw that! I was going to comment, "I don't know but I sure ain't going to wash 'em."

16

The article states "washing new jeans will damage the fabric". Could this just be a ploy to cover up the lower quality of denim Levi's is using these days? I stopped buying Levi's for the exact reason their CEO stated. I wore Levi's all my life, until about ten years ago. They never wore out in the wash before, but they do now.

– Wade H

Wade, I think so too. I agree it is Levi's way of saying hey it's your fault for damaging them because you washed them but in fact it's low quality fabric is the cause.

telling you washing your jeans might damage them is like saying driving your car may cause damage to you tires.

17

In the 80s, well maybe the mid 80s and into maybe the early '90s acid wash where big. First time I saw it was in 1986 in Singapore. Saw these British kids wearing them and thought they looked so cool. I could hardly wait to make some myself when I got back home from traveling. No internet then so I couldn't look that up how to do it but some how I recall hearing just tie them up and add lots of Clorox to the wash wish the jeans only in the wash cycle. They turned out great. About that time or a year later you could buy them in the shops done already. The ones pre-made didn't look as good as mine i made. Maybe the store ones were too over done. I think maybe the acid wash jeans were already in the punk culture of the early 80s or late 70s but they went mainstream about 1986.

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LOL back in the 80s holes in the jeans is what people not only hoped for but also paid for.

– ThePolecats

I understand that. Then, they started splashing bleach on jeans; now, they take razor blades to them. Kind of ruins the thought of being hard wearing work clothes. I remember when we felt sorry for kids with ripped and ruined jeans---and who were too thick to wear their caps right. Life goes on.

19

When I was a kid, new jeans were unwearable --- too stiff to tolerate. There was a "breaking in" ritual, where you'd soak them in hot water, then wring and twist and pull for a good long while, then crumple them up and pound on 'em with a baseball bat until your arms got tired, THEN wash and dry them normally.

After that, they were comfy enough to wear.

20

When I was a kid, new jeans were unwearable --- too stiff to tolerate. There was a "breaking in" ritual, where you'd soak them in hot water, then wring and twist and pull for a good long while, then crumple them up and pound on 'em with a baseball bat until your arms got tired, THEN wash and dry them normally.

After that, they were comfy enough to wear.

– Parabar

The article is referring to rigid stiff unwashed denim. People these days like to wear it in from fresh...no washing...to get some good “honeycombing” creases and other wear and tear before they eventually wash them. The longer you don’t wash them the greater the definition between the dark denim and the light creases.

21

When I was a kid, new jeans were unwearable --- too stiff to tolerate. There was a "breaking in" ritual, where you'd soak them in hot water, then wring and twist and pull for a good long while, then crumple them up and pound on 'em with a baseball bat until your arms got tired, THEN wash and dry them normally.

After that, they were comfy enough to wear.

– Parabar

That's funny because we did the same thing. I think jeans these days are softer but back then they were stiff and we did the same ritual so to speak.

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I understand that. Then, they started splashing bleach on jeans; now, they take razor blades to them. Kind of ruins the thought of being hard wearing work clothes. I remember when we felt sorry for kids with ripped and ruined jeans---and who were too thick to wear their caps right. Life goes on.

– wabash slim

LOL. Exactly, back in the 70s as a kid I would hate wearing holes thru the jeans knees. As a kid it was so easy to destroy jeans. I know exactly what you mean. My mom would patch them with iron on patches but mine wasn't a heart.

23

Feeling old here! Back in the 1950s in Alaska we only got new jeans at Christmas, during the year when we got holes they were patched up, many of us had patches ON patches! Darn few toys back then, we received our clothes and fresh(?) fruit at various holidays. Must be a song there somewhere? You guys and gals that have that talent!

24

I've heard this about jeans for years. Lot's of denim on the GDP lately.


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