Miscellaneous Rumbles

The Mighty Quokka

1

It occurred to me recently that some of you fellas might not know what a quokka is. Last year I built myself a Rat pedal and became interested in how I could make one with less gain and with a bass and treble control and once I was happy with it I called it the Quokka. I live in Perth, Western Australia, and just off the coast here is a small island called Rottnest. You can see it from the beaches here and it's a popular holiday spot, although I find it boring and over-priced. But it's an institution here.

Rottnest was named by early Dutch spice merchants who would bump into it in their sailing ships. Rottnest means rats nest (although to school-leaving Perth kids it means getting pissed and creating havoc). The "rats" in question are quokkas, and Rottnest is the only place quokkas now live. They are a bit like mini-kangaroos. It has become fashionable to take selfies with a quokka because they look like they are having a good time. I hope the quokkas survive their brush with fame.

2

!!!

That's cool.

I just looked them up--my daughter now wants to adopt about 10.

K

3

I've always been fascinated by the unique Wildlife in and around Australia. I live in the US state of Arizona, we we have our own unique fauna, but it is nothing like the the strange (from our perspective) and interesting species that you enjoy. I think the one that intrigues me most is the Duckbill Platypus. It's a creature that looks to be stitched together using various parts of other animals, an all together fascinating example of an evolutionary niche. This Quokka is one that flew under my radar, until just now. What an interesting looking specimen of marsupial. Thanks, Jimmy, for bringing this lovely little critter to our attention. It gave me a smile!

4

I was taken by a friend to visit his mum in the hills of Perth a few years ago. We have coastal plain where the city is, hills, then desert for about 3000km. While we were in my friend's mum's house she was visited by some potoroos by her back door. Potoroos are smaller than quokkas but maybe slightly bigger than squirrels. Again, they are mini kangaroos and incredibly cute. They came to feed on fruit left out for them.

So we do have some cute wildlife which doesn't want to kill you. Actually who knows? Maybe they do but simply aren't equipped properly?

One of my favourites in Western Australia is the numbat. I've never seen one in the wild and am unlikely to. But they are incredibly beautiful - kinda like a possum but with tiger stripes on their hindquarters. They eat termites and live in the deep forest of south-western Australia. We have possums in the suburbs and they like to invade ceilings, make a ton of very scary noise and pee everywhere creating excruciatingly bad smells. They are cute but smell really bad. Like wombats. Wombats stink. But they are fascinating for doing cubic poo. I'm not kidding! They do cubic turds so that they don't roll away from the burrow entrance. They use turds as communication, so need them to stick around.

Wade my wife used to be a librarian at our dept of Main Roads. One of the periodicals she received every month was "Arizona Highways", which may sound dull but had some great photography in it. Arizona looks like it would be a cool place to explore. Did you know that the male platypus is one of the very few venomous mammals? It has venomous spurs behind its rear legs and can give you a nasty sting. It's a monotreme, which is a small group of egg-laying mammals. There are three monotreme species in the entire world - the platypus and two types of echidna. A friend of mine who lives in a very outer suburb of Perth sometimes sees echidnas on her driveway. I'm so jealous!

5

They use turds as communication

I know there must be a illuminating comparison to some aspect of human behavior here, but I can’t think of it.

6

Don’t forget the tammar on Garden Island. And their mates, the tiger snakes.

It was amazing working there and seeing the tammar, though you had to be very aware while driving at night.

7

What the hell is it with Australia and it's neighbors?

Either everything wants to kill you or it's mind numbingly adorable!

8

The Aussies had a war against the emus---and lost.

9

They use turds as communication

I know there must be a illuminating comparison to some aspect of human behavior here, but I can’t think of it.

– Proteus

Twitter?

10

Yeah, I was thinking of Twitter, or Farcebook, or politics.

Might have to go a little deeper into Wombat physiology to observe that some mammals' sphincters seem more articulate than some humans' mouths.


Clarification: it's actually not the sphincter but the last portion of the intestine where the raw material is molded to shape. But how much does it hurt the comparison to say some mammals' lower intestines are more articulate than some humans' mouths?

Not quite as punchy. In either case, I don't think this one is pithy (or obvious) enough for a T-shirt. Yet. We can keep working on it...

Wombats poop square - why can't [politician name here] talk straight?

11

Yeah, I was thinking of Twitter, or Farcebook, or politics.

Might have to go a little deeper into Wombat physiology to observe that some mammals' sphincters seem more articulate than some humans' mouths.


Clarification: it's actually not the sphincter but the last portion of the intestine where the raw material is molded to shape. But how much does it hurt the comparison to say some mammals' lower intestines are more articulate than some humans' mouths?

Not quite as punchy. In either case, I don't think this one is pithy (or obvious) enough for a T-shirt. Yet. We can keep working on it...

Wombats poop square - why can't [politician name here] talk straight?

– Proteus

Wombats turds are cubical, not square.

Do politicians' sphincters get jealous of the poop that comes out of their mouths?

Turds are pointed at the ends so sphincters don't slam shut.

12

Wombats turds are cubical, not square.

Only if they're 3-dimensional wombats.

13

Quokkas are always happy to see you:


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