Miscellaneous Rumbles

The “good” side of OCD.

1

200,000 miles and she still purrs.

2

Well done. It pays to take care of your stuff.

3

Never heard of a Ford OCD. Or is it GM?

4

I get it. My 1986 Ford F150 gave me over 350,000 miles before the rust took over. My 1966 Buick had 250,000 miles when I sold it. I have a maintenance schedule for everything. Every Halloween I drain my hot water heater and flush any sediment out of it.

5

I feel fortunate that the stuff I obsess on generally benefits, somehow. Whether it's cleaning or organizing.

One of my more satisfying OCD activities is curating the content in my iTunes library. [I just realized upon typing that how boring it sounds. Nevertheless, ..]

Aside from all of the specific musicians and bands I enjoy, I have a fascination and listening appetite for compilations, which often involve various artists and obscurities. It composes a significant portion of my music files, many of them being multi-disc sets or several in a series.

In many instances some of the info about the song/performer is incomplete, especially the dates. Most compilations (if anything) just plug in the date of the comps' release as a default.

So I'll spend hours online tracking down 'years of release', updating each track to be correct.

It does come in handy when listening 'by year' (which can be fun), but I simply like having the correct track information for my own peace of mind.

7

It must be a perpetual P.I.T.A. for OCD sufferers to have a condition with ‘disorder’ in its name.

8

293,000 miles......

9

But it's a VW! Of course it's done 293 000 miles! Seriously, cars and bikes with boxer engines seem to last and last. You should see some of the mileage that BMW airheads can get to.

BTW what is that black cover over the front of the car for? I've only ever seen those in the USA and been confused. You never see them here.

10

That’s a car bra, it protects against stone chips.

11

Or, if you’re Aussie and listen to Kate Bush, kangas.

12

My son called and said "hay Dad, look what a friend just gave me", I said "quick Son, give it back!" He didn't!

13

Wow, Beautiful old Routemaster! If you don’t want it you can pass it this way...

14

Wow, Beautiful old Routemaster! If you don’t want it you can pass it this way...

– Deke Martin

Seattle to Portland Oregon, on I-5 35 miles an hour top speed! He uses it for festivals, Rose City Vaudeville and such. Done a LOT of work on it, parts can be a problem.

15

I get it. My 1986 Ford F150 gave me over 350,000 miles before the rust took over. My 1966 Buick had 250,000 miles when I sold it. I have a maintenance schedule for everything. Every Halloween I drain my hot water heater and flush any sediment out of it.

– UncleGrumpy

My beloved Subie (Forester, 2000) only managed 150,000 miles before it succumbed to rust. The body was okay, but what lay beneath was in bad shape. I bought it from a neighbor for a quick fix when my previous car was totaled when a teenager blew through a red light and t-boned me. But I quickly fell in love with it and ended up spending twice what I paid for it in maintenance. I live in an old neighborhood and nobody keeps their cars in their tiny garages, so rust tends to be an issue. The last catastrophic failure was the passenger side control arm disintegrated. Bad enough, but considerably more damage was done by the tow truck driver dragging it onto a flatbed. In retrospect, I should have made him stop and get a conventional tow truck, but at that point I knew it was over. I had made arrangements for it to be scrapped, but a mechanic at the shop I had her towed to called and wanted to buy it. Fortunately, he recognized that half the car had already been replaced in the last few years and it was not scrap-worthy. I figured he was going to get it roadworthy and flip it (and not address the manifold simmering issues). Much to my delight, he kept it as his daily driver and by now has no doubt had to fix all the things that were ailing it. I see it every day and it never fails to bring a smile.

16

My beloved Subie (Forester, 2000) only managed 150,000 miles before it succumbed to rust. The body was okay, but what lay beneath was in bad shape. I bought it from a neighbor for a quick fix when my previous car was totaled when a teenager blew through a red light and t-boned me. But I quickly fell in love with it and ended up spending twice what I paid for it in maintenance. I live in an old neighborhood and nobody keeps their cars in their tiny garages, so rust tends to be an issue. The last catastrophic failure was the passenger side control arm disintegrated. Bad enough, but considerably more damage was done by the tow truck driver dragging it onto a flatbed. In retrospect, I should have made him stop and get a conventional tow truck, but at that point I knew it was over. I had made arrangements for it to be scrapped, but a mechanic at the shop I had her towed to called and wanted to buy it. Fortunately, he recognized that half the car had already been replaced in the last few years and it was not scrap-worthy. I figured he was going to get it roadworthy and flip it (and not address the manifold simmering issues). Much to my delight, he kept it as his daily driver and by now has no doubt had to fix all the things that were ailing it. I see it every day and it never fails to bring a smile.

– Afire

I live in Lafayette, IN where Subarus are built. The plant is on Indiana 38---AKA The Bataan Memorial Hiway. City took the sign down. I had a BRAT---like a snowmobile with heat! Great little car!. I won't have another Subie because the local dealer is a worthless tool.

18

I just sold (traded in) my y2k Ford Explorer Limited Edition earlier this month, with 198,000+ miles on it. I bought it cheap ($2500), in 2011, because it needed two new catalytic converters. I put OEM catalytic converters on it, and they weren't cheap ($800 each). I owned it for the past nine years, and put only routine maintenance parts on it (after the catalytic converters). It was a well built vehicle, and didn't smoke or burn oil. This thing was decked out, with a 5ltr Mustang V8 engine, all leather seats and trim, and every technology available in 2000. It also burned gas like nobody's business, averaging about 14MPG.

I traded it in on a 2019 Toyota Highlander XLS, and got $2500 in trade because it was clean. I definitely got my monies worth out of it.

So..... going from top of the line y2k technology to top of the line 2019 technology was a total head spinner! The Highlander can read road signs, and it uses radar for all types of cool things. I've been reading the owners manual, and I'm still finding out cool stuff that it can do. 20MPG city and 30MPG highway from a 295HP V6 engine and an 8 speed two range automatic transmission with a manual shifting feature. It also has a full towing package with a transmission cooler. I was able to take advantage of the super low dealer used car prices during the Covid-19 restrictions. This vehicle had been on the lot for 69 days, and was priced to move! It's the nicest car /suv I've ever owned, and I got it with only 8100 miles on the clock (literally just getting broken in). This Highlander has a 300,000 mile life expectancy, and since I do very little driving, it just may be the last vehicle that I buy.

19

My 2019 Toyota Highlander

20

My 2011 Ford Escape has 212,000 right now. I'll See Y'all next year in Nashville, likely still in that vehicle.

EDIT : I am not singing praises for this Ford. It had to have a new Transmission at 98,000 mi.

21

212k you say? Funny to think when Rachel and I met you and Carolyn at the ‘11 Round-Up that Ford was still spangly new.

22

She's a social worker and drives the heck out of it.

23

I don’t doubt it for a second. My company car is on a lease so gets replaced every 3 years come what may and they always go back with 60k+ on the clock.

My comment was really just about the speed of time as it seems like only yesterday we met you guys, but it was nearly 1/4 million miles ago.


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