Miscellaneous Rumbles

Stem Cell Therapy

1

I did a search to see if there was a previous topic, but I did not find one.

** Stem Cell Therapy, for whatever ails you...

Has anyone done it, have family members who have, etc.? Reviews, comments?

I'm strongly considering for myself and other loved ones. I "appear" to be aging gracefully, but internally, the body hurts.

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2

Stem cell immunotherapy is used for treatment of certain cancers (particularly blood cancers), but I would be skeptical of anyone offering it as a lifestyle-improvement aid.

FDA warning re: stem cell therapies

3

On a guitar forum.......really??? WTF

4

On a guitar forum.......really??? WTF

– Iceman

Miscellaneous Rumbles - "If you’re off-topic before you even start, then start here."

5

Yes, a medical topic in a guitar forum filed under "Miscellaneous Rumbles."

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6

On a guitar forum.......really??? WTF

– Iceman

You've been told.....or rather informed. Exactly what did you think Miscellaneous Rumbles covers?

7

My limited understanding of it, as it pertains to hearing issues, is that it has tremendous potential to cure deafness. It also holds out promise for organ regeneration. However, it also looks like it has a very long way to go before producing results.

8

This is medicine crossed with science, at the bleeding edge of both. Since stem cells appear to have the ability to morph into - or to give rise to - virtually any specialized cell in the body, the essential promise is that we'll be able to grow a new body inside the old one. (At least one subsystem at a time.) Certainly the possible eventual benefits are many.

But if it sounds a little like manipulating cancerous (ie, self-propagating) master cells with payloads to do what we want them to...that's because it is. Certainly the researchers working in the field intend to tell those cells exactly what they want them to do. And programmers intend software code to do what they think they're telling it to do.

Eventually, it does.

Being human, researchers are some combination of compassionate, brilliant, ambitious, determined, visionary, careful, competitive, scrupulous, and obsessed. Being human, they're a mix of altruism and self-interest, inspired by the noblest of ideals and compromised by human frailty. They will make mistakes on the way to success in any application of this technology. Patients who may or may not have intended to be experimental subjects will live (and die) with the mistakes.

It's the price of progress.

And in both medicine and science, the ghastly rule is absolute: if it can be done, it will be done. And there will be a lot of doing, in one place or another, with or without approval and oversight, before we as a species figure this stuff out. Lots of interesting experimental medicine in other countries, and lower cost isn't the only reason medical tourism is a thing.

indianation, you give no details as to what specific problems you experience, or what therapies or procedures you've looked into. I have no expertise in the field, and nothing more than a layman's knowledge or understanding - but my general takeaway is that there are a few proven effective and safe stem cell therapies, and that a much larger range of possible applications is not ready for prime time.

One's willingness to experiment with one's own body varies with one's condition and the calculus of hope and desperation that goes along with it. Those are questions only you can answer. I can certainly imagine a situation in which my physical and emotional misery were so great, and prospect of improvement so small, that I would consider any experiment (that I could afford) worth undergoing - with the clear understanding that even if it failed or hastened my departure, it would be worth it if only for my contribution to the science.

Nother words, we will our dead bodies to science; I can imagine situations in which I would will my barely living body to the eventual greater good.

But just to escape the so-called aches and pains of aging, or for a vague and unproven prospect of longevity? I suppose it depends on the severity of the possible downside (and whether I trusted a practitioner pitching the therapy) but probably not yet.

I'm a believer in science, but I'm in nowhere near bad enough condition that I'm ready to volunteer as a test subject.

9

One of my hips was hurting all the time, from worn out cartilage. I was in agony for a couple of years. I underwent two stem cell injections into the hip, and it completely fixed the problem. I was very skeptical about it, at first, but the proof is in the pudding, I'm totally pain free (in that hip), and have been for two years.

I don't consider myself a part of any experiment, more than I would for any medical procedure. Nothing in life is absolute, or absolutely safe. Everything is a cost/benefit analysis, you buy the ticket - you take the ride.

10

Willing your dead body to science is a good idea. I was at a Walter Trout concert this past summer where he promoted this idea. As a liver transplant recipient, he actively promotes organ and body donations at all of his shows. He says something to the effect of “After all, what are you going to do with it once you’re gone? Help others by donating.” It’s a good argument imo as is participating in some experiments while still alive whether that participation be based on courage, altruism or desperation.

11

Looking at me, I appear to have the outward appearance of a man with a body at 30, but inside, my bones, joints, etc., feel like they are 80.

I had an appointment for a torn hip flexor and found out I have bone on bone, and the pain can be excruciating. My lower back is doing me no favors either, however, I refuse to accept becoming an old man. I need to be active, getting chubby to fat is not acceptable, and giving up hard workouts is unacceptable as well. I don't overdo it, but just getting up in the morning has become so hard compared to 1 year ago.

My mom has dementia and bad hips and neck. My dad, bad back and macular degeneration in both eyes. Watching him lose his eyesight is so painful.

I know my parents are very old, and aging is a part of life, but if can ease their pain while they are here, I'm willing to consider anything.

For myself, to have a thirty-nine-year-old doctor tell me (54) to consider steroid injections or hip replacement surgery is not going to happen. When he said it, I suddenly saw myself walking with a cane!

A high school buddy is doing stem cell, but he just started.

I'm just asking if anyone has tried it, or know others who have, and I'm wondering what the results were.

Thanks for responding...

Addendum: My guess is many people in this forum could use the info obtained as well.

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12

WadeH, do you have any description of what exactly you underwent? Curious about how they obtained your stem cells, and how they made them differentiate to cartilage or other useful tissue...

13

I am very interested in the science and promise of Stem Cell research and potential therapy. When my daughter was born around Y2K, I paid a flat fee to have a person pick up and fly a portion of her umbilical cord blood with hematopoietic stem cells in it to a private "bank" to be held for her lifetime, as "biological insurance" for her and maybe even other close family members over time. There are no ongoing payments for me, it was a one time payment.

There's already a long list of FDA approved Cord Blood Treatments, with the list growing longer every day. I think its exciting to see it finally become more mainstream.

My advice (if you can swing it), is to find a Doc nearby who can explain the options of treatment with stem cells and begin a dialog. Best of luck !

14

I know a few people who tried it for hands & knees. It didn't work, but it was expensive.

15

WadeH, do you have any description of what exactly you underwent? Curious about how they obtained your stem cells, and how they made them differentiate to cartilage or other useful tissue...

– Thomas

Thomas, this is how I understand it: The stem cells that I received were harvested from the umbilical cord blood, of newborn babies. The mothers donate the cords, which contain blood (in the tied off section) that is rich with stem cells, to local blood banks. The blood bank drains the blood, then donates it to a stem cell research company. This company harvests the stem cells, and prepairs them for the various applications.

I actually received two injections in each hip, since both showed radiographic evidence of cartilage degeneration, the left hip (the problem hip) showed a greater degeneration than the right one. The injections were given, one in each hip, two weeks apart.

The procedure was performed by the Phoenix VA Medical Center's Outpatient Interventional Radiology Department. The whole thing took about 30 minutes, and was completely painless, except for the lidocaine injections, they sting a bit.

I was made to disrobe, and don a hospital gown. The procedure was performed under needle guided fluoroscopy, on an x-ray table. They injected both hips from the front, and I was immediately able to get up, dress myself, and drive home. This is because no sedation was either given or needed. I repeated the whole thing two weeks later. The whole thing was about as easy and pain free as you could ever imagine. I was actually amazed at how easy it was, it sounded kind of freaky and weird, but I was in and out of there lickity split!

It took a couple of months before I began to notice any improvements, but after I did, the improvements continued for about 6 months, during which my pain gradually but completely vanished. I had been in gnawing agony for a long time. It had been my chief complaint, even after all those tremendous back surgeries I went through. That was 2 years ago, and I haven't had any hip pain at all, not even a twinge.

My understanding is that the stem cells filled in the voids in my degenerated cartilage, and grew new cartilage in the voids,and a new cartilage lining in the hip socket. Apparently they only need to be isolated and in contact with a particular tissue type, in order to assume their new differentiated role. Whatever it was, I'll take it!

16

I've not had stem cell therapy; but, as recently as last Thursday, I was considering it, and other currently offered alternatives. I have resigned myself to total knee (left) replacement, on the 25th. I partially chose that due to the expense of stem cell therapy (out of pocket for me), and my lack of success from ultra concentrated plasma rich platelet injections. They also offered the prp with alpha 2 macroglobulin, which has had great to miraculous results. for some. I am still so unsure, and stressed. My extreme osteoporisis causes me the extra concern. Here's hopin.

17

Thomas, this is how I understand it: The stem cells that I received were harvested from the umbilical cord blood, of newborn babies. The mothers donate the cords, which contain blood (in the tied off section) that is rich with stem cells, to local blood banks. The blood bank drains the blood, then donates it to a stem cell research company. This company harvests the stem cells, and prepairs them for the various applications.

I actually received two injections in each hip, since both showed radiographic evidence of cartilage degeneration, the left hip (the problem hip) showed a greater degeneration than the right one. The injections were given, one in each hip, two weeks apart.

The procedure was performed by the Phoenix VA Medical Center's Outpatient Interventional Radiology Department. The whole thing took about 30 minutes, and was completely painless, except for the lidocaine injections, they sting a bit.

I was made to disrobe, and don a hospital gown. The procedure was performed under needle guided fluoroscopy, on an x-ray table. They injected both hips from the front, and I was immediately able to get up, dress myself, and drive home. This is because no sedation was either given or needed. I repeated the whole thing two weeks later. The whole thing was about as easy and pain free as you could ever imagine. I was actually amazed at how easy it was, it sounded kind of freaky and weird, but I was in and out of there lickity split!

It took a couple of months before I began to notice any improvements, but after I did, the improvements continued for about 6 months, during which my pain gradually but completely vanished. I had been in gnawing agony for a long time. It had been my chief complaint, even after all those tremendous back surgeries I went through. That was 2 years ago, and I haven't had any hip pain at all, not even a twinge.

My understanding is that the stem cells filled in the voids in my degenerated cartilage, and grew new cartilage in the voids,and a new cartilage lining in the hip socket. Apparently they only need to be isolated and in contact with a particular tissue type, in order to assume their new differentiated role. Whatever it was, I'll take it!

– Wade H

I just read the other day that some scientist has a way of using nanotech to fuse ferit based nanobots to stem cells and using a magnet to hold the stem cells in place until they take hold. Apparently that's the big hurdle to overcome, often times the injected cells migrate away before they take root. Glad to hear it worked in your case.

18

Stem cell technology means many things. But to say that injecting some "stem cells" will make you younger, repair cartilage, etc....is not quite the truth. However, there are many things that it may help...and there are many risks. The greatest risk is to your wallet. It surely will deplete it...when you could be buying a new vintage Gretsch with it. Let me know what the issue is and I can offer an opinion....I have some experience.

And then we can get back to talking about Gretsch Guitars...because the binding on some of my Gretsch's could use some stem cell therapy.

19

Wade, I’m happy for you that your pain disappeared,

But....

Link

20

I'm doing my research, asking questions and pricing...

Thanks for the responses.

...!

21

Wade, I’m happy for you that your pain disappeared,

But....

Link

– Thomas

Thomas, I followed the link, and read the article. It falls deeply on the side of the naysayers, and I can just as easily find an article at its poler opposite. You will find extreme opinions on both sides of this issue, I believe that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. With radically different techniques and sources available, there are bound to be differing results. Unscrupulous clinics, with pure profit motivation, might cut corners to increase profits.

I was a success story, others have not been as fortunate. All I know, is that I was in agony for a long time, and now I'm not, and haven't been for two years. I think that we can discount the placebo effect at this point, at least in my case. My procedure was performed at a VA Hospital, that is not profit motivated. I paid for my procedure through many years of military service, and that is how I could 'afford' it.

22

My limited understanding of it, as it pertains to hearing issues, is that it has tremendous potential to cure deafness. It also holds out promise for organ regeneration. However, it also looks like it has a very long way to go before producing results.

– Journeyman

It would be really great if they could perfect it for hearing, The only disability that people get mad it you for having (both ears)! Probably far too late to help with my arthritis, I keep stumbling along with bent fingers! NOT giving up strumming whenever I can! Probably driving the wife nuts!

23

Thomas, I followed the link, and read the article. It falls deeply on the side of the naysayers, and I can just as easily find an article at its poler opposite. You will find extreme opinions on both sides of this issue, I believe that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. With radically different techniques and sources available, there are bound to be differing results. Unscrupulous clinics, with pure profit motivation, might cut corners to increase profits.

I was a success story, others have not been as fortunate. All I know, is that I was in agony for a long time, and now I'm not, and haven't been for two years. I think that we can discount the placebo effect at this point, at least in my case. My procedure was performed at a VA Hospital, that is not profit motivated. I paid for my procedure through many years of military service, and that is how I could 'afford' it.

– Wade H

Salute Sir! And thank you for your service!


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