Miscellaneous Rumbles

Songs You Consider Masterpieces

51

"I know that soul and R&B are not everyone's cup o' tea around here, but I'm gonna post this anyway."

No argument here, TP. Jackie Wilson's the man.

Incidentally, it's been an education reading though this thread. As ever, it's each to his/her own of course. But I sometimes think that 'masterpiece' is one of those words like 'genius' and 'awesome' — somewhere along the line the bar has been, shall we say, lowered a little. And the OP did ask which songs, rather than performances, are regarded as masterpieces. IMO, in the the world of rock/pop music, many a silk purse has been made out of a sow's ear — and vice versa.

I'll throw these in — two crackers from Hoagy Carmichael given remarkable performances.

– Dave_K

Spot on, Dave-- and in terms of performance of Hoagy Carmichael's timeless "Georgia On My Mind", I'll match Brother Ray's performance with the Beautiful rendition by Jerry & Chet-- as Jerry might say.... "SON!"

52

And while I'm at it, I'll take it in a different direction... It's currently sort of trendy to slam the Bradley/Atkins "countrypolitan" sound - Tartan Phantom

Who in the world slams that? That, to my ears, is Classic Country production, and Owen Bradley gave such sweet treatments to songs that benefitted from it, that hearing any other version of such instantly makes me long for the ones with the Bradley mark on them.

– crowbone

You'd be surprised at the number of folks who think that the countrypolitan movement destroyed "real country music"... not kidding... it's laughable, really.

53

Another VERY long list here...starting with "Rock Around The Clock", "Rebel Rouser"...... and MANY others cited above.

Two of my personal favorites by The Moody Blues:

"The Voice"

"Your Wildest Dreams"

55

"Moonlight Serenade" by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra. The song that won World War II.

56

"Moonlight Serenade" by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra. The song that won World War II.

– duojet55

+1000.... I used to play Moonlight Serenade in college in jazz band-- as a drummer. certainly not a flashy drum part, you mainly just keep time-- but the tune is such an ear-worm-- it gets in your head and you'll be humming it for days. The hi-brass horn hits (dah-ah-da-daaah-da) complement the underlying flowing sax line to perfection. Absolutely a "masterpiece."

To this day, still one of my favorite songs to slow-dance to.

57
58

Even though I have nominated 3 as masterpieces, I struggle with the definition. Masterpiece to me is saved for a rare few, perfection themselves, can't imagine better or anything I'd change, or even could be changed. The very definition of craft, ne plus ultra. So it'd be hard in my mind to apply it to dozens of songs.

59

"The song that won World War II."

Hey, I thought that was Vera Lynn singing about bluebirds over the while cliffs of Dover!

When I was a kid we had Moonlight Serenade on a shellac 78 — and I definitely preferred it to Vera Lynn! I actually went more for the flipside (in the UK), American Patrol.

60

Even though I have nominated 3 as masterpieces, I struggle with the definition. Masterpiece to me is saved for a rare few, perfection themselves, can't imagine better or anything I'd change, or even could be changed. The very definition of craft, ne plus ultra. So it'd be hard in my mind to apply it to dozens of songs.

– drmilktruck

I feel that many have the capacity to create a masterpiece using the gifts they were given.

The Kingsmen's version of Louie Louie qualifies to me, because it has the power to get anyone, young, old, familiar or strange to it, to get lost in the song. To get transported, if you will, to where the music wants to take you. I find that to be the difference between background music that's forgettable, and timeless classics.

61

It's too hard...There is too much talent and too many songs to decide.

Brain succombs to the novelty that we might all be able to even vote!

62

"Moonlight Serenade" by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra. The song that won World War II.

– duojet55

and launched the baby boom era...

63

Even though I have nominated 3 as masterpieces, I struggle with the definition. Masterpiece to me is saved for a rare few, perfection themselves, can't imagine better or anything I'd change, or even could be changed. The very definition of craft, ne plus ultra. So it'd be hard in my mind to apply it to dozens of songs.

– drmilktruck

Yes, that is why for my first song when I started the thread I chose "Layla". When I was listening to it in my car the other day (for the 1,000th time in my life) I thought man it can't get better than this song. Still an amazing song to this day.

Then later I struggled because as you say can't imagine better and so forth.

My choice for "Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence" by Rhyuichi Sakamoto is like that. I just get that feeling when I hear that song. The others I chose I get that feeling but those two stand out as an example. I guess all my choices do.

64

Violin Concerto in D Major - Beethoven

Born to Run - The Boss

65

The first song that comes to mind is El Paso by Marty Robbins with Grady Martin:

The version by Raul Malo with John Bohlinger (on a White Falcon) is pretty danged good although someone probably isn't going to like the accordian:

66

Another of my Dead Musician series. But, I learned to love him while he was alive, thankfully. Never did get to see him in concert, which was a goal. This song; this singer; this video; simply magnificent.

– Olivia Anne

YES, agree 100%.

67

To my mind, a "masterpiece" is one that pretty much stands up across many generations, multiple genres, and has a hard-to-define quality which may come down to the simple phrase:

"You don't mess with perfection.."

Sort of a Mona Lisa (the painting, not the Nat King Cole song) kind of thing, only just a little louder.

These pieces evoke an entire era or genre within their opening measures. Few, if any, musicians or serious listeners cannot hum at least a portion of each one.

So without too much thought, here are five which fall into that category for me that often surprise those who have been to my solo gigs of late, or followed my Celtic folk endeavors from the 70's up into the new century.

Miller- Moonlight Serenade Strauss (Jr)- Donau (The Blue Danube Waltz) Gershwin- Rhapsody in Blue (the full version) Eddy- Rebel Rouser Bizet- Carmen -the Overture.

Many have tried -myself included- to come up their "own" versions of these, but no one has quite captured the cachet of the originals.

68

This by Astor Piazzolla.

69

I'm surprised no-one has mentioned "Good Vibrations." Here's my suggestion, a complex song that flows beautifully, great lyrics & a legendary house band.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQU4sIn96M4

71

I'm surprised no-one has mentioned "Good Vibrations." Here's my suggestion, a complex song that flows beautifully, great lyrics & a legendary house band.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQU4sIn96M4

– tonyb

That's because there aren't really any wrong answers here, are there?

Good Vibrations is most definitely a qualifier, but I chose In My Room over that because of the haunting quality of the lyrics blended perfectly with the chords.

72

"Til I Die" is another killer from B.W.

73

Yes - Fragile (Yes, the whole album)

74

Twin Peaks theme song/Falling (Julee Cruise)

Twin Peaks - Love Theme From Twin Peaks


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