Miscellaneous Rumbles

soft rock freakout

26

"To Each His Own...." (1946, actually...)

I really enjoyed music from the "soft rock" era (even thought I found that name an oxymoron). For me it was a really nice change of pace -- a relief??-- from much of the music from the prior era.

27

Got a soft spot for it,but mostly because it's MY past.Otherwise a lot of that era's music,culture,and international events are more than a little cringeworthy. Got pics,so I know it happened,but failing that I wouldn't remember anything!

28

Most of those are artists that defined the music of my youth, and I unabashedly admit to liking most of it. Heck, my musical hero of all time was the second act featured (although that song is eons removed from his best work), followed closely by another favorite group, Hall & Oates.

As for Rupert Holmes, his first two solo LP's were very creative IMHO and he takes a lot of unwarranted c%@p for being a schlock rock guy, but its difficult to argue with success. If all you've ever heard from him was the Piña Colada song, then you've missed some fine music.

29

Ha! I was in the wrong decade.

This is one of my fave's from that era...

30

And I've never really had a problem with either Bread or Ambrosia.

Thing is, if you listen to Bread's actual albums, there quite a bit of heavier material on them. Unfortunately, the other vocalist/songwriter in the band, Jimmy Griffin, got the short end of the stick, and the producers and management went with Gate's softer material as the "face" of the group. In the end, Bread became a make-out music band.

As far as Ambrosia goes, they also got softer as the group progressed, but I've always like David Pack's voice, so there ya go.

My favorite Ambrosia tune? Their first hit...

31

Nice, nice, very nice.

32

I couldn't make it all the way through either, although I find it curious that I tend to either like the selections a lot (Michael McDonald era Doobies, Ambrosia, Hall & Oates, Gerry Rafferty, Player, Rickie Lee Jones) or find it unspeakably heinous (Bread, Rupert Holmes, treacly Chicago ballads, Styx, Phil Collins, America, Air Supply, Eric Carmen). Very little middle ground in the middle-of-the-road!

33

Aren’t you also responsible for Olivia Newton-Tootin?

– Proteus

(There's also that little trio of brothers- originally from England, but living in OZ in the 60's when they began to be heard.. The Brothers Gibb.) "Soft" rockers since most of us still called it "Folk" rock.

(Also Andy Gibb , but he was truly more of an 80s man.)

34

Olivia Newton John was also born in England but grew up in Australia, much as the Young bros were all born in Scotland but grew up here. Mind you, the music the Young bros made was very Australian! I still love the clip of ACDC playing It's a Long Way to the Top on the back of a flatbed truck going down Swanston St Melbourne.

As I have mentioned before my uncle is on radio here (still at 93 years old!) and met the Bee Gees when they were all still teenagers in Brisbane. In fact he helped them get onto the radio in the first place.

35

I still love the clip of ACDC playing It's a Long Way to the Top on the back of a flatbed truck going down Swanston St Melbourne.

You and me both. AC/DC makes up for a lot. (And, I'm sorry, but I liked Little River Band. At least I don't remember anything terrible from them.)


In fact he helped them get onto the radio in the first place.

Aw man, don't feel so bad about it. Everyone's got a black sheep in the family.

36

Also, sorry. Title of the thread.

I keep picturing soft-rockers doing a protracted burn-em-down wreck-of-the-Titans Grand Funk ending by strumming the hell out of acoustic guitars and beating cymbals and snare to a pulp with brushes while smiling unthreateningly.

37

Actually, I've always thought of "Soft" rock as the natural progression of "folk" rock from the 60's.

To me, the line is quite straight in nature. Pure folk led to folk rock, which led to soft rock. Peter Paul and Mary's tale of an imaginary dragon led to the Lovin' Spoonful's problems making up their minds, which led to Dewey Bunnell and a song about a Tin Man.

The punks, or "rebels", as it were, were outgrowths from a somewhat tangental path, but just as easy to trace.

38

My localest music store had a Strat from LRB for sale a few years ago. Can't remember for sure but I think it was an L-series. LRB were from Adelaide, so you would expect them to be boring. Mind you, Glenn Shorrock, the lead singer was from the UK and he seemed like a very decent bloke with a good sense of humour. I suspect that LRB and Air Supply were a lot bigger in the US than they were here.

The big surprise for Adelaide was Cold Chisel who were anything but soft rock. Long one of the Aussie beer-drinkin' ute-drivin' blue-singlet wearin' mullet brigade's favourite bands they had an excellent guitar player in Ian Moss and the irrepressible Scot Jimmy Barnes as singer.

While never a huge fan of 'Chisel I liked them a lot more than LRB I'm afraid!

Olivia Newton John is still big with the women's magazines here. She was big here long before Grease singing kinda country-rock songs like "The Ohio" and was so saccharine that even my mum was turned off. It wasn't until Grease that she started to put a bit more energy into her singing.

39

Also, sorry. Title of the thread.

I keep picturing soft-rockers doing a protracted burn-em-down wreck-of-the-Titans Grand Funk ending by strumming the hell out of acoustic guitars and beating cymbals and snare to a pulp with brushes while smiling unthreateningly.

– Proteus

isn't that just "Closer To Home"?

40

"...Bread became a make-out music band." Tartan Phantom
Served me well for a lot of years.

41

I'll admit to having been tapped to sing "Piña Colada." - Proteus

This shall come to haunt you.

42

That stuff so deeply imbedded itself in my subconscious when it was Top 40 in my youth....

That thanks to my subconscious, I’m condemned to writing what could be called “yacht rock”, which I believe is just a more modern term for soft rock.

But most of the first-guard stuff that grabs me the most are usually deep cuts. Some of it’s timeless to my (albeit somewhat wimpy) sensitivities. Like from Pablo Cruise, Player, 10CC, etc., and of course, T. Rundgren.

But no Eagles or Meetwood Flac, or Billy Joel, thank ya.

Lately, I’ve been on a bit of an Al Stewart kick. “Time sausageeees...” Youtube has a couple of his old concerts. Pretty doggone good band he had.

Howzabout these? ‘Member ‘em?...

43

Also, sorry. Title of the thread.

I keep picturing soft-rockers doing a protracted burn-em-down wreck-of-the-Titans Grand Funk ending by strumming the hell out of acoustic guitars and beating cymbals and snare to a pulp with brushes while smiling unthreateningly.

– Proteus

Tim, didn’t we do a couple gigs like that in the gazebo in the middle of town?


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