Miscellaneous Rumbles

soft rock freakout

1

This was on TV last night-- check it out. I say check out all these 70s-lookin dudes showing off their soft-rock cred. Mustaches abound, and a few cool guitars are seen.

https://funny-video-online....

3

Say what you will about the pigeon-holing of these songs... once you strip away the fluff, there were some monster guitar players shown in that vid.

John Oates, Al Stewart, and Dan Peek (RIP) were/are all excellent musicians and quite proficient guitarists.

And then, of course, Nancy Wilson, Ronnie Wood (with Rod Stewart), Elvin Bishop, Steve Lukather (Toto) and Davey Johnstone (with Elton John).

4

No I was not making fun -- too much -- but there were some good melodies, sophisticated chord changes, etc. Check the Fender 6/12 Christopher Cross was using around 1980. Must have been a custom order.

5

No I was not making fun -- too much -- but there were some good melodies, sophisticated chord changes, etc. Check the Fender 6/12 Christopher Cross was using around 1980. Must have been a custom order.

– DCBirdMan

I was thinking that too, that 12-string Fender hockeystick headstock.

6

It's always fun to make fun, but there's a lot of good material there, from some bands I almost always liked - Elton, Doobies, Hall & Oates, Gino Vanelli, Chris Chross, Foreigner's ballads (hated their rockers), 10cc.

And some one-off hits I always enjoyed: Year of the Cat, Baker Street.

And I played quite a few of these in bands. I'll admit to having been tapped to sing "Piña Colada." Wasn't proud of it even at the time.

But yeah. America, Bread, a few others of the practitioners...not so much.

7

Larry Knechtel was an impressive player. There’s some content to Bread, or he wouldn’t have been involved.

8

Or there was some content BECAUSE he was involved.

9

Hard to believe that "Pina Colada Song" and "Timothy" by The Bouys were written by the same Rupert Holmes...

anything for a buck, I suppose.

10

Not that I was a fan, but I'd met the kids from America when they were service brats at the USAF/RAF base I was stationed at in '71. I'd heard them playing in a little used building at a satellite base. Nice kids. Glad they did OK.

I liked some of the Doobie Bros. stuff, except for the Michael McDonald period. There was some good music in the '70s, and a lot that I'd like to forget.

11

I worked at a radio station that was transitioning to "Adult Contemporary" in 1979-80 and the Pina Colada song was on the playlist. I hate that stupid song with a passion!

I used to just skip over the Barry Manilow and Kenny Rogers songs when they would come up on the list. And yet, the Music Director was still able to sneak in Albert Collins' "Mastercharge" - they considered it jazz. That was the bright spot of my night.

12

Girls liked to make out with this stuff going on in the background.

13

I was (and am) a big, gooey fan of many of these sweet melodies that some folks mock. But, shhhh. Don’t tell anybody.

14

Wow. I should have watched the video before commenting. Some I like but a great deal of that schlock was likely to be what caused punk to explode and be embraced. I can see the guys in the Ramones listening to the radio back then and saying ,”screw this crap. Let’s go kick some ass.”

15

Wow. I should have watched the video before commenting. Some I like but a great deal of that schlock was likely to be what caused punk to explode and be embraced. I can see the guys in the Ramones listening to the radio back then and saying ,”screw this crap. Let’s go kick some ass.”

– Bob Howard

A lot of the soft rock was due to folks not wanting to embrace the psychedelic music of a couple of years earlier. I can easily see how it lead to punk. As bad a soft rock could be, it was still light years better than '60s bubblegum.

16

I love love love an awful lot of 60s bubblegum. Punk was a lot closer to the Monkees than the “serious” 60s bands.

But then, I also think the solo in Baker Street is a jaw dropper. So take from that what you will.

17

Well for me I heart 60s Dork Top 40 / and bubblegum -- still the 70s soft rock scene, I don't count Doobies, Linda Rondstadt etc as that! I'm talking Air Supply or that Ambrosia dude, or that awful 'Sad Eyes' song. But they wrote for an audience who they figured would buy the records, which they did. So to me some included in This Great Collection you should buy right now -- just aren't part of that genre.

But the 70s just was what it was... the decade of the Chevy Vega, Ford Pinto, some hideous clothes, heck even the Gretsch TK-300 some would say.

18

"soft rock freakout" is a contradiction in terms. and Al Stewart is/was a singer/songwriter, not a yacht-rock maven.

19

Ohhhh my goodness! I thought I had left that stuff behind me. It's funny, now, looking back and listening to those clips, and seeing how many I actually liked. The Pina Colada song is definitely in the round file, both then and now!

20

I like to be as broad minded as I can be about music but "soft rock" should not be a thing. Rock should not be soft. If it was it would be either mud or sand. I admit to having a soft-spot for Gerry Rafferty as that was the only album my first "real" girlfriend had that I could stand and lots of personal firsts happened to be accompanied by Baker St. I was 14 and she was gorgeous...

Where was I? oh yes - soft rock - it shouldn't be allowed. I am ashamed that Air Supply were from Australia and I would like to apologise on the behalf of Australians everywhere. Same with Little River Band. At least the Bee Gees only grew up here - they weren't born here. But Bread/America/Doobies etc - YUCK! Get me a bucket!

21

Aren’t you also responsible for Olivia Newton-Tootin?

22

I couldn’t make it through the whole thing - but surely the Eagles were included, no?

“Soft rock” is indeed a stupid term, and it’s being applied retroactively here to a fairly mixed bag.

Better to call all this what it was: Top 40 pop, incorporating (as was once the case) influences from a variety of more rigidly defined genre sources.

23

Every time I give the good lady a peck on the cheek, I mark a piece of paper to indicate that her kiss is now off my list.

24

Sirius XM offers a channel during the Summer, called “Yacht Rock,” where it is “always between the mid 70’s and low 80’s.“ Probably appropriate for this “genre.” I actually like a lot of this stuff, yes including Bread. But I’m always a sucker for a sappy ballad. The ladies like ‘em too.

25

You can lump it in with whatever genre, but 10cc's "I'm Not in Love" still sounds killer to me.


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