Miscellaneous Rumbles

Snake bite. Lesson learned.

1

Working on my yard today, wearing sandals, I learnt a lesson the hard way. Got tagged by a small copperhead snake. Hurts like hell. Third time I've been bitten by one. We have lots of them here. Gonna be off my feet for a day or two.

2

Yikes, be careful! Hope you're okay, UG. Yep, gotta have on the appropriate footwear when you're out there working on the yard.

3

Working on my yard today, wearing sandals, I learnt a lesson the hard way. Got tagged by a small copperhead snake. Hurts like hell. Third time I've been bitten by one. We have lots of them here. Gonna be off my feet for a day or two.

– UncleGrumpy

Hopefully you live not far from the hospital. Those are deadly. But I see you are okay now. You could have died. Glad you survived.

4

Copperheads are the worst, they strike first...ask questions later.

5

Dont go near Copperhead Rd.

6

Copperheads are the worst, they strike first...ask questions later.

– Twangmeisternyc

My vote goes for Cottonmouths (water moccasin)... I've encountered many copperheads, but never had one actually chase/pursue me.

I can't say that about cottonmouths. They are highly territorial and will chase you if necessary to evict you from their territory. I've even had them attempt to get into my boat while fishing.

7

Change you handle to Uncle Gimpy.

Hope you heal quickly. The little ones are filled with poison.

8

I hope at least Nurse Enid is keeping an eye on it. Good luck.

9

Being bit doesn't necessarily mean the snake injected poison. I've had several dogs throughout the years bitten on the nose, only one had enough poison to kill. The other's heads swelled up to alligator size, but eventually went back to normal. Important to get tetanus shots and probably a course of antibiotics as their mouths are full of nasties. Around here the bad ones are moccasins, diamondback rattlers are actually pretty reasonable. I've had three close encounters with them ,one where I stepped full weight on one that should have nailed me but didn't. Good thing my heart is good. It'll make you a soprano for about 30 seconds. My wife thought some woman was screaming when I did that. My bad for not paying attention.

10

Being bit doesn't necessarily mean the snake injected poison. I've had several dogs throughout the years bitten on the nose, only one had enough poison to kill. The other's heads swelled up to alligator size, but eventually went back to normal. Important to get tetanus shots and probably a course of antibiotics as their mouths are full of nasties. Around here the bad ones are moccasins, diamondback rattlers are actually pretty reasonable. I've had three close encounters with them ,one where I stepped full weight on one that should have nailed me but didn't. Good thing my heart is good. It'll make you a soprano for about 30 seconds. My wife thought some woman was screaming when I did that. My bad for not paying attention.

– Opie

Excellent point, Opie.

With North American pit vipers, the "dry strike" as a defense mechanism is a real thing.

11

Ouch! I feel for you guys. There are rattlers here in Wisconsin, but luckily, hardly any in my part of the state (the eastern part). The Pygmy Rattlesnakes are endangered, and at least 100-150 miles west of me. As for as I know, the big ones (the Timber Rattlesnakes) are in the west central part of the state.

12

Yard work in sandals?

you’re darn near asking for it buddy. You know that. Hope you get past it quickly.

I was with my Boy Scouts, as a leader once. We were rappelling down a rock and I was the ballet, which is the guy at the ground holding the end of the rope. I looked down to see, what I thought was a large night crawler worm. I went to grab it up and toss it when it bit the extra callous of skin at the edge of my finger. That’s when I realized it was a baby copper head. Luckily I was able to just bite off the extra skin and spit. This is one time I was grateful to have guitar finger callouses without using them for guitar playing. I still felt stupid about it.

13

These stories are creeping me out! We had a baby water moccasin on the back porch once and I was paranoid (extra cautious?) for months afterword.

I prefer falcons and penguins.

14

Nope ropes? Danger noodles? I want no part of them.

And, yeah, if you're in the brush, NO SANDALS!

15

Sorry to hear about your Snakebite John, I hope you heal quickly. I'm glad it wasn't worse, or a more venomous snake. Copperheads are nasty little buggers!

Living in Arizona, we're in rattlesnake paradise. I've had two dogs and one cat bitten by diamondbacks over the years. It's always been ugly, all three were envenomated, and had a tough time of it.

I've nearly been bitten several times, the most frightening was a seven foot + diamondback, that I was literally sitting on top of while I was in a dove hunting blind. I had ridden my motorcycle out to my favorite hunting area, and walked into the desert a good mile, to my favorite dove hunting blind. It was a small mesquite tree that was shaped like an umbrella, and the canopy still reached the ground all the way around. I had cleared out the center, and was sitting on a hunting stool against the trunk. Rain water had eroded a fissure beneath the trunk, and unbeknownst to me, a very large rattlesnake was camouflaged in the fissure. It was content to stay unnoticed for about 45 minutes, but I must have done something to alarm it and it started rattling, hissing, and striking! It savagely bit the top of my leather boot before I could get away from it. I panicked and forced my way through the thorny canopy, but left my shotgun inside.

I was shaking, heart racing, and took a moment to calm down. If that bite had been just a few inches higher, I would have been in a desperate situation. I would have needed to walk over a mile back to my motorcycle, with snake venom coursing through my veins. I gathered myself, and I looked back into the blind and sure enough there was a very thick rattlesnake, still boiling and posturing in the fissure. It actually looked like a whole nest of rattlesnakes, because it was so long. I contemplated what to do, I have a lot of respect for rattlesnakes and their place in the ecosystem, and I almost always give them a free pass. But this particular area was used by bird hunters, horseback riders and dirt bikers, and having a deadly snake this big, in that environment made me nervous. So I drew my sidearm, and shot the snake in the mouth, cleanly severing the spinal cord at the neck. I made a hook out of a small forked branch, and pulled it out of the fissure. It was absolutely gargantuan, over seven feet long and as thick as my bicep in middle. I field dressed it, and put it in my kill bag that had blue ice inside of it.

Rattlesnake makes a fine meal, so I chopped the snake into two inch pieces. They look like fishsteaks, with the same kind of back bone and ribs, and the meat is white. We separated the pieces into three gallon size baggies, for three separate meals, then we took the pieces from one of the baggies and covered them with seasoned flour. We deep fried the pieces until they floated. Rattlesnake meat is very sweet and delicate, delicious, and tastes like a cross between a quails breast and frog legs. Once you get over the psychological barrier, it's a wonderful, tasty meal. Having pieces of rattlesnake this large is very rare, and would be extremely expensive to buy.

I tanned the snakeskin with a commercial product called 'Reptan', and mounted the hide on an eight foot long eighteen inch wide shellaced pine board with a routed edge. I shellaced the skin, and hung the board on the wall above a large window in our den. Stretched out and mounted, the skin measured seven and a half feet long, and sixteen inches wide in the center. The rattle had thirteen segments before it broke off. It's the largest rattlesnake skin I've ever seen, and I still have it. It's now on the garage wall of our new house, my wife (for some odd reason) didn't want it in the house!

I stopped hunting quite a few years ago. I haven't hunted since 1995, when my daughter was born. I was thirty-five years old, and the miracle of a child had a profound impact on me. I lost all desire to take life, even if I was going to eat the animals I killed (which I always did). I certainly could hunt again in a survival situation, but not as a 'hobby'. For me, it was the hunt that I enjoyed most, not the kill. I find that same enjoyment with a camera or binoculars now days.

16

I used to play with snakes. My cousins taught me the game of hunting them with a flashlight and a stick.

They were nuts.

We'd capture the snakes, then fling them at each other, laughing.

Idiot things I used to do.

17

I'm good. Feel a bit flu like but back to clearing land. I've taken to banging a sledge hammer on nearby rocks to scare them off.

18

Glad to hear it Grumpy! Wade,that's the way to eat RS. Like you I'll kill 'em if livestock or dogs might get bitten,but I never feel good about it.

19

Not much threat of venomous snakes here in Andalucia Spain but, man, the terrain sure doesn't lend it self to working in sandals! And that was the third time bit? I'll be polite and so I hope 3rd time's the charm.

20

Glad you’re healing up. Down here, Copperheads are kinda shy, they’d rather run than fight. And they’re different to your Copperheads. Speaking of down here, we’ve got something like 15 of the top 20 venomous snakes in the world..(not too sure exactly). Always careful !!

21

When I saw “snakebite,” I didn’t even have to look to see who posted it.

So far, Grump, you’re some combination of immortal and simply disdainful of pain and injury. May that combination last till you learn fear and caution...like the rest of us mortals.

22

When I saw “snakebite,” I didn’t even have to look to see who posted it.

So far, Grump, you’re some combination of immortal and simply disdainful of pain and injury. May that combination last till you learn fear and caution...like the rest of us mortals.

– Proteus

100% this.

23

When I saw “snakebite,” I didn’t even have to look to see who posted it.

So far, Grump, you’re some combination of immortal and simply disdainful of pain and injury. May that combination last till you learn fear and caution...like the rest of us mortals.

– Proteus

Has he talk about the bears in his backyard?

24

We live in southeast Arizona, in Mojave rattlesnake country. We typically shoot 10+ a year, in out yard and where we walk the dogs. We live on the edge of the desert on the shore of a dry lake, the Willcox Playa.

We lost a lovely cat to a rattlesnake bit once.

Mohaves are aggressive and have a neurotoxin poison

25

We live in southeast Arizona, in Mojave rattlesnake country. We typically shoot 10+ a year, in out yard and where we walk the dogs. We live on the edge of the desert on the shore of a dry lake, the Willcox Playa.

We lost a lovely cat to a rattlesnake bit once.

Mohaves are aggressive and have a neurotoxin poison

– WinnieThomas

On the toxicity scale, Mohaves are #1. Diamondbacks are most dangerous due to the high volume of venom delivered, they're being larger snakes but not particularly their toxicity. They're all to be avoided at all costs though!


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