Miscellaneous Rumbles

“Punk Rock”

1

Ok I know I’m inviting all sorts of high and mighty opinions-as-facts here. Just wondering if anybody is currently enjoying any punk bands? From 70’s punk to modern punk? I’ve been on a huge Swingin’ Utters kick lately. Hard to believe they’ve been around for 30 years I was a big fan back in the 90’s. As I’ve been listening to them I’ve realized that I haven’t heard or gotten into any new or more recent punk bands. Any suggestions?

2

Lots of "old school" punks here.

Listened to Ramones when it would get you beat up, but really rode on that 2nd wave of American punk...Hüsker Dü, Minutemen, X, 7 Seconds, DKs, etc.

Admittedly, I rebelled against Green Day and Rancid because of how derivative they were without giving credit to the Jam and the Clash, respectively, but they grew on me slightly.

Currently everyone in the house is digging King Gizzard and the Wizard Lizard, from Australia. Been to a couple shows, and they've been great. New, exciting, microtonal music. Fun to watch, too.

3

Punk was a necessary reaction to the turgid corporate rock of the mid-to-late 70's, but I've never really enjoyed listening to it. I like some of the Clash, but the songs of theirs I like ("Train in Vain," "Rocking the Casbah," "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" for example) sound more sophisticated. The first couple of Police albums had a punky vibe, but were musically advanced --- Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers were virtuosi even then.

4

Ive been on that kick since I started listening to music, its what got me into the whole thing. I discovered Gretsch through the cramps, new York dolls and X.

5

Lost my hair over the years but I'm still into it. And for some reason I prefer the stuff that was already there before I was old enough. Still get my chills when I hear:

or:

or (the essence of Rock'n'Roll):

6

Punk was a necessary reaction to the turgid corporate rock of the mid-to-late 70's, but I've never really enjoyed listening to it. I like some of the Clash, but the songs of theirs I like ("Train in Vain," "Rocking the Casbah," "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" for example) sound more sophisticated. The first couple of Police albums had a punky vibe, but were musically advanced --- Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers were virtuosi even then.

– Parabar

Howdy Parabar, These guys are one of My all time favorite Bands. Even though they are not your typical Punk Band they came out of the English Punk scene back in the early 70's. They are worth a listen.

7

Punk rock got going around 1974 and was mainstream by 1976? It was a necessary reaction to tedious prog rock, arena blues rock, etc. At the time I wasn't into it but later came to appreciate some of it. US punk Brit punk, whatever.

8

I came out of the L.A. Punk scene in 1981 and have seen just about every single Punk band to come thru L.A. I tend to keep up with some of the newer Bands but always go to the tried and true Punk bands of the past.

Some of the newer Bands that I like are not really new anymore, Turbo A.C.'s out of New York are a solid Punk band with good Lyrics, and Riffs to match.

I usually head out to Punk Rock Bowling and Punk Rock Picnic (no longer held)to see a Mix of the Latest Bands and the old skool bands. You can google these to get a Lineup of the Bands and see what picks your interest.

9

Growing up in the UK in the mid 70s, I was there when the the UK punk scene exploded and it seemed like every TV newscast and newspaper front page was declaring it the end of civilization.

Being a hardcore Rockabilly kid I wasn’t that impressed with punk initially until I started to see the similarities in both ‘genres’. By the early 80s I was a huge fan of the Sex Pistols, Stiff Little Fingers, X-Ray Spex, The Damned et al.

I love the Ramones and Dead Kennedys too...and Rancid...but I’ll always be more drawn to the Brit punk I grew up with.

10

I liked Blue Cheer, the MC5, Iggy Pop, and The Monks. Proto-punk?

By the time punk so-called happened, I was so besotted (and generally satisfied, though getting overstuffed) by that tedious prog rock that punk seemed devolutional to me. When prog either petered out or tottered over from its own topheaviness (your choice), I went on to listen to fusion and jazz. The Police and XTC caught my attention, and I recognized their punk influences...but responded to everything else they poured in. (Dire Straits, in a different way, was a return to straight plain ol' guitar music - with good songwriting - and I liked that.)

I now respect what it punk was, is, and had to do. I'd grown up with the evolution of music basically from the Beatles through both prog and metal (with detours into the past to find the roots of both). Punk seemed to me to reset the evolution - musically - to mid-60s garage rock. Great stuff...when I was a mid-60s garage-rocker. Not so much, to me, 10 years later. Perhaps to overgeneralize, there was a generational component.

The content of punk, particularly British, with the political statements and anti-statements - that was fresh, relevant, and not "devolutional." The angst, disaffection, and alienation in all of it was as necessary, fresh, and rock&roll as it had been every other time it had reared its head in rock (and never did it rear so clearly as in punk). In that way punk was "progressive." In how plainly and in what raw terms it made its points, it set a new benchmark in rock expression. It was early Who for a new generaion. But...again...I was at a time in my life where it wasn't speaking to me.

Like Parabar, I think I get punk's necessity and how it rose organically - and I acknowledge the genuine "rock & roll" energy, and often find it melodic (and certainly economical in form and delivery). But it doesn't often fall pleasantly on my po old ears.

11

I was so glad when Punk crashed thru the door. It was rock man, hard as a barrelhouse pianos keys right into the primal ooze of righteous rebellion. Certainly cleaned out the cobwebs,at least for a while. That said, the stuff that really carries me today is early Costello, Police,Clash, Joe Jackson. Hardcore fans will dispute the inclusion of some of those. That's all right,F&%K off

12

Grew up listening to punk rock from the late 70’s and early 80’s.

The Clash, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols, Dead Kennedy’s, X, etc.

I real don’t like any “modern punk” bands.... I’m not sure I’d call any modern bands punk rock.

The anger was real from the 1st generation punk bands. I often wonder when I listen to any modern “aggressive” music (which isn’t too often) what the hell are they angry about? Seems like shouting for the sake of shouting.

13

Will always listen to punk. My kids make me turn it down.

14

You don't "listen" to punk. You experience it. Go To Shows. See new bands.

Or at least see old ones. The Damned are on tour--I saw them a year or so ago doing the 40th anniversary show of when they opened for the Sex Pistols--they sound great. Iggy still tours and his shows are outrageous. Ignore the latest album--he just plays the hits. How about this: go see The Reverend Horton Heat when he swings by and get there early enough to see the two opening bands--especially the local one. You'll be surprised at how much punk is still alive.

Not just in NYC or LA or Detroit. I mean in cities like South Bend (The Distractions), Kansas City (The Uncouth), Ontario (Single Mothers), Sonoma (Tsunami Bomb), Jersey Shore (Night Birds)...

15

I didn't think I liked music when I was a kid. The stuff I heard at the house was my mom's Lionel Ritchie, Olivia Newton and my dad really only listened to Jan and Dean and the beach boys. The radio of the early to mid 80's was dominated by hair metal excess or saccharine Debbie Gibson style pop. So I just assumed I was one of those people who didn't actually like music. If I had to choose something it would be the ventures or big band swing.

So imagine my surprise when one Sunday night I was flipping through the radio after the family went to sleep and I heard something that literally made me jump off the top bunk of the bunk beds. I had no idea what it was but I knew I loved it. The song was "the boys are out tonight" by the blitz.

A few months later again the family was asleep and I was watching night flight and they were showing "Another state of mind" and that is when I learned what I actually liked was called "punk rock" I was mesmerized, transfixed. It was a genuine life changing moment.

Once I knew what it was called I could find more. I watched "decline of Western Civilization" and i saw Billy being the coolest dude in the room and went out the next day to buy a guitar.

Punk rock taught me how to love music. My tastes did grow and expand but it is still my main love.

I still play it, go see several shows a month, I still follow maximum rock and roll. I'm the wierd middle aged dude at house shows. I was lucky enough to be playing shows and touring the west coast in the early 90's. I brought my nephew up in the scene and delight in now watching his band tour .

I love almost all of it. I can't stomach the fat records mess boogie sound stuff. No fx and their ilk.

The 90's math rock dischordant stuff really suits me. Drive like Jehu, Slint, Lync. I really loved the post "revolution summer" Washington DC stuff as well.

These days I am really enjoying the early first wave UK stuff, particularly the ones that didn't really make it over here until the internet. The cigarettes, the wasps, swell maps. Everyone had their own take on it and it wasn't so formulaic.

16

despite being a stone Deadhead, i got the Pistols right away. they seemed such a logical reaction to the 70s, and as Greil Marcus wrote Steve Jones "sound(ed) more like a guitar factory than a guitar"...they rocked like Mott the Hoople (now, there's a name you haven't heard in years!) at the gates of hell. and of course, Neil Young's embrace of punk semiotics affected me deeply as i was a Neil freak. my working knowledge of punk was limited to the Decline of Western Civilization and articles in Trouser Press though until i met my second wife, a New York punk-rock girl. she turned me onto Hüsker Dü, Wire, Mission of Burma, the Minutemen, Pere Ubu, Television, and a whole lot of other stuff that really enriched my life. i particularly like the kind of punk-esque stuff that's angular and almost atonal, like Burma, Gang of Four, or The Fall. i find the racket and anger bracing...there's nothing like "Anarchy in the UK," "Mannequin," or "That's When I Reach For My Revolver" to get me going in the morning.

17

"The 90's math rock dischordant stuff really suits me. Drive like Jehu, Slint, Lync. I really loved the post "revolution summer" Washington DC stuff as well."

what's your stance on 00s post-rock a la godspeed you black emperor! or Mogwai?

18

I always was and still am into Punk and specially Oi! music. Some of my alltime favs beside the whole "classic" bands

19

I know it's considered post-punk or math-rock, but Shellac triggers many of the same feelings and enjoyment brought on by the original punk movement.

20

"The 90's math rock dischordant stuff really suits me. Drive like Jehu, Slint, Lync. I really loved the post "revolution summer" Washington DC stuff as well."

what's your stance on 00s post-rock a la godspeed you black emperor! or Mogwai?

– macphisto

I have heard some mogwai but haven't heard it in a long time. I will plug both of those into one the streaming services tomorrow and see how I feel.

21

Never got into any of the Punk. Always thought of it as mad, bad garage band stuff. Guess that was the point, being hacked about something.

That's cool, but just no interest to me.

22

Black Flag, JFA, early Clash, Misfits.... perfect. Though not “punk” in the classic sense, Radio Birdman was alternative sixteen years before anyone considered applying that strange word to music.

The bands that stayed together long enough and mutated were also interesting (Black Flag starting as a short-song band and graduating to 7-minute avant- noise jazz epics, or Minor Threat carrying over into Fugazi and bringing something groovy and new but redefining what the guitar can do) really stokes my vision of what can be accomplished if you BELIEVE in what you’re doing even when others may not. Punk WAS so great. The new stuff sounds kinda clean to me. I attribute that to digital home recording being so readily available. Thank you, Greg Ginn!

23

You don't "listen" to punk. You experience it. Go To Shows. See new bands.

Exactly! That's what kept me from ever diving into punk real deep. If I were to go to a show I would have beet the hell out of the first guy who spewed bodily fluids at me. From what I heard, there was some real nasty stuff going on in the audience and on stage. I don't need all that but I love some of the music. I get it that, that was part of the whole culture but that's not a culture I'm interested in. I did soak up as much of it as I could but it was mostly the mainstream stuff that would get some radio play, so my knowledge of it all isn't real extensive.

24

@Manny: was the LA punk scene of the 80s as scary as it seems with all those photos of the Huntington Beach suedeheads pummeling each other? or was that a hardcore thing? i've always wondered...in those days i tried to get folks i knew to go to punk shows in SF but nobody i knew had the balls to go with me and i didn't have a car. i figured i'd probably get crap for being a hippie, but i was used to that years before punk broke.

25

I really struggle with most modern punk bands for pretty much the same reason I really struggle with most modern rockabilly bands: both were very much of their moment, and when they burst forth they were wild and primal and unfettered by rules. Over time that original impact gets muted, but tons of rules and conventions rise up to ensure the purity of genres that were proudly impure to begin with. So it ends up sounding all about the same, while never satisfying the itch it originally scratched. Or worse, it falls prey to the uniformity police.

But that's just me.


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