Miscellaneous Rumbles

Phil Spector dead

1

I felt weird saying "RIP", because he's a convicted murderer and all...

The music he created sure was iconic tho!

2

It is kinda wierd but RIP Phil. Thanks for the music.

3

Just posted this elsewhere, in a Beatles FB group

"Sad how things ended up for him. But it seems his erratic behavior was there from the start. Things got scary in the 1975 sessions for the John Lennon Rock and Roll album.

It just occurred to me that George was the only one who did not do an oldies album. John was 1975, Ringo 1983, Paul, 1999. George did cover a few oldies ... including Got My Mind Set On You."

But still he was a mad genius although a difficult person//// add guns to the mix and it can't end well.

5

Having read Ronnie's biography it's hard to feel any sympathy for him. The music he made still stands up but. . .

6

George did cover a few oldies ... including Got My Mind Set On You."

He also did “The Devil & the Deep Blue Sea” and the Everly’s “Bye Bye Love”...”I hope you’re happy, the Clapper, too.”

7

As far as Phil goes, I’m sad for him and how his mental condition landed him in a pickle.

I was never a fan of the wall of sound. I liked some of the music he produced, but I thought it all needed 10 or 20 (or 30) less musicians in the room. I prefer simpler. I guess that’s why I’m a drummer in a 2 piece band.

8

Bully-turned-murderer.

I think Lana Clarkson’s final moments were a lot sadder.

9

A tragic trajectory, brilliance laced with madness. Our sonic memories would be poorer without the epic majesty of tracks like “Be My Baby,” “Lovin’ Feelin,” and “River Deep,” not to mention slightly less intense outings like the Let it Be album and the justly immortal “Imagine.”

Spector famously preferred singles over albums, and preferred mono to stereo. Much as I like individual songs and revere George Harrison in general, I find it hard to get through All Things Must Pass in one sitting. Maybe Phil was right about the duration of aural tolerance for his production techniques: a whole album of that relentless density is just exhausting.

It must have been more exhausting to live inside his head. Wiki says the deterioration of his health in prison was clear, and that he’d lost the ability to speak in 2014.

So much achievement, so young, and such a long sad decline - and so much damage done to others.

In the category of brilliant, groundbreaking producers who shaped how we hear music - and whose demons exploded in violence - I can’t help thinking of Joe Meek, who was in some ways Britain’s Phil Spector (or vice versa). Despite apparent inner torment, both gave so much creatively; both were unforgivable; both paid the price.

10

Bully-turned-murderer.

I think Lana Clarkson’s final moments were a lot sadder.

– Deke Martin

Agreed.

His Pyrenees Castle, which was what his mansion was called, is about 4 miles from me. I was surprised to learn I lived near him. When I heard about the murder I did learn he lived in the general vicinity that I do so being a fan I drove by and saw all the LA Country Sheriff cars there and Alhambra PD as well.

I reserved any thoughts on what happened. But it was pretty clear fast that he didn't do this "by accident". I have no sympathy fro him. It's sad what happened to Lana Clarkson and the aftermath for her family and friends.

I still like the music he has done, and although he was a wack job when he did the music it was years before he killed Lana Clarkson so I can listen to it. I also like his work with The Ramones on "The End of the Century" album but I hear they were not happy with working with him or the results.

11

Phil's story reminds me of Jim Gordon, the brilliant drummer whose galloping schizophrenia eventually led him to beat his Mom to death with a hammer. both men were incredibly talented, and suffered from severe untreated/barely treated mental disorders. it's hard to know where to draw the line...for Morrissey i quit as soon as he sang the lyric "life is hard enough when you belong here" in an opus charmingly titled "Bengali In Platforms." but thankfully when he was with The Smiths he was only a garden-variety asshole rather than a full-on racist and extreme nationalist, and if i did a Stalinist purge of everybody in my music collection who's an asshole i'd have 70% less to listen to.

Spector is a particularly tough call because he was so out-of-control so early, but you can't whitewash him out of rock 'n' roll history any more than Ike Turner or Joe "Michael's Father" Jackson. perhaps the sturm und drang of the Wall Of Sound, with different vocal and instrumental leads trading back and forth in front of a raging, barely-controlled backdrop that constantly threatened to drown the singers in a tidal wave of horns, strings, and percussionists, was in some way reflective of Phil's inner life. was it a way to escape into a musical world all his own like Brian Wilson? a method of purging his inner turmoil by objectifying it into music and form? a form of soft-edged aggression to bury the world under a collapsing Wall Of Sound? a set of negative behaviors assumed as an emotional shield that ossified into the awful person he became because like Elvis Presley nobody told him "no"? hell if i know.

12

While I liked much (but by no means all) of the music he created in the studio, the more I learned about how he created it made it harder and harder to enjoy the product he produced.

All in all, a very tragic life, which ended precisely where it had to.

Perhaps, just perhaps, he's finally at peace.

13

one can only hope. it seems he didn't find much peace, if any, in life.

14

I've always tried to keep the man and the music he produced separate in my head -- I'm certainly glad I never knew him. But I love the old wall of sound hits. Well, some of it -- Crystals, Ronettes etc.

15

I remember the thread where we discussed how to treat bad people's art. Spector is a perfect paradigm. I'm usually torn between my general interest in stories and biographies on one side and the consequences this can bring on the other.

I don't know too much about Phil Spector's life but enough to stay away from further investigation. There is so much music he was involved in that I love. He actually even did some good stuff in the '70s when he produced most of Dion's "Born to be with you" album which is great. Cher is another person who didn't get along with him (and I can only imagine why). They did a few songs together in the 70s too that ended up in one or two now ultra-rare 7"s and the song "A woman's story" is one of my favourite tunes of all times. It's so full of drama and tragedy that it almost hurts.

16

Resting in peace.

Reminds me of that ol' joke about Mozart's music being heard played backwards near his gravesite. "He's decomposing".

Information may not be lost to the Universe, but I suspect that as atomic bonds continue to break down and compounds disintegrate, any wholesale communication within the carcass ceases to exist and peace is more likely.

Doncha think?

17

I think when consciousness shuts down for good, all emergent and evanescent notions of identity, torment, or bliss flitting across the neurons of that particular brain simply cease.

Brain: hardware. Mind: software. Consciousness: RAM.

Pfft.

18

Weird, I thought he was already dead. Think I confused him with Manson how ever, I have his collection. Phil's, not Charles'.

19

There is substantial evidence that while the physical shuts down for good and decomposes, consciousness never does, being part of the Universal Consciousness that gives rise to creation. Einstein's Relativity Theory posits that matter and energy are essentially the same thing, only in different forms, so nothing can cease to exist, only change forms.

All of the world's spiritual traditions say essentially the same thing, only with different language. The specifics of what happens to consciousness when the body dies is the big mystery and the big adventure.

I for one will continue to revere the great music Phil created (which I consider to be the "real" Phil Spector) while deploring his malevolent actions and the harm and pain he caused. In older times, he would have been called "possessed" --- severe mental illness can look a lot like demonic possession, and can be just as difficult to treat, let alone cure.

20

The wall of sound lived in his head. Clangorous and dangerous. Separating reality from ego. He was never able to get over that wall. More's the pity...

21

More like The Wall of Un Sound.

He made some great records but he was no Jack Nitzsche.

I'm indifferent towards the fact that he's dead. Saves the US tax payers some money I suppose.

22

When ever I hear of people living with a condition like Phil's - I'm just glad it's not me.

This is from Ronnie

"It’s a sad day for music and a sad day for me. When I was working with Phil Spector, watching him create in the recording studio, I knew I was working with the very best. He was in complete control, directing everyone. So much to love about those days.

Meeting him and falling in love was like a fairytale. The magical music we were able to make together, was inspired by our love. I loved him madly, and gave my heart and soul to him.

As I said many times while he was alive, he was a brilliant producer, but a lousy husband.

Unfortunately Phil was not able to live and function outside of the recording studio. Darkness set in, many lives were damaged.

I still smile whenever I hear the music we made together, and always will. The music will be forever"

23

There is substantial evidence that while the physical shuts down for good and decomposes, consciousness never does, being part of the Universal Consciousness that gives rise to creation. Einstein's Relativity Theory posits that matter and energy are essentially the same thing, only in different forms, so nothing can cease to exist, only change forms.

All of the world's spiritual traditions say essentially the same thing, only with different language. The specifics of what happens to consciousness when the body dies is the big mystery and the big adventure.

I for one will continue to revere the great music Phil created (which I consider to be the "real" Phil Spector) while deploring his malevolent actions and the harm and pain he caused. In older times, he would have been called "possessed" --- severe mental illness can look a lot like demonic possession, and can be just as difficult to treat, let alone cure.

– Parabar

Einstein was cool alright. Personally I like his most famous formula flipped as M=E/C2.

Slow energetic particles down from light speed by giving them something important to do that takes time and there ya go. Matter. Use a Higgs if ya wanna. Or conjure Virtual Particles, but be quick about it!

Universal consciousness? I dunno. Science is simply what we Know Now. And they's lots we don't know yet. There are some studies that seem to indicate some spooky interactions in organic chemistry at the protein level among certain atoms going about their daily routines, but the jury is still out. .....literally! Outta the country, outta their university labs here in the US! Bring 'em back! We need answers! We need ever better questions!

24

So many people dislike his Wall of Sound. Maybe its just to over the top and too bombastic but I like it. I love the hugeness of it and the force it portrays.

Sounds so good -

25

It just sounds like the 60s to me. Something my Dad would listen to. 60s soft rock. Ugh.


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