Miscellaneous Rumbles

Now on Netflix; Echo In The Canyon

1

This recent documentary surrounding the music coming out of Laurel Canyon, from roughly 1965 to 1970, is now streaming on Netflix. If you subscribe, you should avail yourself. It's a real treat.

It's atypical of most music docs in that the film parallels with Jakob Dylan's revisiting some of the music of that place and time. He covers songs by Brian Wilson, The Buffalo Springfield, The Mama's & The Papa's, and it's shown both in the studio and on stage, with guest vocalists.

That in itself is a nice homage, as the material they cover is well arranged, and embraced with the subtlety it deserves.

But what's really dominant are the accompanying interviews with the luminaries of the time. That really make this film a great watch.

Being the prodigal son of Bob Dylan, and a respected musician in his own right, Jakob gets pretty intimate time and revealing interviews with Crosby, Nash, Stills, Roger McGuinn, Michelle Phillips, Jackson Browne, John Sebastian, Lou Adler, Tom Petty, .. all waxing on the times and how special it was for them.

Dylan also visits some of the surviving LA landmarks and studios where many of those hits were laid on tape.

The icing for some here would be witnessing the love for great guitars all these guys had (and have). Due context is paid to the Ric 12-string, and its contribution via Harrison & McGuinn, but the footage used for this doc (then and now) is still rife with some classics throughout, especially Gretsch hollow bodies.

If you get a chance, see this documentary. It's a good companion to 'The Wrecking Crew' doc.

2

I had no idea it was now on Netflix. Can't wait to watch it! I love the soundtrack!

3

As good as this was throughout, the footage used during the closing credits is some of the most compelling.

It cuts to Neil Young in the studio, laying down his guitar track for Jakob's cover of The Byrd's 'What's Happening?'

Young is shown in a recording room, wielding 'old black'. You can hear exactly what he's playing, which is some of the most stunning and sensitive I've heard from him. Just incredible guitar.

And to watch Neil really 'own' the space while doing it, pacing and stomping while playing, is so beautiful to behold. His attack is still raw and primal, like watching a lion who's just been fed red meat.
He is captured in his element here, and it gave me chills watching it.

4

Oh wow! Didn't know this had made it to Netflix. Been looking forward to seeing it. Thanks for posting and letting everyone know!

6

That's cool! I rented it from Amazon a few weeks back and really enjoyed it. Along with the obligatory Ric, lots of Gretsch sightings, too. Can't wait to watch it again.

7

Great! Thanks for the tip!

8

I saw this at our local arthouse theater and loved it. The music in this film is right in the wheelhouse of the music I love and it is obvious that everyone involved really enjoyed making this movie.

BTW nice sports car Jakob.

9

As good as this was throughout, the footage used during the closing credits is some of the most compelling.

It cuts to Neil Young in the studio, laying down his guitar track for Jakob's cover of The Byrd's 'What's Happening?'

Young is shown in a recording room, wielding 'old black'. You can hear exactly what he's playing, which is some of the most stunning and sensitive I've heard from him. Just incredible guitar.

And to watch Neil really 'own' the space while doing it, pacing and stomping while playing, is so beautiful to behold. His attack is still raw and primal, like watching a lion who's just been fed red meat.
He is captured in his element here, and it gave me chills watching it.

– Edison

Yes, I couldn't figure out why they would show such great footage of Neil Young at the end but not include him in the documentary itself.

10

Watched it again last night for the third time. I really love this film, the musical period and the performances. And after seeing the interviews, I find it amazing that after all these years and all those drugs everyone is still so sharp. Names, dates, places....it gives me hope.

11

Grrr... I have Netflix, but it seems no such a program here in Finland. Darn divided marketing.

12

Yes, I couldn't figure out why they would show such great footage of Neil Young at the end but not include him in the documentary itself.

– Brian_66

Neil Young's absence from the interviews in this film is noticeable, especially since he was such an integral part of the music scene back then.

It may have simply been a timing conflict, his notorious reclusiveness, or at worst; Young's hesitation to wax nostalgic in any interviews. Almost certainly, if there's an intent to romanticize, or establish some 'halcyon days' narrative.

Ultimately I'm not sure what that's about, but his participation on Jakob Dylan's accompanying album of covers seems to imply he was into the effort.

I will say; he was throwing down in that recording booth like he meant it.

14

I'm pulling it up right now, I'll check back in after I finish watching it.

15

I watched it this afternoon, it's a cool documentary, I enjoyed it very much. Jakob Dylan did a great job putting this together, and hosting it.

16

This film is full of earworms. You’ll walk around with parts of songs in your head for days after.You’ve been warned.

Jade Castrinos can darn well sing! Holy thunderbuckets! Floored me.

17

This film is full of earworms. You’ll walk around with parts of songs in your head for days after.You’ve been warned.

Jade Castrinos can darn well sing! Holy thunderbuckets! Floored me.

– Threadkiller

No kidding. Best performance of the movie IMHO. Her joyful interpretation of such a heartbreaking song, dancing and twirling. I was completely mesmerized.

18

As good as this was throughout, the footage used during the closing credits is some of the most compelling.

It cuts to Neil Young in the studio, laying down his guitar track for Jakob's cover of The Byrd's 'What's Happening?'

Young is shown in a recording room, wielding 'old black'. You can hear exactly what he's playing, which is some of the most stunning and sensitive I've heard from him. Just incredible guitar.

And to watch Neil really 'own' the space while doing it, pacing and stomping while playing, is so beautiful to behold. His attack is still raw and primal, like watching a lion who's just been fed red meat.
He is captured in his element here, and it gave me chills watching it.

– Edison

I saw that too, Edison! It was absolutely brilliant. I've been a Neil Young fan for decades. There is and was, just something about the rawness of his music, that appeals to me. His thin and whining voice, by all accounts, is just awful, but great at the same time!


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