Miscellaneous Rumbles

Now about these US regional accents and experssions…

26

I'm from coastal Southern California but currently living in a small college town in rural Mississippi for about 5 years now. I've heard the expression "that boy needs to get his mind right." a couple of times. I once heard during a cloudburst "It's coming down like a double cunted cow peeing on a flat rock" My impression so far is that law enforcement here is more often about generating revenue and keeping a certain segment of the population repressed.

– Gregory_Pecarry

Hey Gregory! What part of Mississippi (I could guess because there aren't a log of colleges here)? I'm in Vicksburg.

As another transplant, I can share your sentiment.

27

Excellent points, y'all. I might get Susy to chime in:

Wow, thanks so much for all your ideas and input. Deed Eddy must indeed be a very clever woman because she has asked an important question (something I should have addressed from the start). My baddie is indeed very bad. He's a young guy raised in an abusive family who then killed his father and then "disappeared." He's not educated but he's highly manipulative and likes playing with his victims. In this current version he was raised in Texas but I think I'll change this to Louisiana. He also doesn't talk that much but wants to let his victim know he's superior. So he might say something along the lines of "I ain't fixing to kill ya'll right quick, this might take some time" - thanks, Spartanman. I'm interested in words and language so this is riveting to me.

28

otter pretty much got it. Watch Swamp People on history channel for a reference of the Cajun accent. They mix in French words or saying quite a bit. North LA is pretty much typical Southern accent.

– Mark StJohn

yep, "Swamp People" would be a good one to watch. once "Troy"(one of the main characters in that series) said "let me get situated". I had to explain the expression to my wife from Michigan. I was born and raised in Baton Rouge. oh, and a "hose pipe" is a water hose in the Baton Rouge area.

another good TV series to watch would be "NCIS - New Orleans". as mentioned earlier, find some Justin Wilson videos on youtube, especially some stories from his early days on albums.

29

Excellent points, y'all. I might get Susy to chime in:

Wow, thanks so much for all your ideas and input. Deed Eddy must indeed be a very clever woman because she has asked an important question (something I should have addressed from the start). My baddie is indeed very bad. He's a young guy raised in an abusive family who then killed his father and then "disappeared." He's not educated but he's highly manipulative and likes playing with his victims. In this current version he was raised in Texas but I think I'll change this to Louisiana. He also doesn't talk that much but wants to let his victim know he's superior. So he might say something along the lines of "I ain't fixing to kill ya'll right quick, this might take some time" - thanks, Spartanman. I'm interested in words and language so this is riveting to me.

– JimmyR

I dunno, "I ain't fixing to kill ya'll right quick, this might take some time", this sounds more like Sam Elliot in a western movie than a southern bad guy.

31

Hose pipe is a very British term.

– wabash slim

well, we use it in Baton Rouge, too.

32

Hose pipe, yep, here too. Lots of folks. Here would be middle Tennessee. Not everyone says ain't. Maybe his mama was abusive yet insistent that he use proper grammar. Just sayin'.

33

"I ain't fixing to kill ya'll right quick, this might take some time"

In case that's not just a typo, remember that y'all is plural, so your villain would only say that if he were talking to multiple victims. Also note that the x in "fixin' to" is often silent. It usually comes out more like "finta" or "finna".

Come visit Mississippi. You'd think everyone was a mechanic with all the fixin they talk about.

PS I think he would say "Set down a spell. I ain't fixin' ta kill you right quick. This might take a while." Note the "i" in while is a short A sound that lasts an extra beat.

34

Obviously this all takes a good amount of consideration. Find a good place to think it through. I would recommend a booth at your nearest Luby's.

35

My Dad is from Iowa and he always said / says, "Well hold on, let me get situated." I even say that now from time to time.

He also says, "Slicker than a gut" and "Slicker than snot on a door knob."

Oh and he also still calls the refrigerator the "ice box" as did my grandmother, although my grandfather who grew up in San Francisco called it the "reefer" - -no not that kind of reefer. That's what hippies smoked. Of course he thought anyone with hair longer than a crew cut was a hippie.

36

"I ain't fixing to kill ya'll right quick, this might take some time"

In case that's not just a typo, remember that y'all is plural, so your villain would only say that if he were talking to multiple victims. Also note that the x in "fixin' to" is often silent. It usually comes out more like "finta" or "finna".

Come visit Mississippi. You'd think everyone was a mechanic with all the fixin they talk about.

PS I think he would say "Set down a spell. I ain't fixin' ta kill you right quick. This might take a while." Note the "i" in while is a short A sound that lasts an extra beat.

– Otter

"Y'all" is also used as a singular in many, many parts of the South.

Yes, you may address a single person as "y'all." It's more common than you think.

"You'uns" or "You'ens" is also used as singular or plural, but it's mostly used in some pockets along the Cumberland Plateau and in some areas of Appalachia-- not very widely used elsewhere, although it can be found here and there.

Also, Southern colloquial vernacular, regardless of dialect often involves double negative or unnecessarily reinforced negative action... for example:

"Billy Joe's been down in his back for a week-- it's got to where he can't hardly walk..."

in this case, "can't hardly" (a contraction of "cannot hardly") is an unnecessary reinforced statement in the negative-- which means that Billy Joe is having a difficult time walking. This sort of reinforcement is very, very common across the entire Deep South-- "Ain't never", "Can't hardly", "Couldn't hardly", "Shouldn't Ought'a", etc.

"Ain't" is interesting in itself-- while not purely Southern, technically, it is supposed to be a contraction of "am not". However, in the South it is also used interchangeably as a substitute contraction of "is not" and "are not".

"There" is another interesting word-- often pronounced without the "th" at all, particularly when ending a sentence-- in this case "there is pronounced very similar to "air":

"Hey mama, Jimmy's sittin' at the drugstore right over 'ere."

in fact, in this case, "over 'ere" is usually condensed into one syllabic stream- sounding more like "ov'ere".

In many areas of Louisiana, "There" is pronounced as "dare" with a much softer "D"; except in the classic New Orleans vernacular, where it is more often pronounced as "They-ah".

Also, In the entire state of Louisiana, there are probably less than 100 people who actually pronounce the state's name correctly in the phonetic sense (Loo-wee-zee-ana)... most of them are either transplanted Yankees or high-brow professors at them high-falutin' (fancy, refined) universities... to everyone else, the correct pronunciation is "Loo-zee-anna"... adding a soft, falling "r" to the very end is also acceptable (e.g. "Loo-zee-anner") But even though there are two syllabic "i"s in the spelling, you would never know it by the most common pronunciation. In some parts of Western Louisiana, it is contracted even further, into a two-syllable word-- "Loo-zanner".

As far as classic Southern phrases,

"Well bless his (her) heart"-- which is very rarely an actual blessing, but more often a backhanded passive-aggressive form of pity or mild disdain.

cattywampus-- meaning something askew, crooked or off-kilter. It can refer to a tangible or intangible object, item, or situation.

Most important of all--

"Damn Yankee" is NOT the correct spelling. In the south it is pronounce as ONE three-syllable word---- "damyankee". This refers to just about ANY American who is not of Southern birth, regardless of whether they are from California, New York, or Iowa, or even Alaska, but especially if they are from any state which fought on the side of the Union in 1863.

37

One of my most memorable southern expressions (heard in South Carolina, by the way), was "I ain't workin' on no mother f'n Yankee car!"

Spoken by a guy who then turned & strode quickly back into his place of employment (after spotting a New York license plate on said vehicle).

Bless his heart.

38

Ha! I've been called "y'all" in the south before - made me look around to see who else was there.

"Ain't" is a very interesting word. It actually predates US colonisation and is very common in the west country of the UK. It is also used as "bain't" in the UK, although that use is not so common these days. These words are flagged as slang but I feel they were more dialect than slang. I've heard "in't" in some parts of the UK. And in London it's not uncommon to hear "innit?" for "isn't it?" used very inappropriately, as in "You brought too much stuff, innit?"

Language is so interesting!

39

In many areas of Louisiana, "There" is pronounced as "dare" with a much softer "D"; except in the classic New Orleans vernacular, where it is more often pronounced as "They-ah".

The New Orleans accent is a weird one. I worked with a guy whose accent I thought was definitely northeastern. I couldn't place it (and don't know squat about NE accents beyond what I see on TV and in movies), but I was sure it had to be New England. Nope. Born and raised in New Orleans. It really doesn't sound anything like other Southern accents to my ears. I think I could fairly easily pick it out now, but at the time I had never been to New Orleans and was new to Texas.

40

Yankee is any Northerner.

Damn Yankee is one who moves in.

One of the hardest parts of learning any language is picking up the contractions, the odd phrases, the regional terms.

41

"Y'all" is also used as a singular in many, many parts of the South.

Yes, you may address a single person as "y'all." It's more common than you think.

"You'uns" or "You'ens" is also used as singular or plural, but it's mostly used in some pockets along the Cumberland Plateau and in some areas of Appalachia-- not very widely used elsewhere, although it can be found here and there.

Also, Southern colloquial vernacular, regardless of dialect often involves double negative or unnecessarily reinforced negative action... for example:

"Billy Joe's been down in his back for a week-- it's got to where he can't hardly walk..."

in this case, "can't hardly" (a contraction of "cannot hardly") is an unnecessary reinforced statement in the negative-- which means that Billy Joe is having a difficult time walking. This sort of reinforcement is very, very common across the entire Deep South-- "Ain't never", "Can't hardly", "Couldn't hardly", "Shouldn't Ought'a", etc.

"Ain't" is interesting in itself-- while not purely Southern, technically, it is supposed to be a contraction of "am not". However, in the South it is also used interchangeably as a substitute contraction of "is not" and "are not".

"There" is another interesting word-- often pronounced without the "th" at all, particularly when ending a sentence-- in this case "there is pronounced very similar to "air":

"Hey mama, Jimmy's sittin' at the drugstore right over 'ere."

in fact, in this case, "over 'ere" is usually condensed into one syllabic stream- sounding more like "ov'ere".

In many areas of Louisiana, "There" is pronounced as "dare" with a much softer "D"; except in the classic New Orleans vernacular, where it is more often pronounced as "They-ah".

Also, In the entire state of Louisiana, there are probably less than 100 people who actually pronounce the state's name correctly in the phonetic sense (Loo-wee-zee-ana)... most of them are either transplanted Yankees or high-brow professors at them high-falutin' (fancy, refined) universities... to everyone else, the correct pronunciation is "Loo-zee-anna"... adding a soft, falling "r" to the very end is also acceptable (e.g. "Loo-zee-anner") But even though there are two syllabic "i"s in the spelling, you would never know it by the most common pronunciation. In some parts of Western Louisiana, it is contracted even further, into a two-syllable word-- "Loo-zanner".

As far as classic Southern phrases,

"Well bless his (her) heart"-- which is very rarely an actual blessing, but more often a backhanded passive-aggressive form of pity or mild disdain.

cattywampus-- meaning something askew, crooked or off-kilter. It can refer to a tangible or intangible object, item, or situation.

Most important of all--

"Damn Yankee" is NOT the correct spelling. In the south it is pronounce as ONE three-syllable word---- "damyankee". This refers to just about ANY American who is not of Southern birth, regardless of whether they are from California, New York, or Iowa, or even Alaska, but especially if they are from any state which fought on the side of the Union in 1863.

– Tartan Phantom

ahhhh eeeee you told dem son !

Louisiana was named for the King of France at the time. so, it translates in English to "Land of Louis". in French, you would say "Louie Anna". Cajun French, they Luz(Looz) e ann.

42

Way back when my wife and I were in New Orleans we caught a cab in the rain to get to the glamourous Greyhound station - we were young backpackers. The cab driver, a lovely, friendly local man who sounded like he had a mouth full of chewing tobacco and a blocked nose, would not stop talking the whole time. And we could not understand a word of it until we were just about to get out when he said "Yo' bess frenn's yo' taxi drahvah!"

That was 29 years ago and I remember it like it was yesterday.

43

I'm from the South, South Wales in the UK, so you need to add a drawn out arrr, like car but longer, you'll be sorted.

44

A friend of mine is from Bristol. He has that classic Bristol growl. Sounds like a pirate. He's an architect, and I never tire of hearing him say (growl) "Harrdcorre moderrnist arrchtitecturrrre"!

45

Isn't it Sitch-e-ated for situated in the south and Pert-near for pretty near? That's how I've always heerd it?

46

Isn't it Sitch-e-ated for situated in the south and Pert-near for pretty near? That's how I've always heerd it?

– Suprdave

Yeah, that's in the South---- South Indiana...

47

That's how we hoosiers roll, doncha know?

48

That's how we hoosiers roll, doncha know?

– Suprdave

And you end every sentence with "eh?" as well...

no wait, I'm confusing hoosiers with hosers....

49

Hawaii has an odd accent when the proper kings English is spoken. It's a mixture of Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, all of the races that call this place home.

Most all words are tinged with a certain accent that is hard to pinpoint, add in Pidgen and it's kind of mumbly English. I'm sure they think I'm completely from the Sticks with my still strong Texas accent, but I can hear that Asian and Hawaiian tinged accent and would know it anywhere now.

50

And you end every sentence with "eh?" as well...

no wait, I'm confusing hoosiers with hosers....

– Tartan Phantom

Hoosier is the French Candadian pronunciation of hoser, I think. Anything south of I-80 is Southern Indiana. The accents get thicker the farther south you go. Suprdave might as well be in Louisiana. Most of Indiana was settled from the South to the north in the early 1800s, except for the Northern part which was settled by the French in the 1680s. Top ten miles used to be part of Michigan---we ain't Hoosiers.

Instead of "you" proper, a lot of people use "ya"--- as in, "How ya doin'?
The closer to Chicago you get, "the" becomes "da"---da Cubs--- or, just a "t" as in wit' instead of "with".


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