Miscellaneous Rumbles

My Kenya Trip

1

A while back, someone asked me about my trip to Kenya back in 2007. I'll share a few of my own pics here. I don't want to bore you, so I won't go on and on with it. You'll be able to tell right off that I'm not a professional photographer.

The Kenyans are lovely people. I enjoyed my brief visit with them so very much.

Here we go.

My dear friend, Herbert Davis, who is a preacher man, and I were out on a walkabout one morning and ran into these 2 gentlemen, and had a wonderful conversation, even though it was difficult at times because of the language barrier.

2

I will never forget this man and his family. Charles Mwisi. Every morning he would greet me with "there is my good friend."

Charles took me on a little walk, which was about 200, maybe 300 meters. Actually it turned out to be about 2 miles - one way. It was just Charles and I when we started, but as we walked back through the bush we attracted more participants. Remember, a white man is something very unusual for the Kenyans to see in person.

3

Forgive me. I don't know how to add more than one photo to a post. This is actually the portrait of Charles Mwisi and his family.

4

Kenya is on the northern part of the Serengeti. Such a beautiful place. Seemingly millions of acres with innumerable Kichwa trees.

5

Future King(s) of the Jungle.

EDIT to say that you haven't lived until you hear a Male lion roar late at night (for real).

6

This was one of the most fascinating scenes for me. The fastest animal on earth. She was just taking her good old easy time trying to choose what would be for supper.

EDIT: There were hundreds of a wide variety of animals within about a half mile range of her when I snapped this shot. I can assure you, every eye was on her, and not a one moved a muscle until they could see what her intentions were.

7

Thanks Richard for posting these. Fantastic trip and photos. Not boring in the least. You are our good friend also.

8

We had fun also. Here I am in all of my sunburnt glory, trying to teach the chef a trick or two.

EDIT: Yeah, it was a bad hair day.

10

The Maasi even paid us a visit.

EDIT: I wish I could have captured the demonstration the warriors put on for us. The Maasi are very tall and slender people. When they dance, they jump straight up in the air to unbelievable heights. You can't see their knees bend at all as they spring back up.

11

One warrior ventured out by himself before nightfall to visit with my friend, Rev Davis, and another fellow whose name escapes me at the moment.

12

Of course, there is always time for a guitar picker to get some rest, don'tchaknow.

13

This is great, Richard.

Thanks for sharing.

14

Must have been an interesting trip.

15

Of course, there is always time for a guitar picker to get some rest, don'tchaknow.

– Richard Hudson

Now that shot of you just makes my day, Richard! Today was hot and a bit humid and no one felt like working. Thankfully there was a nice breeze blowing through the fabrication shop to make it bearable. You had the right idea.

16

Fascinating post, Richard. You have done something that's on my bucket list! Thank you for sharing your story with us.

17

Is this the same trip where you shot an elephant in your pajamas?

18

Thank you for sharing this. I bet the Kenyan friends you made still miss you as much as you miss them.

19

Is this the same trip where you shot an elephant in your pajamas?

– NJBob

Now, that's how rumors get started.

I did see elephants 2 or 3 different times, and one time they weren't so happy to see us. I don't think that's an animal you would want to argue with.

20

Buddy, I honestly do think about those folks very often, especially Charles Mwisi. There was also a district superintendent named Moses Muthee that gained my favor also. Moses was a man of authority, and it showed. You knew he was the man in charge the minute he walked in the room. Lovely man.

I played guitar for them, of course, while I was there. I felt like a pied piper with the little kids. Many of them had never seen a white person before, and it was fascinating to them. I could tell they were looking at me like I was different. They would rub the hair on my arms, and feel my hair, and feel my skin. When we would drive on the highway, there was always a line of people on both sides of the road walking to where ever they were going. Many of them were running. No wonder they always do well in the Olympics.

I'm getting lonesome to go back just reminiscing here with you guys. The sights and sounds of Africa are like no other place on Earth, but it's the lovely people that win your heart.

21

Looks like you had a blast. All of the people from Africa that I've ever met stateside, were the nicest people I've ever met. Always very kind and mannerly.

I'll bet that was a real treat, seeing the Maasi dance.

22

The Maasi even invited us over to their village the day after the dance. It's amazing how they manage to live so well under very primitive conditions.

According to Maasi legend, all of the cattle all over the world belong to the Maasi, so whenever they need another, they just go get it. Belongs to them anyway. One of the men in my party, Jim, was a cattleman from western Oklahoma. He got into a conversation with one of the Maasi warriors that night. The Maasi asked Jim how many cattle he had. Jim gave him a number. It was something like 600 as I remember. The Maasi in as straight a voice as you ever heard looked him straight in the eye and said, "They are all ours." Jim never hesitated, "Well, I'll tell you one thing, if you ever decide to come get your cattle, I'll even help you load 'em." The Maasi smiled and stuck out his hand, and went on about his business.

23

Great pics and great stories! Sounds like a fantastic adventure. I’d love to go visit someday.

24

Thanks for posting. More pictures and recollections very welcome.

25

Now, that's how rumors get started.

I did see elephants 2 or 3 different times, and one time they weren't so happy to see us. I don't think that's an animal you would want to argue with.

– Richard Hudson

Groucho Elephant shoot


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