Miscellaneous Rumbles

my future place to record and play guitar in the attic of my old ho…

1

Some friends have start the job yesterday. I hope to use it at the end of this year.

2

Neat! Share pic's when it's done.

3

Wow! Where exactly do you live, Didier? I don't mean your street address - city or town is fine. Where I live we don't have attics. Even if we did have enough room to use roof space (we don't) it would be too hot to spend any time there.

The architecture looks interesting. How old is your house?

4

I love old buildings! Keep us posted with more pictures, Didier!

5

Yes, please post pictures showing the construction progress!

Your home must have multiple fireplaces. Be sure to include a trapdoor or two, so you can still get to the clean-outs on those interesting chimneys.

6

Wow! Where exactly do you live, Didier? I don't mean your street address - city or town is fine. Where I live we don't have attics. Even if we did have enough room to use roof space (we don't) it would be too hot to spend any time there.

The architecture looks interesting. How old is your house?

– JimmyR

the house was build before the first world war. Beginning of the 20 th century. In Picardy.

7

Yes, please post pictures showing the construction progress!

Your home must have multiple fireplaces. Be sure to include a trapdoor or two, so you can still get to the clean-outs on those interesting chimneys.

– geoguy

the chimneys didn't work. And i hate Mary Poppins.

9

That's the real deal right there. Here we have "faux" versions of that. A beautiful house can be an inspiring place to live. As long as it has indoor toilets.

10

That is lovely, and inspiring. Best of luck.

12

Very elegant house, Didier. A lovely place to live.

13

Very elegant house, Didier. A lovely place to live.

– Dave_K

thanks

15

Very nice! I had a mouse in my attic last night. I was doing fine until my wife woke me up to say "do you hear that?" I put a treat out for him today.

17

Did you insulate, Didier? How about extra electric circuitry? Looks like you've made lots of progress already! Drywall, tape and mud is the dirtiest part of the process.

18

I think I spy insulation behind that dry wall! FWIW the term dry wall confused me for ages - we would hear it used on US tv shows and wonder what on earth was "dry-wall"?? Here it's called plasterboard or Gyprock. Gyprock is of course a tradename but used widely.

Once I visited the local Gyprock factory to take photos for a trade magazine. It's a simple process but takes up a lot of room and timing is critical. There are two massive rolls of brown paper, one for each side of the board. One roll goes under the plaster and one os laid on top, while the plaster is constantly mixed in massive vats and pumped into a layer between the papers. Once started the machine can't be stopped or else it gets jammed with setting plaster. It takes a long time to clean up then get it started again.

So why didn't they warn me about the string line which ran alongside the conveyor belt rolling setting board past where I had my tripod set up? Just as we packed up to leave lots of sirens and lights went on. Apparently my tripod had snagged the emergency stop cable. So we left rather hurriedly while lots of people ran around to fix the machine. I heard later that it took two hours to get everything running again.

19

I think I spy insulation behind that dry wall! FWIW the term dry wall confused me for ages - we would hear it used on US tv shows and wonder what on earth was "dry-wall"?? Here it's called plasterboard or Gyprock. Gyprock is of course a tradename but used widely.

Once I visited the local Gyprock factory to take photos for a trade magazine. It's a simple process but takes up a lot of room and timing is critical. There are two massive rolls of brown paper, one for each side of the board. One roll goes under the plaster and one os laid on top, while the plaster is constantly mixed in massive vats and pumped into a layer between the papers. Once started the machine can't be stopped or else it gets jammed with setting plaster. It takes a long time to clean up then get it started again.

So why didn't they warn me about the string line which ran alongside the conveyor belt rolling setting board past where I had my tripod set up? Just as we packed up to leave lots of sirens and lights went on. Apparently my tripod had snagged the emergency stop cable. So we left rather hurriedly while lots of people ran around to fix the machine. I heard later that it took two hours to get everything running again.

– JimmyR

oops...

20

Did you insulate, Didier? How about extra electric circuitry? Looks like you've made lots of progress already! Drywall, tape and mud is the dirtiest part of the process.

– wabash slim

when we have buy the house (15 years ago) there was no electricity, sorry the electricity was present but with a pre second war circuit. All was changed and we have put an Electric circuit in wait in the attic.

21

My house is the first one.

22

Did you insulate, Didier? How about extra electric circuitry? Looks like you've made lots of progress already! Drywall, tape and mud is the dirtiest part of the process.

– wabash slim

i didn't work myself in the attic, due of my poor back. I just use credit card and check book.

23

I love that French parking! Only in France...

24

I think I spy insulation behind that dry wall! FWIW the term dry wall confused me for ages - we would hear it used on US tv shows and wonder what on earth was "dry-wall"?? Here it's called plasterboard or Gyprock. Gyprock is of course a tradename but used widely.

Once I visited the local Gyprock factory to take photos for a trade magazine. It's a simple process but takes up a lot of room and timing is critical. There are two massive rolls of brown paper, one for each side of the board. One roll goes under the plaster and one os laid on top, while the plaster is constantly mixed in massive vats and pumped into a layer between the papers. Once started the machine can't be stopped or else it gets jammed with setting plaster. It takes a long time to clean up then get it started again.

So why didn't they warn me about the string line which ran alongside the conveyor belt rolling setting board past where I had my tripod set up? Just as we packed up to leave lots of sirens and lights went on. Apparently my tripod had snagged the emergency stop cable. So we left rather hurriedly while lots of people ran around to fix the machine. I heard later that it took two hours to get everything running again.

– JimmyR

Yeah, we hated guys like you. A couple hours in the plant and you shut us down and think you know everything about wallboard manufacturing. 33 years under my belt before retiring, it is anything but a simple process. Seriously? You need someone to warn you about an emergency stop cable?

25

When did I say I knew all about gyprock manufacturing? Obviously I didn't! And sure, how the hell was I to know what that string was for? They saw me setting up there, chatted with me about the angle, saying that it showed the process well - not one word (which is all it would have taken) to say "watch out for the cord". No labels, no colour coding, nothing to suggest what it was. If I was in a machine shop I would know not to press the big red button!

I completely understand if they didn't like me after that but they only have themselves to blame. If someone comes into my workplace I always point out the things which might hurt them or mess up my studio.


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