Miscellaneous Rumbles

Model railroading

1

In another thread I saw some interest in model railroading. Thought I would throw this out there. This keeps jumping track and where do I get the smoke pellets.

4

The Smoke products I'm familiar with are liquid, at least for "O" Scale. We used MTH.

https://www.google.com/sear...

One of my good family relations deeds was building out a large set for my Father-in-Law when he Retired.

5

When I was young (long time ago) we had Lionel trains with smoke tablets, not liquid.I believe we used baking soda when we had no tablets.Yours are not Lionel, so I would look deeper into it before throwing baking soda in there,as it was over 50 yrs ago and I could be off base.

7

I love the smell of a warm Lionel transformer; it smells like Christmas.

8

I liked it when I shorted the output wires and got that acrid scent.

9

I was given a Hornby Dublo set for Christmas 1950 -- two weeks short of my fifth birthday. I've never lost my interest in trains, full size or models. The Hornby transformer had two fuses. If one of them blew (not uncommon) I'd just wrap a bit of silver foil from a bar of chocolate round them. That sorted it out -- and revealed my keen interest in electronics that has remained with me until this day!

10

You can get anything electronic to smoke---once.

11

I remember putting in the pellets, the fun was doubled when it was puffing for some reason. My Lionel used run off the track a lot too. The engineer was always going into the turns WOT. Still got that set in it's boxes. Can't believe that was almost 70 years ago when I got that gift. It was quite an extravagant one for our home at the time. My Mom and Dad were grinning as much as I was when I unwrapped it.

12

When I was about 6 years old (1960) I got a train set that was set up in the basement on a sheet of 4 x 8 plywood that was nicely painted and had a tunnel. I was probably I little young to play with it. I suspect my father was the one that really wanted it. He probably played with it more than I did. He grew up around trains as his father was an engineer for the CPR until his death in 1944. He was the engineer on the Royal Hudson that brought King George and his wife into Vancouver BC in 1939.

15

I've got a Fleischmann HO train purchased about 1963 while we were living in Germany. Have not set it up in years and really need to get rid of it. Grandson not interested in it as he's too old and cool, now.

16

I wish I had the space for it. Model railroading is a never-ending hobby. It's easy to sink a lot of cash into it as well. As a kid I had a Lionel / CSSSB "South Shore" Box cab electric freight loco. Pretty rare, but it was our hometown line. My Dad had fun with it, too. We lived a quarter mile from three busy tracks---NYC, Grand Trunk, and the South Shore. It got to where I couldn't sleep unless I heard them roaring by.

Purdue's oldest student club is the model railroad group housed in the basement of the Student Union. It's been around for well over 80 years. Seems appropriate since the school's mascot is a steam engine.

17

I used to have a model train set, I loved it. For the past couple years slot cars have been my thing, I’m about to expand my track to be pretty large and twisty.

18

I used to have a model train set, I loved it. For the past couple years slot cars have been my thing, I’m about to expand my track to be pretty large and twisty.

– Chmason85

Funny you should bring this up...I considered taking a tangent and asking if anyone is into slot cars. I have a young grand-daughter and grand-son, and I was thinking that there might be a time soon when they would enjoy it...and, that way, I could get into it, too!

Any recommendations on what to look for "brand" wise? The only "brand name" I remember from my youth is COX...who made the best affordable hand controller.

19

When I was in grade school I had a decent amount of Tri-ang HO rolling stock on a board (actually a household door) that was hinged to the wall to be out of the way when not in use (or when my little brother had to sleep in the bed the board was above!)

I had CN and CPR diesels, a set of 4 dome cars and several freight cars of various sorts, including a car carrier that my Matchbox cars actually fit on (not well, as I recall). Every month, Dad would bring home a couple of little bits for the diorama; a new bit of rolling stock, some tiny trees, or a building of some sort. It was one of the very few areas where he and I actually got along, and as I recall, it was beginning to get reasonably elaborate for a brief time.

But about my 10th birthday, I discovered plastic models of WW2 aircraft and ships, and the trains were sidelined. After a few years, the board departed the wall in favor of shelves for the model boxes and now, more than 50 years later, I have no idea what happened to the rolling stock.

Tastes can change. Now, if I had space in the new townhouse, I'd probably have myself another train board, but the only space I have for it is currently my music room..

20

The factory where I work now is right next to the BNSF yard, and though I can't drive 'em, they haven't gone off the track yet (fortunately), so I never have to clean up the mess. This is the view out my office window:

A friend who owns a Toledo-based guitar company said "if that were my office view, I'd never get any work done." And I have to agree, watching the various assortment of freight cars get assembled and rolled out is fascinating, as is the graffiti that adorns some of the cars. And when they couple the cars together near our building, the resulting "boom" from the impact makes the floor shake. When an engine or two (or three or four, coupled together) goes by on the closest track, it's like pulling up next to a lowrider with a giant subwoofer at a stoplight. Only louder.

The downside of working in an industrial area is riding my bike to work and having to vault all the railroad tracks (at one intersection alone there are 4 tracks), both active and abandoned. I'm going to have to count them someday and see how many I have to traverse.

21

Funny you should bring this up...I considered taking a tangent and asking if anyone is into slot cars. I have a young grand-daughter and grand-son, and I was thinking that there might be a time soon when they would enjoy it...and, that way, I could get into it, too!

Any recommendations on what to look for "brand" wise? The only "brand name" I remember from my youth is COX...who made the best affordable hand controller.

– Toddfan

I have a Carrera analog track, they are top of the line and the nice thing is that they are more realistic having a wide track that you can run 1/32 and 1/24 scale cars on. All of my cars are 1/32, there is way more stuff available for them! So far I have gotten all of my stuff from LEB Hobbies in Yardley, PA. They have a great selection and some of the better pricing.

22

My ex & son had an elaborate N gauge railroad setup in a quarter of our basement. It was elegant, even down to tiny grasses.

I am not familiar with slot cars. Drew had Darda cars--exciting little flyers with intricate tracks. Delightful to watch & Drew & Friends were lost in them for hours. They're around here somewhere, I'm sure. Nice memory.

23

The factory where I work now is right next to the BNSF yard, and though I can't drive 'em, they haven't gone off the track yet (fortunately), so I never have to clean up the mess. This is the view out my office window:

A friend who owns a Toledo-based guitar company said "if that were my office view, I'd never get any work done." And I have to agree, watching the various assortment of freight cars get assembled and rolled out is fascinating, as is the graffiti that adorns some of the cars. And when they couple the cars together near our building, the resulting "boom" from the impact makes the floor shake. When an engine or two (or three or four, coupled together) goes by on the closest track, it's like pulling up next to a lowrider with a giant subwoofer at a stoplight. Only louder.

The downside of working in an industrial area is riding my bike to work and having to vault all the railroad tracks (at one intersection alone there are 4 tracks), both active and abandoned. I'm going to have to count them someday and see how many I have to traverse.

– giffenf

We live in a new great/bad house.

Got a basement for my HO layout if I can brave the cold down there to find the boxes and maybe get started. It was even cold down there last summer so I'm over a year late in getting started.

The back yard is also cool, as in, that's cool.

If ya park a little too far off the driveway, ya fall onto the tracks. About 10 ft down onto the tracks. Bummer. (bounce over the tracks and end up 15 ft. down into the river.) Park carefully.

Single track, 'bout three to four trains a day, 'bout 20 cars each with usually a GP38 and GP40 up front or often two GP40s. Little rise in the track just north of us and depending on the load, a pretty good blip of the throttles gets my attention and pulls me outta my chair to put new nose prints on the Kitchen window.

I get good exercise in the summer when the windows are open! I can only see the tops of the engines and taller cars from the ground floor, but if I hear the crossing signal and have enough time, I can run up to the 2nd or 3rd floor for a better look!


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