Miscellaneous Rumbles

Maybe I’m over Lyme disease…

1

I posted this on facebook, but I should probably post this here...

...

I was going to post this, then I wasn't, then I was, but here goes. Some of my friends know that for most of this year (if not a lot longer) I've been battling Lyme disease. I think that after this last eight-week mega round of antibiotics that I'm finally over it. It's been about 10 days and the crazy joint pain is mostly gone; the headaches are gone; the nodes are down; my eyes are getting back to normal; the exhaustion is mostly gone, etc. I don't feel quite right yet, but again I think it's gone (and after I guess a total of five months of heavy antibiotics, it may take a bit to feel "right.")

The funny (or not so funny) thing is that the doc thinks I may have had it for years but only really succumbed to it (in a big way) this winter. It probably made this one of the most difficult years ever, but... here is the thing: in the meantime found out that some 30 percent of Poles are suffering from this. Some don't know they are even sick. Others end up like I was--seriously unable to function and still others wind up on IV drips in the hospital, which is what was next on the schedule for me. I actually personally know people that have been stuck in hospitals over and over again for one month at a time on an IV antibiotic drip--so I guess mine was not that bad. But the real prob is that most of us can't afford anything of the kind, and no matter how bad we feel we still have to get up and go to work every day.

Which is no fun at all.

I'll put it this way: this was so severe (the pain factor was sometimes outrageous) that now I'm actually thinking maybe I should start a foundation or a support group--something of that nature. At any rate, if you think you have it or are dealing with it and want advice, hit me on face or give me a call. Apart from antibiotics, I used about every strategy out there to various effect. A footnote to this actually is that my ruptured achilles is also getting better--I think I'm going to avoid surgery so there is a lot be thankful for going into the fall.

And if you are young, Lyme and injury free, God bless you and back to your regularly scheduled stations.

K

2

Congrats . . . one of my wife's close friends recovered from Lyme after not knowing why she had tremendous joint pain & overall malaise for a couple of years. She's doing fine now, and I hope that you will, too.

3

Geo, Compared to how I felt even just a month ago, I feel like a millions dollars now. But when it was bad it was crazy bad.

I would not wish it on anyone.

K

4

Glad you are feeling better

6

I posted this on facebook, but I should probably post this here...

...

I was going to post this, then I wasn't, then I was, but here goes. Some of my friends know that for most of this year (if not a lot longer) I've been battling Lyme disease. I think that after this last eight-week mega round of antibiotics that I'm finally over it. It's been about 10 days and the crazy joint pain is mostly gone; the headaches are gone; the nodes are down; my eyes are getting back to normal; the exhaustion is mostly gone, etc. I don't feel quite right yet, but again I think it's gone (and after I guess a total of five months of heavy antibiotics, it may take a bit to feel "right.")

The funny (or not so funny) thing is that the doc thinks I may have had it for years but only really succumbed to it (in a big way) this winter. It probably made this one of the most difficult years ever, but... here is the thing: in the meantime found out that some 30 percent of Poles are suffering from this. Some don't know they are even sick. Others end up like I was--seriously unable to function and still others wind up on IV drips in the hospital, which is what was next on the schedule for me. I actually personally know people that have been stuck in hospitals over and over again for one month at a time on an IV antibiotic drip--so I guess mine was not that bad. But the real prob is that most of us can't afford anything of the kind, and no matter how bad we feel we still have to get up and go to work every day.

Which is no fun at all.

I'll put it this way: this was so severe (the pain factor was sometimes outrageous) that now I'm actually thinking maybe I should start a foundation or a support group--something of that nature. At any rate, if you think you have it or are dealing with it and want advice, hit me on face or give me a call. Apart from antibiotics, I used about every strategy out there to various effect. A footnote to this actually is that my ruptured achilles is also getting better--I think I'm going to avoid surgery so there is a lot be thankful for going into the fall.

And if you are young, Lyme and injury free, God bless you and back to your regularly scheduled stations.

K

– Konrad

Yes and Yes... #1 you have this experience #2 you can offer hope to others #3 youre an amazing writer #4 you are called

ps. post antibiotic treatment Supplements to Aid Liver Function

1) Vitamins C, E & B

All essential vitamins and minerals support liver health, but these three in particular are standouts when it comes to detox. Vitamins C and E are strong antioxidants and help neutralize free radicals to reverse oxidative stress in the liver. It is suspected that Vitamin E can help rebuild damaged liver cells. The B vitamins help the liver break down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates for easier digestion. Like vitamin E, B12 also aids in liver regeneration. You can get these vitamins from food or supplements, but if you’re using only food sources make sure your dosing is sufficient.

2)Milk Thistle

The active ingredient in this flowering herb is silymarin, a potent flavonoid with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Perhaps the best-known liver supplement on the market, the benefits of milk thistle were enough to make the mainstream medical community take notice. This has led to significant research surrounding milk thistle and the liver. Studies show varied results, but a recent paper showed silymarin reduced inflammatory cytokines and protected the liver from damage in mice. It also has regenerative properties.

3)Dandelion Root

Dandelion root is a natural diuretic and laxative, which means it helps move fluids and waste through the body. The more we urinate and move our bowels, the more we rid our bodies of toxins. This decreases the liver’s burden. The root of the dandelion is also believed to help clean the liver and gallbladder of toxins. This supplement often comes in a detox tea but can also be taken in a capsule.

4) Burpleurum

This herb, used in traditional Chinese medicine, is an anti-viral. Common latent viruses, such as herpes and Epstein- Barr (EBV) are very taxing to the liver and this herb may help to reduce our viral load. Like other potent herbs, it also aids in detoxification. Studies suggest that it may even help to prevent liver cancer in those with cirrhosis. Because this herb is so powerful, it’s best to check with your health care provider before starting a regimen.

5) Schisandra

The medicinal part of the schisandra plant is the bright red berry. The schisandra berry aids in the production of glutathione by stimulating liver enzymes. Glutathione is perhaps the most powerful antioxidant in the body, thus reducing free radicals and cleansing the blood.

6) Chlorella

Chlorella is a single-celled algae that is a detoxifying powerhouse. In the digestive tract, chlorella binds to heavy metals and other toxins and carries them out of the body. Unlike other binders, such as activated charcoal and bentonite clay, it doesn’t also remove healthy minerals from the body. Chlorella has the added benefit of supporting the immune system.

7) Artichoke

Artichokes are related to the milk thistle plant, so it’s no wonder it also benefits the liver. Artichokes contain cynarin, a phytonutrient that increases the production of bile to promote digestion. As the body digests, it carries toxins out of the body. Artichoke also has been found in studies to have antimicrobial properties, warding off bacteria, fungus, and mold, which tax the liver.

8) Phosphatidylcholine

Every single cell has phosphatidylcholine in the membrane. As we age, the level of phosphatidylcholine decreases and is associated with liver damage and also some brain conditions. Studies have shown replacing phosphatidylcholine through supplementation improves liver enzymes and decrease symptoms in those with hepatitis, fatty liver disease, and liver damage from alcohol abuse. Even those without a serious liver disorder will see benefits from phosphatidylcholine.

9) Turmeric Extract

This spice known for its anti-inflammatory properties is one of the best things you can take for your liver. The active ingredient, curcumin, prevents the build-up of toxins in the body. Taking a turmeric is usually safe, which makes it a great option for those who can’t take other anti-inflammatory medications.

Many liver supplements on the market use blend of these key ingredients, so check labels to avoid overlap. Talk to your doctor about which liver supplements best fit your needs during Lyme disease treatment. Support your liver today and feel better tomorrow."

7

Tavo,

That's an awesome list. I'm already down with the vitamins and milk thistle--but I'm going to borrow a this list for others if you don't mind!

K

8

A word of caution to anyone considering self mega dosing supplements/vitamins/minerals/herbs/extracts etc. "A little of something that may be good for you" doesnt always translate to "taking a lot is better". I had to rush my wife to the ER twice for over dosing on natural healing concoctions.


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