Miscellaneous Rumbles

Larry King has left the building

1

We’ve lost another icon. Began his broadcasting career in 1957. He was never my cup of tea, but he was a respectable guy, a snappy dresser and sure had staying power.

TWA

2

I read where he did more than 50,000 interviews. RIP

3

Oh man! An icon, very sad news. I enjoyed his interviews very much. RIP Larry King.

4

Another Icon gone. RIP Sir.

5

About 10 years ago he was interviewing Paul McCartney, asking ' at your age, why do you even still do this' .. not realizing he was just inviting Paul to turn the question on him... who replied " the same reasons you still do what you do at your age now'.

He was good at getting good answers from his interview guests.

6

He sat in for Craig Ferguson's sidekick, Geoff Peterson, on his Late Late Show. Had a great sense of humor.

7

This is not going to be the best of years -again.

RIP Mr. K

8

Time for an obituary section.

9

i happened upon Larry King by accident, before he was famous. when i lived in Spokane, WA in 1979-81 i used to amuse myself by "DXing," which is to say listening to far-off AM radio stations at night when there's less interference from solar radiation. i could pick up KGO in SF quite well in the middle of the night.

that was when Larry was just starting to work on the national level. the original Larry King Show on the Mutual Broadcast System was America's first coast-to-coast call-in show. he literally invented that...that's where the idiom "long time listener, first time caller" came from. in his radio days he was looser, funnier, and startlingly eclectic. he once interviewed Anthony Burgess of A Clockwork Orange fame, and i made Strom Thurmond apologize to the nation one night for saying all food stamp recipients were lazy. it was wide open. he was never as compelling to me as a TV interviewer; his voice--rasping from three packs of cigarettes a day--over the airwaves in the small hours of the morning was a magical thing. and on radio he was never dull; TV imposed a formality on his interviews that killed a lot of the spark. i've missed that show for decades now. it's really weird to have lived through the entire careers of legends and pioneers in their fields. i read today that the darling baby daughter Chaia he doted over on his show in 1980 passed away before he did. the world seems a wee bit smaller without his insatiable curiosity. RIP.


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