Miscellaneous Rumbles

Just heard that St. Elmo’s Fire song and remembered how bad music i…

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Hey, I mentioned them! I get credit!

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my innards clammered for fatter, ever fatter snare sounds.

Then how could you have resisted Mellenhed's "Hurts So Good" snare? Or Alan White's on the "Big Generator" album? (No, scratch that; you wouldn't listen to that album.)

Here, I sampled it for these songs (appropriately enough, recorded in 1988):
Nothing Matters
You Never Let Me

(And did you program those drum tracks, or did I?)


But you know, now that you menching it, the Quest for the Big Snare (and Ever Bigger Drums) could be accused of having gradually overtaken the musical value of 80s (and early 90s) rock. At the time, I (thought I) loved it too.

It was kind of a revelation to hear all that stürm und drang upfront and larger-than-life, made the music of that era superficially sound so much BIGGER and MORE POWERFUL than pitiful old 60s and 70s drums, recorded like there was just a human-sized drummer with a human-sized kit in a human-sized room with humans. (I mean, even the Dan's 70s drums can sound clinical.) Maybe the distant thunder of "When the Levee Breaks" had broken the dam and loosed the flood of DRUMPOWER, putting sinners in the hands of angry drummers. I'm sure you - Tubsam - recall our Headley Grange experiment, with your kit at the far end of a 60 ft suite of empty rooms and mics at the other end, filling ALL 8 TRACKS of the 80-8, doing the drums for that project with Theado.

But listening in retrospect now, there's an awful lot of 80s-90s recordings on which the drums simply ate the rest of the mix.

So here's your damn BRUSHES, now settle down and be civilized. Barbarian.

– Proteus

The snare on the first one sounded like our Headley Grange one. And nossir, t’weren’t I whom did the programming.

Regarding Big Generator: I DID listen to it and liked it. Now see, the title cut had more of a wound up, “Owner...Lonely Heart” snare. But then you had Leave It, which had a fatter snare. (But then, the drums were programmed on that one.) Or was Leave It on 90125?

Mutt Lange was the pinnacle of the “9-foot deep snare o’ death”. When Back In Black came out, I was amazed and thought there’ll never be a fatter snare mix than that. And then the Def Leppard stuff started coming out....I was WRONG!!! And you’re right, the snare mix on Mellenhead’s “American Fool” album was viciously meaty. I just couldn’t get past the songs though. Not my cuppa darjeeling. (And then on his subsequent album, the snare made a 180 from “...Fool”. Another cranked up tight farcracka.)

Speaking of Yes and his snare from that era, I recently read an interview with Trevor Horn where he talked about the snare on 90125. I guess there was some consternation about it. Horn said he heard White’s tech tell White that Horn had his snare “sounding like he was dropping a bag of peas”. Rabin had just come off a project with the aforementioned Mutt Lange and he pitched a bitch about White’s snare, to the point to where, in Horn’s words, “There’s a mix out there of “Lonely Heart” with the snare pitched down about a fourth, but -I- didn’t do it.”

And hey, remember when we ran the snare on your old Sequential Circuits drum machine through an octave pedal? Yeah baby!

Also quickly, regarding 80’s music, I have to give props to Elliot Easton for some of that decade’s most memorable guitar solos, in my world.

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I recently read an interview with Trevor Horn where he talked about the snare on 90125. I guess there was some consternation about it. Horn said he heard White’s tech tell White that Horn had his snare “sounding like he was dropping a bag of peas”.

Now that's funny. Surely you remember when White was the Ludwig guest drummer with the LHS Percussion Ensemble yearly indoor fahrwerks extravaganza. I was tapped to mix house sound, and record the event.

All goo-goo and ga-ga, I asked White how they got that snare sound on the album, and he dismissively said "someone else tuned'em. I just played."

And we were going for a bag of rocks electro-snare, I recall. Kinda got it on this, didn't we? Mideast by Midwest

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I recently read an interview with Trevor Horn where he talked about the snare on 90125. I guess there was some consternation about it. Horn said he heard White’s tech tell White that Horn had his snare “sounding like he was dropping a bag of peas”.

Now that's funny. Surely you remember when White was the Ludwig guest drummer with the LHS Percussion Ensemble yearly indoor fahrwerks extravaganza. I was tapped to mix house sound, and record the event.

All goo-goo and ga-ga, I asked White how they got that snare sound on the album, and he dismissively said "someone else tuned'em. I just played."

And we were going for a bag of rocks electro-snare, I recall. Kinda got it on this, didn't we? Mideast by Midwest

– Proteus

I had to plug my iPad into my studio monitors for that one, with the auspiciousness of that re-entering my world...

Yessir, 8-bit chip of a snare through the octaver, along with the ubiquitous “MasterBeat”! Thems was unforgettable times for me. If only I’d realized what a young dick I was sometimes. Karma did emerge, however, if you recall. It was administered on a 100-degree day, in your 150-degree studio, and in the form of a chugged orange California Cooler. Turned my punk @$$ into Veruca Salt.

That’ll learn me.

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While scrolling through Tavo's 80s Gretsch pics, I found out there's (at least) one missing. And it's kinda related to the last pic (obviously mirrored, cos the trapeze tailpiece of George Michael's cats eyed Synchro(?) is a right handed one in the video). My first Gretsch was a mid 60s 6120. And a fellow guitarist teased me a bit for having the same guitar as Andrew Ridgeley, LOL!

Anyway, I grew up in the 80s, and while having a great number of songs from the era that I truly loathe, there's the other bunch that brings back memories to being young, careless, skinny (well, sort of) and having the whole life ahead of me...

Anders

– gretschoholic

I am a product of the late 80s, cant help it. If I wasnt in a band doing 80s pop at a very crucial moment when I was at LLU, I would never have met the little blonde bombshell that transformed my life.

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Aww, what a cute couple!

If I was you, I'd keep her.

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Nice ducktail. You no sideburn wearing summamabich.

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One last one. I can't tell if she's being sultry or mortified. I'm out.

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Dang, you married Belinda Carlisle (another 80’s reference)?

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I can't tell if she's being sultry or mortified. I'm out.

I've spent a little time with the two of them together. She's being stern, laying down the law,. He's doing his best to look unthreateningly defiant.

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I can't tell if she's being sultry or mortified. I'm out.

I've spent a little time with the two of them together. She's being stern, laying down the law,. He's doing his best to look unthreateningly defiant.

– Proteus

You should have been a Psychologist!

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The 80's also gave us some amazing Bass players. Two influences that come to mind for me are John Taylor of Duran Duran w his pop Syncopation (Rio is killer, listen to the bass during the sax solo)

and Flea of the RHCP with his Brothers Johnson & P-Funk style of Funk attack(frusciante peaked my interest in gretsch to boot) - The bands best work occurred under the influence of drugs. I am grateful that Anthony Kedis is recovered and Frusciante is working hard on maintaining his sobriety as well..but damn the budda zen crap they put out now is aggravating.

here's (bad analog vid) subway to venus live w David Sanborn sitting in, Flea is LOCKED and on Fire w Chad on kit and Frusciante is tower of power focused.

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Romeo Void..... This song sounds as new and bad ass as the day Rick Ocasik produced it back in the early 80’s

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Suburban Lawns! An amazing band..... These guys had an incredible talent and took creativity by the balls.
My most prized album belongs to these quirky souls.

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...and perhaps one of the most Powerful albums of any decade came from 1982. Peter Gabriel’s “Security” Frightened me when I first heard it. Then it captivated men, then it became a profound religious experience. To this day these songs move me into a realm of which I transcend my physical body. If you have a “Sound” system I highly recommend laying on a hard wood floor, turning the volume up as loud as possible and “experience” this album! I can say with certainty, it has changed my life...

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Well, Hip, I'll up the ante with the ultra-cool...

PLIMSOULS!!!

Start at 3:00.

K

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Or these guys (but I still can't find the MTV Emotion vid):

K

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Speaking of the Plimsouls, I saw Peter Case a year ago. Looks like a vagabond now but he still has it. David Lindley never ages.

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Well, Hip, I'll up the ante with the ultra-cool...

PLIMSOULS!!!

Start at 3:00.

K

– Konrad

The 80’s seem like they’re A Million Miles Away!

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David Lindley! My God yes! First time I heard Mercury Blues I was hooked for life. He is a monster on anything with strings on it.

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Ok.... when I first heard Joe Jackson’s “look Sharp” album I was literally in shock... I had no idea such amazing music existed. Ill never forget riding in my buddies car and he put the cassette on his hi-tech “auto reverse” tape deck, smurfing blew my mind! .....and talk about bass players! Graham Maby!!’

A know technical it was the late 70’s when this album came out but Joe was ahead of his time..... this was the 80’s baby! ...and again that bass!

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Imagine me begging the taxi driver to JUST MAKE IT STOP!

On the other hand, that guy must have had a real set of cajones to sing thought provoking lines like this live:

OOOO OOOO Ooo ooo ooooOOOO!

K

– Konrad

Wow horrendous! I love the music of that decade especially 1980 to about 1984. But even much of the rest of the decade was good. I was a teen back then. Class of 1985. Suburban Los Angeles. I liked all kinds of music then. I was a New Wave” kid. Hated the term then but now I look at it with fondness.

So many great acts back then. Many started in the 70s. Some started in the 80s. The Polecats, The Smiths, X, The Cars, Echo and The Bunnymen, The Police, The Pretenders, Killing Joke, PiL, Bow Wow Wow, The Clash, Gang of Four, The Ocean Blue, Oingo Boingo, INXS, The Strat Cars, Missing Persons, A Flock of Seagulls, The Cult and the list goes on.

I guess you gotta be into “new wave” and post punk and punk.

I disagree that Guitar was not big back then. A lot of hair bands, Brit bands like Bow Wow Wow, The Smiths and Echo. Rockabilly and Punk like X, The Stray Cats and The Polecats for example. Even new wave acts had amazing guitarist. Bands like Missing Persons, A Flock of Seaguls and The Cars for example.

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i saw Billy Idol at one of Neil Young's Bridge concerts c.1986, and he was surprisingly great. he played acoustic with Stevens on guitar and Keith Forsey on snare drum, and kicked so hard that Tom Petty, who played next, commented "and you thought Elvis was dead."

i would be remiss not to point out some of the great UK bassists of the 80s, most notably Peter Hook of Joy Division/New Order, the bassist who launched a thousand ships with his high-note/phased sound, and Stephen Hanley of The Fall.

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Horrendous music is still being made.

I had knee surgery last week. In my 30 years of OR experience, it’s not uncommon for orthopaedic surgeons to play loud music during surgery. As the anesthesia began to creep in, Cold Play starting playing. I couldn’t stop laughing. I asked the anesthesiologist who’s shit playlist it was then I was out.

I was still laughing when I woke up.

– Powdog

I can't listen to Coldplay. To me, Chris Martin sounds like Prince Herbert from Swamp Castle.

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Great music is being made today. Same as it ever was.


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