Miscellaneous Rumbles

I’ve gone stale..

1

Hi folks,

Playing guitar the other night my wife said ‘why do you always play the same things?’

Then i realised... i do! I’ve stopped learning/trying new things!

Has this happened anyone? What’s the best way out of it?!! Even playing along to new songs i find I just generally noodle/solo along but it’s nothing new... I’m playing almost 30 years so i don’t need one to one lessons, but just some inspiration!!

thanks!

2

Don’t discount the power of a good lesson. I started taking lessons again before Christmas after having lapsed for about 8 years and it has really opened things up for me.

3

Maybe you’re right. Maybe that’ll give me the kick I need?!

4

Lessons can never hurt, although face to face lessons are certainly a challenge now.

There is such a wealth of instructions on YouTube from various folks, that I usually go there first to learn something new.

Sometimes it's a song I'll hear that I'd like to learn either part of or the whole thing, and I'll search YT for it. Usually I'll use "guitar lesson" then the song title or something like "solo". Like anything, there are both good lessons, and not so good lessons on there. You'll also find folks playing the same thing in different ways/ positions, as you'd expect so choose as you feel is best for you. I have found there are some teachers I really like how the explain things, and are doing songs or styles that appeal to me. Once you are following them, you can be on the look out and get notified for new videos from them as they are released. Best of luck!

5

Metman is correct about YouTube. I spend a lot of time on YouTube and have subscribed to a few dozen people who offer great information, lessons, discussions, you name it. The information and instruction on YouTube is exponentiating daily. If you just GOOGLE the subject matter you want, then go to "videos," you will find a starting point. If you like the lesson or whatever it gives you, you can add the specific video to your favorites, "like it" and even subscribe to the channel. If you also "ring the bell," (hit the little bell feature), you'll get notifications on new vids from this channel when you log onto Youtube. Be warned, the more you search or access these channels or subject matter, YouTube learns about your interests and loads suggested videos into your home YouTube page that are similar or somehow related to your search habits. Personally, I find the latter useful because it has taken me to channels that I wouldn't have known about and/or thought about that are very helpful to what I want to learn.

For what it's worth, the amount of free information on Youtube is awesome. You will always get a few commercials in almost every video, but you can sometimes skip past them if Youtube allows it. Otherwise, a small price to pay for a ton of great information.

6

Yes, a good time for creative intervention...

My wife just ordered me a DVD pack with 24 lessons, all styles and scales, etc. just to move my mind off the favorites...

7

yeah I've found some really good stuff on the Tube. Really enjoy this guys stuff Link

8

I've never been one to learn solos note for note:1. because it's hard 2. I want to see what I'd play over it. But this summer I learned the little lick in the Joe Walsh solo to Life's Been Good To Me So Far. Then when I started playing it in other positions I noticed it was almost the exact same lick as Victim of Love. Now you may not like either of those songs but I figured out that the same lick played in different phrasing and timing sounded so good on so many other songs.

I did the same thing with Wish You Were Here. The intro lead can really be moved up or down the neck and inserted into almost any rock song. So I've started learning iconic licks and seeing how many different songs I can play the same notes in, forward/backward and in different phrasing.

Opened up a whole new world of lick-dom. Also, I've been watching Michael Palmisano's channel and (as he calls it) 3rd hunting...trying to land on the third of every chord change to sale the melody. That's been fun because I never really bothered to learn the actual notes of the middle strings.

9

Well whether 'same' = same songs, same leads/solos, same keys -- E and A are favorites, etc. --- it is true that lessons help, listening to other non-guitar instruments help -- heard some trumpet solo from the old jazz says that gave me a few ideas.

Also playing with people who are different than you -- even if it doesn't sound all that great like clash of styles, still you might pick up something you had not thought of.

10

yeah I've found some really good stuff on the Tube. Really enjoy this guys stuff Link

– tabletop

Eric Haugen is my favorite for guitar lessons. His style is exactly the way I want to play, and I've learned so much from his videos.

11

The NON-availability of actual paying gigs for live dance crowds is a substantial barrier to getting inspired. Until that situation changes (if it ever does) we'll be a lot like the folks who do Civil War re-enactments.

Funny how nobody re-enacts WW1 trench warfare or Operation Barbarossa.....

13

I’ve gone through this..... I guess I’m going through it. One eye opener for me is more of an ear opener. I’ve learned scales and chords and all the yadda yadda yadda.... I realized I can hear any note and sing it.... but I can’t necessarily do that on the guitar? I know my breakthrough will come when I can do that. Got to get out of my head and into my ears!

14

One more thing I’m in the process of learning, is how to put my personality into my playing... I watch/ listen to Greg Koch play and what I admire most is his sense of humor.

15

Thanks all, some great info there. I’m wondering if a new black falcon would inspire me too... Although that might also inspire my wife to kill me..

16

Whenever I get that feeling, I pull up an unknown rhythm jam track online somewhere and play around with it to spark new ideas.

17

The NON-availability of actual paying gigs for live dance crowds is a substantial barrier to getting inspired. Until that situation changes (if it ever does) we'll be a lot like the folks who do Civil War re-enactments.

Funny how nobody re-enacts WW1 trench warfare or Operation Barbarossa.....

– DaveH

Since Texas doesn’t believe in Covid, there are plenty of open slots of paying gigs. Just have to hang out with the mouth breathing crowd.

18

Youtube is great as always, and when in a rut i push myself by listening to stuff i dont normally consume, so lately I'm devouring death metal, Persian EDM . Learning a whole new instrument is also really fun. Has y'all know I've played oud for years but recently started delving into the saz baglama. That is a challenge.... Huge and unwieldy, with some microtone frets. I also picked up a couple of cheap basses.... I've never actually owned a bass until now and I'm having great fun!

I remember Pat Martino said he used to do a trick to get out of a rut of randomly retuning the guitar, playing his known scales and patterns from muscle memory, transcribing the resultsand then relearning that on a regular tuning.....

19

You may try varying you rstyle with your songs. For example, play one of your stand by's in ska or punk, or use a 12 string for different tones. Good luck, man.

20

A really fun thing for me was to switch from noodling over blues, was finding a spaghetti western track and playing slide over it. Just Google spaghetti western backing track. Or learn a song in open tuning.

I’ve only played slide <10Xs my whole life...so no judging.

21

So many songs. So much technique. So little time...

22

Funny how nobody re-enacts WW1 trench warfare or Operation Barbarossa.....

and the Civil War guys never do Andersonville or Antietam.

23

I turn oft to pedals. When they're compelling, fresh, or just strange enough, I find myself spontaneously reaching for techniques I'd never previously imagined or noticed, as well as intervallic relationships I rarely use otherwise. Part of that is to control something unfamiliar, another part is to chase voicings, scales, or counterpoints that wouldn't have come up had I not been going somewhere the pedal led me.

24

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25

All above great advice. Is it obvious we've discussed this before?


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