Miscellaneous Rumbles

Is Punk Rock from the 70’s ,considered “Classic Rock” ?

26

It's weird. Different shops will do it differently. X will be in the rock section and the Dead Kennedys in the punk section. And as far as I can determine, "Indy" is a production/distribution designation that has no relation to music.

27

To me, Indie/Indy can be all over the place. I agree with your assessment.

There were quite a few crossover tunes back then that got radio play on top 40. The Clash had several of those on "London Calling" which brought them into the mainstream music category. Bow-Wow-Wow and a few other punkers had airplay in the 80's that made those songs more top 40 appealing so they were put on the air. MTV changed the game back then, as well. Way too many one hit wonders and some of those were cross genre players.

Elvis was a rocker then did some gospel and country, right? The way I look at it, songs that had airplay back then in that category would be classic "whatever genre" but not the artist/band themselves, right?

So basically the Clash would be a punk band that got some top 40 attention but that wouldn't make them a classic rock band. Just my thoughts.

28

Plus 1 to what Drmilktruck said above. It also reflects my opinion towards my parents’ music.

29

Whatever you call it, it's OLD, so to a younger person like my son, it all runs together.

or

My kids who are 11 and 14 might consider any rock as classic rock.

Since this came up quite a bit here, I would like to add: Just because younger or less informed respectively interested people don't make a difference doesn't mean there isn't one.

30

Whatever you call it, it's OLD, so to a younger person like my son, it all runs together.

or

My kids who are 11 and 14 might consider any rock as classic rock.

Since this came up quite a bit here, I would like to add: Just because younger or less informed respectively interested people don't make a difference doesn't mean there isn't one.

– sascha

Be careful about casting aspersions on those younger. The converse of what you say may also be true: people who split hairs exaggerate the differences that others see. My son likes both the Clash and Deep Purple. He just puts them both in the category of Dad music.

Following on Baba Joe's comments. My father and mother came of age in the 1940s. So they identified most strongly with swing music. I can tell the difference between Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman and Glenn Miller, but where do Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie, and Artie Shaw fit? I have friends who could tell you in exhaustive detail how they're not the same, but my eyes just glaze over.

Time marches on and is not kind to the older folks.

31

Be careful about casting aspersions on those younger.

I'm not casting anything. It's just the way it is and it has always been. And be sure I know where I stand in this game. I can't tell classical Baroque music from Renaissance. It's just classical music to me. I can't tell a Chevrolet from a Cadillac. It's an old American car to me. Because I'm too young for this. And I don't really care. And I see nothing wrong with it. Just as I'm totally fine with younger people than me not knowing and caring about what I like. Still, that doesn't mean there are no differences. That's what I'm saying.

32

Well..... I was a punk before you were a punk!

33

No its not classic rock by any means. It (Punk Rock) was never embraced by AOR FM radio in 1980. All "Classic Rock:" bands were staples of FM radio 1977-1997. Plus it was Punk Rock. Not Journey.

Journey wasn't singing "Why cant I touch it' !!!

There is certainly classic Punk. (And I got to see many many of them in 81-84 era)

– Gasmoney

+1 and then some! You never heard the Clash on mainstream FM radio before "Train in Vain" came out (and IMO, anything by them after the "Give 'em Enough Rope" album is mediocre as it is),and by that time, they were heading towards a more mainstream sound with songs like "Should I Stay or Should I Go", and "Rock The Casbah."

The Ramones, X, Dead Kennedys, The Dead Boys, The Suicide Commandos, etc. - you only heard them on college and underground radio. You still mainly only hear them in that kind of radio format nowadays.

Nope, punk rock is only classic age-wise, but does not fit the Journey, "Spirit of Radio" era Rush, The Eagles. 1979 and later REO Speedwagon, "Rumors" era Fleetwood Mac music format. It definitely doesn't even fit in with prog rock, Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Cream, Steppenwolf, etc.

34

Well..... I was a punk before you were a punk!

– Hipbone

That's a cool song! I like The Tubes' original version, but the version by Electric Frankenstein is even cooler!

35

Calling something "classic" is all nonsense created by radio stations to sell stuff. Punk rock from the '70s is punk rock. Or to agree with Billy - "Real" punk rock!

At the time the differences between the Sex Pistols and mainstream music seemed huge - the Pistols were so shocking, but again this was largely a creation of hype and media. The Pistols were simply an excellent rock'nroll band who remembered what was good about rock'n'roll in the first place. It was about fun, excitement, exhilaration and simplicity. It wasn't about trying to impress an audience with brilliance but about being part of something together in some very difficult times.

The cycle continues - and "punk" as a genre becomes a style more than an attitude. Whoever wanted corporate punk? That's what we get now. So other musicians crop up to prick the bubble. Genre is usually determined by the critic or the people trying to sell it. Who cares what it's called? It's either good or bad - that's all that really matters.

36

Great question having worked many Punk venues. Punk Rock was a rebellious movement. Different from New Wave which was the commercialization of Punk Rock. A lot of people will put bands into the Punk Rock category that doesn't belong, like Nirvana. Punk Rock was already dead and gone by the time they formed a group. I think Punk Rock holds its own unique category - for now.

37

Well..... I was a punk before you were a punk!

– Hipbone

You're Old .

38

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was the first punk rocker.

39

All great points above and also never considered Punk as "Classic Rock". I usually dialed in to Scott Muni on 102.7 here in the NYC/tri-state area and always think of him when I hear the term "Classic Rock" of which he also played prog. rock but punk is punk and no posers allowed.

I just always considered punk as it's own rebellious specialty against all that is commercial and mainstream. I then thought of "Classic Rock" as the good old "2 -for-Tuesday" material that hit all those that did include some "hard rock" like AC/DC ripped out Mac, Floyd, Zep, Hendrix, Cream and a million others.

I think Classic Rock was the border that didn't let bands like Duran Duran, Tears For Fears, Til Tuesday, Talk Talk and "pop" of the '80s in the door. But....somehow Christopher Cross and Joe Jackson slipped in.

40

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was the first punk rocker.

Nah. He'd be perfectly at home, spewing perfect arpeggios against perfect chord progressions, preening his perfect hair, in the Eagles.

Who - as we know - are perfect. (And about as punk as Anne Murray, only harder to take.)


I don't know that any classical composer - or instrumentalist - can be considered punk. But plenty wanted to blow up the musical establishment of their time - and any number of moderns have deployed intentional primitivism in their music, so maybe.

I guess Stravinsky was pretty punk. Rite of Spring caused a riot at its debut in 1913. And it's noisy. Maybe that qualifies.

41

Neither is 1950s Rock n Roll considered Classic Rock. One may call it "rock" but it really is Rock n Roll. I see many similarities of 50s Rock 'n Roll and Punk and neither are considered "Classic Rock". Some may say it doesn't get anymore classic than Elvis and Chuck Berry but still it is good old fashioned Rock 'n Roll music and not what later would be called Classic Rock.

42

I have to admit that if I hear someone saying they will be playing "classic rock" I usually run the other way!

43

I have to admit that if I hear someone saying they will be playing "classic rock" I usually run the other way!

– JimmyR

Why?

44

I'm convinced that the term 'Classic Rock' was invented/created, in part, to distinguish aging rock of the 60s and 70s from what we know as 'Oldies' or 50s rock & roll.

I know it has been integral in radio airplay formatting, one of the earliest users of the term.
I've also noticed the 'Oldies' radio stations these days encompass not only the 50s, and into 60s pop, but even the more AM hits of the 70s.

'Classic Rock' seems to be more etheric, speaking of an era of popular music, rather than addressing its actual age. Mostly mid 60s to late 80s FM dial music, but more importantly; it had to enjoy a certain degree of popularity then.

I've never heard punk music played on any of the FM 'classic rock' stations in Chicago. No Ramones, no X, no Sex Pistols, .. The Pretenders or Elvis Costello is about as 'punk' as it gets with any of them.

45

Stravinsky wasn’t punk. Stravinsky was METAL! I can’t listen to the ROS without banging my head.

46

I'm convinced that the term 'Classic Rock' was invented/created, in part, to distinguish aging rock of the 60s and 70s from what we know as 'Oldies' or 50s rock & roll.

I know it has been integral in radio airplay formatting, one of the earliest users of the term.
I've also noticed the 'Oldies' radio stations these days encompass not only the 50s, and into 60s pop, but even the more AM hits of the 70s.

'Classic Rock' seems to be more etheric, speaking of an era of popular music, rather than addressing its actual age. Mostly mid 60s to late 80s FM dial music, but more importantly; it had to enjoy a certain degree of popularity then.

I've never heard punk music played on any of the FM 'classic rock' stations in Chicago. No Ramones, no X, no Sex Pistols, .. The Pretenders or Elvis Costello is about as 'punk' as it gets with any of them.

– Edison

Kind of like how old guitars became vintage. That term used to be reserved to Golden Era acoustics & electrics through the 60s. Then 70s guitars were added, now 80s and I've even seen 90s guitars described as vintage.

Used cars are now pre-owned.

47

Stravinsky wasn’t punk. Stravinsky was METAL!

I'll accept that. The true forerunner of math rock. Also, the plot of the ballet culminates in the sacrifice of a virgin.

48

Edison I agree. I am pretty sure money and marketing is behind coining Classic Rock, Rock 'n Roll and Oldies. Everything is money oriented. For targeting demographics and advertising dollars these terms were coined.

I like music, so any so-called genre has good music but I am more likely to listen to oldies or Rock 'n Roll over 60s and 70s Classic Rock but those styles have their place and have their good songs too. I noticed people who are into "Classic Rock" aren't likely to listen to anything 50s. To them I think that Rockabilly and 50s R&R are just cheap novelty songs. I also like a lot of early Punk but I was never a punk rocker. Essentially any song that sounds good I like. Doesn't matter the genre. I grew up listening to oldies and "New Wave", which is a broad term. So one minute I may be listening to OMD or Sparks or The Cars and the next listening to Bill Haley and His Comets, then to X or Sham 69 then on to Journey. I am all over the board. Anything that sounds good I like. I won't however be listening to The Beatles or Kansas. Not my thing.

49

Stravinsky wasn’t punk. Stravinsky was METAL! I can’t listen to the ROS without banging my head.

– Tsar Nicholas

But Sheena and Judy are.

50

Where I live "Classic Rock" is interpreted as Eagles, Cold Chisel, Foreigner, '70s Fleetwood Mac, Bon Jovi, '70s Rod Stewart, Mondo Rock, INXS.... I have heard this stuff and don't ever need to hear it again.

The term "classic" is so arbitrary and lazy. In radio terms it just means crap you've heard a gazzilion times before because we chose to play it then and are too lazy to find anything new for you to listen to. It's not what I choose to listen to.

As for Mozart - he definitely started out on the alternative charts before becoming mainstream. Elements of Bowie and Prince.


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