Miscellaneous Rumbles

Is Punk Rock from the 70’s ,considered “Classic Rock” ?

1

So I was reading another Thread Topic concerning "Classic Rock" , and it occured to me that 70's Punk music is almost 50 years old now, and depending on what you consider the roots of Punk, it just might be a little older.

And Without getting into the whole "Who started Punk" ,Bullsh*t debate which has been discussed Ad Nauseam already ,does 70's Punk music fall under the "Classic Rock" genre ? Considering bands like Fleetwood Mac and Journey which are considered "classic", were performing simultaneously around the same time as The Clash , The Sex Pistols and other early Punk pioneers like X.

2

As a high school graduate of 1976 I say no. Through the 80's and 90's and I suppose Sirius now, classic rock stations did not play punk. Not even The Ramones. I don't consider the punk genre anymore classic rock than I do many of the metal bands of that day.

3

depends on whether you're using "classic" strictly as a marker of age (in the sense that once a car is x years old you can register it as "vintage" in VA) or as the name of a genre/period a la British Invasion or post-punk. if you're being strict about it, "Classic Rock" ended around the time Kenny Jones joined The Who...that's literally the crossover point where "Classic Rock" radio ends and "Hits of the 80s, 90s, and Now" begins. if you listen to a "Modern Rock" (ha!) station you won't hear anything earlier than "You Better You Bet" and "Eminence Front." but to me some early punk was small-c "classic" as soon as i heard it. the first time i heard the Sex Pistols i knew that their music would live forever.

4

I think some of the mainstream stuff, ie Ramones might be categorized that way, but lots of the really x-treme stuff epecially from UK would not not. Or crazed late 70s ie. Dead Boys... just never heard now, if even that much then

5

Boiling down macphisto's point: if considered as a genre (and I morless agree with his delineation), no. If considered as a form of rock which happened at the same time, and "classic" only by virtue of being old...yes.

But if I was more of a punk fan, I wouldn't want it grouped with classic-rock-the-genre. I think you could refer to classic punk.

6

I am a massive fan of punk in general in terms of it’s spirit and values, so I would baulk at it being considered ‘classic rock’.

It’s hard to argue that London Calling is not a classic rock album, but it is definitely not a ‘classic rock’ album.

7

It’s hard to argue that London Calling is not a classic rock album, but it is definitely not a ‘classic rock’ album.

That says it.

8

Let me check the Cable Music Channels, then Muzak...nope, no Punk per se

...only Internet and Satellite Radio to be found.

I contend a Greatest Hits compilation Punk format is easily Classic Rock at this point, but only the widely recognized, better impact songs. Like any genre, there is an overload of mediocre.

9

No its not classic rock by any means. It (Punk Rock) was never embraced by AOR FM radio in 1980. All "Classic Rock:" bands were staples of FM radio 1977-1997. Plus it was Punk Rock. Not Journey.

Journey wasn't singing "Why cant I touch it' !!!

There is certainly classic Punk. (And I got to see many many of them in 81-84 era)

10

Yes. Definitively!

11

No. Classic rock begat prog rock, which is precisely what punk was rebelling against. It had all got just too much.

Punk was its own thing.

13

There was no such genre as "classic rock" when the music now so classified was current. The term is retrospective and pedagogical, taking more or less commercial rock of a particular era, sharing (I suppose) enough formal and stylistic traits to lump it together ... and, in fact, lumping it together to characterize as much a marketable demographic as a genre.

As I don't think of anything from the 60s as "classic rock," I don't see any meaningful way in which it begat prog, and I think that confuses both the timeline and any attempt to put the genres in context.

There was British Invasion, garage rock, and plain'ol' Top 40 rock of the 60s, which sent off psychedelic and "underground" shoots, which morphed shortly after into what would become metal and what would become prog (with another strain becoming "jazz-rock"/fusion). But those nascent genres were so closely related at the time that it was by no means obvious how (or even that) they would diverge.

Between them, they siphoned off much of the energy and creativity of the mainstream...which, purified of those two pollutants, turgidly convulsed and brought forth the tepid twins of country/southern rock and commercial radio rock - both "genres" which continued to make hay from traditional American roots forms from blues to country (while prog and metal diverged increasingly from them). A couple decades later, that mainstream was labeled classic rock by radio programmers in order to sell advertising meant to reach a certain demographic.

Punk stood in reaction to all of that - certainly as much counter to The Eagles as to Emerson Lake and Peepot. I think it insults punk - and confuses what is really blues/country rock - to think of punk under that heading.

14

My kids who are 11 and 14 might consider any rock as classic rock. I'll have to ask them. I'm thinking from their perspective any guitar based music would either be country or rock. They know The Ramones from the Tom Holland Spider Man movies, they know Led Zeppelin's Immigrant Song from Thor, they know some Metallica from having friends who like rock and I made sure they know about Elvis and The Beatles. To them it's all rock.

15

The local "Classic Rock" radio station in Los Angeles regularly plays The Ramones as well as The Clash and U2. 25 years ago that would have been unheard of if not insulting to their fan base, Now its a daily routine.

I concur Punk is NOT "Classic Rock" and Im well aware that PUNK is in a totally diffeent genre than 70's Rock,( I grew up a Punker and I still hate hearing The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac),but its getting to the point where the lines are getting blurred and anything old is all getting muddled together.

And speaking of London Calling,( the Greatest Album ever made) ,released in 1979 and not one single song on that fantastic double album sounds like a true 70's Punk song. Death or Glory is the closest tune on that entire album that sounds even very remotely a little Punk. London Calling,, Punk in spirit ,but its still just pure Rock N Roll to me.

16

its getting to the point where the lines are getting blurred and anything old is all getting muddled together.

Ah well. Tis the way of the world. We oldings and our quaint interests matter less and less. It's probably the way it ought to be. When I was 20, I sure didn't care about my grandparents' opinions about the difference between, say, Al Jolson and Bing Crosby.

17

Maybe it is because "Classic Rock" is a very broad term. Or maybe it is not. I don't think it is but like I say "Classic Rock" is a very broad term. "Maybe it just is Classic Punk Rock"

18

The local "Classic Rock" radio station in Los Angeles regularly plays The Ramones as well as The Clash and U2. 25 years ago that would have been unheard of if not insulting to their fan base, Now its a daily routine.

I concur Punk is NOT "Classic Rock" and Im well aware that PUNK is in a totally diffeent genre than 70's Rock,( I grew up a Punker and I still hate hearing The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac),but its getting to the point where the lines are getting blurred and anything old is all getting muddled together.

And speaking of London Calling,( the Greatest Album ever made) ,released in 1979 and not one single song on that fantastic double album sounds like a true 70's Punk song. Death or Glory is the closest tune on that entire album that sounds even very remotely a little Punk. London Calling,, Punk in spirit ,but its still just pure Rock N Roll to me.

– LA_Manny

If you are talking about KLOS they played U2 in the 80s starting with songs from The War album.

19

If you are talking about KLOS they played U2 in the 80s starting with songs from The War album.

– ThePolecats

I wouldnt know, I listened to KROQ or music on cassette.

20

Well it’s classic that’s for sure!

21

I wouldnt know, I listened to KROQ or music on cassette.

– LA_Manny

You only listened to one station?

My stations to listen to were, in order of importance -

KROQ

KRTH (K-Earth 101)

KLOS

KMET (now defunct)

22

I suspect that John Lydon, Joey Ramone, Joe Strummer, Henry Rollins, et al would either be horrified at being lumped in with the "classic rock" they were rebelling against, or in true punk spirit, they wouldn't give a f**k.

23

It's considered Classic Punk Rock! Or REAL Punk Rock!!

24

I love the thought of Suicidal Tendencies' "Institutionalized" next to REO Speedwagon's "Keep On Lovin' You".

Just think of the playlists Spotify could generate with all that Punk and Classic rock!

25

Whatever you call it, it's OLD, so to a younger person like my son, it all runs together. I doubt he sees a difference between The Clash and Deep Purple. Plus with the passage of time, what was shocking becomes mundane. Listen to the Velvet Underground now, it's hard to believe people thought it was avant garde. Same is true of classic punk. Mohawks elicit a yawn now.


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