Miscellaneous Rumbles

Idiot warps wife’s wooden bowls with water, would wike to wectify w…

1

After eating a delicious and nutritious salad as part of a family meal, a friend of mine, trying to do his part to help out in the kitchen, ran tapwater into a pair of treasured turned wood bowls - then left them sitting in the sink that way.

My friend now acknowledges that, in retrospect, the results were predictable.

Hoping to avoid embarrassment, my friend didn't post his question on Facebook or in any of the fine woodworking or helpful home hints sites, instead asking me to put the word out here, where the membership is so wise in the ways of the things that sometimes befuddle and bewilder hapless mens.

So the question goes out to y'all: any ideas on returning this warped bowl to its original round and straight conformation? My friend would be most appreciative.

2

I assume it's unfinished wood with a vegetable oil sealer. The only thing I can think of to try(no guarantees since the wood moved where it naturally wanted to go) is to run it under some warm water for awhile, then clamp it in it's desired position very carefully. After awile it should return to shape, keep clamped, and then oil the crap out of it to lock it back as best you can. There will be some spring back, and it may need a few similar treatments. As I said, no guarantees, just some thoughts about it on my end.

3

I will post this in my fishing forum "Off Topic" category if no adequate response is reached here.

Those cats will know...

...------

4

Having spent several years working in a custom woodworking shop, I believe the only way to restore the shape would be to make a mold of both the interior and exterior original shapes, soak the bowls again to soften the wood, then clamp them firmly and allow to dry naturally over several days. Not unlike creating a pressed archtop for a guitar. It could take more than one treatment.

Alternatively, if the wood is thick enough, the bowls could be re-lathed to restore symmetry (and then refinished), but the resulting shapes would be different than the originals. It might be simpler and cheaper to buy new bowls, but if there's strong sentimental attachment to these particular ones, you could be SOL.

I hope your friend has a comfortable couch!

6

What Jazzbox said.... but I would be curious to know how your friend was supposed to wash these... or are they not washed at all?

Your friend may end up being banned in the basement, maybe he will be able to play guitar there... why do I sense your friend has guitars in his basement?

7

Pretty sure that this guy is the answer to your prayers... he's a professional.

an example of his work--

8
  1. Banish "your friend" from the kitchen, we now know the good that brings.
  2. If "your friend" is a handyman fix-it type follow the suggestions above but,
  3. Scour internet sites like Etsy for replacements.
  4. Find a better scapegoat.
9

I don't know why I just lost a very long post to you, with good explanations,sorry, but you seem to be an exceptional handy man with skill. ( yeah I know) If you have a decent lathe and know your way around it, you could re-turn that. DO NOT CUT YOUR FINGERS OFF. Makes it hard to play the git. Shit, if we were closer I would just do it for free and make you pick with me. Hell, I want to pick with you for free anyway. Find a local wood man and let him turn it for you. Should not cost much.

10

Sorry for not getting here earlier, i was shaving at lunch.

Tell you friend to apply some guitar wood bending skills to the bowl. Think steam & pressue over time...in the correct form.

Now, back to my skin prep for my pre 5 o'clock shadow shave.

11

Wabi Sabi

They are now as unique as those who enjoy them.

12

Having built several guitars with bent sides, the way I think you can try to return the bowl to its former glory is to hold the bowl in place while exposing it to steam for an extended period then letting it cool. The heat and moisture from the steam loosens the wood fibers, and after clamping, the cooling process sets the shape as the fibers lock together again. You may have to build a steam box for this and find a source for creating and controlling the steam. Good luck!

13

Surely there's somebody on the GDP who has enough of a creative vision to conceptualize and create proper-radius bar bridges-- maybe talk to that guy? He might have an insight on correcting the inner arc radius of a wooden bowl...

Sorry Tim-- just funnin' ya. I don't envy your current position on this matter. If it were my wife, she'd just chuck the rest of the bowls and go out an buy a completely new set of them... on my dime, of course.

14

Now it's a conversation piece. You've added value with your 'mod'.

15

Did Krepke write the title of this thread for you?

16

Tell your friend to try one of these to get rid of that nasty water:

17

Did Krepke write the title of this thread for you?

– Suprdave

I don't think so, but I'd guess that unintentionally wrecking the wife's kitchenware would make you feel a little bit like this guy--

18

Form does follow function. They are still concave and will still hold a salad. I suggest that "your friend" claim that new wooden bowls were bought at Pier 1 from their Salvador Dali wooden ware collection.

19

Tight spot. Your bowl is a glue-up of different pieces of wood. Steam might soften the glue joints. And although it looks thick enough to re-turn, it might be warped enough to wobble like hell if you chucked it up in a lathe. If I were gonna try and fix it, I would repeat the process that goofed it up in the first place. Fill it full of hot water and let it soak for a little while. Then empty it and clamp it down so the rim sits flat and leave it for a few days.

Personally, I think it looks awsome the way it is. I'd sand it down and apply a good coat of mineral or butcher block oil. Let people marvel over your "off-set" turning skills.

20

Or you could wear it.

21

Having built several guitars with bent sides, the way I think you can try to return the bowl to its former glory is to hold the bowl in place while exposing it to steam for an extended period then letting it cool. The heat and moisture from the steam loosens the wood fibers, and after clamping, the cooling process sets the shape as the fibers lock together again. You may have to build a steam box for this and find a source for creating and controlling the steam. Good luck!

– Frank_NH

Or, you could employ my method when "a friend of mine" did this exact same thing.

Throw it in the fire, and blame one of the kid's friends for making off with it.

You know, the one you don't like hanging around...usually the daughter's new boyfriend.

22

While it may take some convincing, Powdog has a point that "off set turning" is the rage in boutique wood turning circles. This is now functional "art".

23

I'd say your friend is SOL. New bowls seems to be the answer.

24

I'll bet your wife is having a hard time understanding how your friend could allow this to happen.

25

With that degree of warp in a bowl made from glued pieces, it could just be FUBAR.

If your friend is catholic, he may try praying to the patron saint of lost causes.


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