Miscellaneous Rumbles

How often do you clean you’re guitars?

1

It just came to mind after feeling a certain sluggishness while playing and thought to myself, oh hang on maybe it's due to the build up of crap I have on the back of my neck and fingerboard? I gave both a clean and hey presto, playing suddenly got easier. Lol

2

I'm a bit o.c. when it comes to keeping my guitars and equipment clean and polished. They definitely play better, and I love the look of a beautiful instrument with that clear skin smile. Having said that, I'll sometimes let an instrument gather dust and grime for several weeks, if I'm busy with other things...

3

I thoroughly clean them with every string change. My main players get a wax coat once a year. I have a rag in my case so I can wipe them off when I'm finished playing.

I also have a Swiffer feather duster. I'm not a little bit OCD. ;)

4

When I sell it.

6

I'm one of those OCD guys; keep a do-rag in my back pocket to wipe the strings after every time I play, or even a couple times if it's like a six hour practice. I probably give the whole thing a polish with the Gibson stuff every other week, once, and a light fretboard cleaning/conditioning with the dunlop stuff at every string change

7

Every string change (~ every 6 months) I do a thorough cleaning. Lemon oil fret-board, polish the body, etc.

8

You're supposed to clean them?

9

Mine live in cases when not being played, so, toddler fingers and dog noses normally aren't a problem. I wipe them down after playing, and do a decent cleaning when changing strings. Wash your hands before you play, too.

10

I won't part with mine. I'm playing it in the shower.

11

I won't part with mine. I'm playing it in the shower.

– guitarmike

HA! Awesome.

I wipe the strings and guitar with rags after I play. My Duo Jet case has a black bandana which is my favorite rag. Whenever I do a string change they get cleaned with a damp cloth. The rosewood fretboards get a lemon oil treatment when necessary.

12

Wash your hands before you play, too.
And always keep one of these travel size baby powders handy. I was told some famous guitarist keeps one in his case. Wash hands, lightly powder up before playing. Your hands move so quickly up and down the neck and things stay clean.

13

Never, and I ask tech/luthiers not to clean them after/during a setup. Just stay away of my mojo

:)

14

Wash your hands before you play, too.
And always keep one of these travel size baby powders handy. I was told some famous guitarist keeps one in his case. Wash hands, lightly powder up before playing. Your hands move so quickly up and down the neck and things stay clean.

– Spiritwalker

I don't know which artist you are referring to, but, when I saw Jeff Beck in January at the big Gretsch concert during the NAMM Show, he pulled out a full size container of baby powder and covered his hands with it. I have to question the wisdom of this (although I do acknowledge that Beck has been playing the guitar for a little while now) because, in that club where the concert was held, it was hot and he was perspiring fairly heavily. I would think that the baby powder, once mixed with perspiration, would leave a residue on the fretboard, particularly immediately around the frets.

15

Cleaning a guitar? Ha! You don't want to know what gathers inside a trumpet after a while. Seriously, people have died from bacteria growing inside of wind instruments. Well, at least a friend showed me an article from a medical journal that explained one such case. I believe it was a trombone player. An older guy, if I remember right.

16

A little bit of rosin always comes of a fiddle bow when a fiddler plays. Years ago I was in the habit of reaching over with my index finger and thumb to get some of that sticky powdered rosin to help me hang on to my guitar pick. When the fiddler started to clean the old rosin off his fiddle, I bought a shaker of powdered rosin--the kind ball players use to help keep a grip on their bat.

One hot afternoon at a festival another band member saw me put some rosin on my fingers just before a show. Assuming that there was talcum powder in my little shaker, he shook out a generous amount all over both hands. He realized his mistake as the MC at the fest introduced the band. His hands and instrument were a sticky mess, but it was time to hit the stage.

You can bet he gave his mandolin a complete cleaning as soon as we finished our set.

17

when I saw Jeff Beck he pulled out a full size container of baby powder and covered his hands with it. I have to question the wisdom of this
Yes. I looked around the net and found out indeed it was Jeff Beck who is the top guitarist who uses baby powder. I also discovered that Robert Fripp, Frank Zappa, and Ray Flacke also do the baby powder before playing trick.

As far as the wisdom of doing that....come on, are you really going to question Beck? And I just read on another forum that the baby powder doesn't "gunk up" regardless of the gig's atmospheric conditions. Talc, not cornstarch powder, is the recommended powder.

18

Cleaning a guitar? Ha! You don't want to know what gathers inside a trumpet after a while. Seriously, people have died from bacteria growing inside of wind instruments. Well, at least a friend showed me an article from a medical journal that explained one such case. I believe it was a trombone player. An older guy, if I remember right.

– trumpetman

Of late, it's been discovered that a few bagpipers have died from inhaling the bacterial growth inside the stomach of that hideous noise-maker. Not to wish anyone ill, but it does strike me as poetic justice for the pain that windbag inflicts on the public.

19

Since I live in Hawaii, and all doors and windows stay open at home all day and into the evening, my never cased instruments require a bit of look see almost every day. I use a Revlon makeup brush for the nooks and crannies, and a micro cloth to wipe them down, usually moistened with the condensate on my beer can!!! Seriously. What I do pay strict attention to is the weather and rust. I keep those descendant packs around the stands in the living room, and under the hangers in their cabinet and it seems to help. My oldest, a 32 yr old Kramer got ignored by me for quite a while and the result was rusty saddles.

Other than that, I play them, I sweat on them, but I rub the strings down EVERY time I play them, all of them. I use common Maguires car wax on them when I'm feelin frisky...

20

I won't question Beck, simply because I don't care. What works for him, works for him. What works for me...

OK, trying to be serious for a sec: i do clean the fretboard at every string change. Reasonably fresh strings get a wipe down after use - damp, hot microfiber cloth.

I don't think I've ever polished a finish. It' just like with cars - the driving is fun, the cleaning up isn't

21

My guitars don't really get too dirty in the first place. But I do like to clean up all the fingernail dust which falls over the bridge pickup area. I play with a pick and fingers and it's sometimes surprising just how much fingernail gets scraped off by the strings. It can look like the rosin patch on a violin. I have a big (never used for painting) paint brush I keep in my office for dusting the guitar.

I also clean the fingerboard a little bit when changing strings. Strings changes are either every gig if I'm playing or about every 6 months if I'm not. Having worked in a music store I have seen what uncleaned guitars can look (and smell) like. No thanks.

22

Of late, it's been discovered that a few bagpipers have died from inhaling the bacterial growth inside the stomach of that hideous noise-maker. Not to wish anyone ill, but it does strike me as poetic justice for the pain that windbag inflicts on the public.

– Windsordave

Lol, Dave, you'll use any opportunity to bash the bagpipes. I'm half Scottish so how dare you? haha

23

Never... maybe I'll wipe the dust off once in a while

24

i try not to get them dirty in the first place..an ounce of prevention...

haha

cheers

25

After every third set of strings, so once every 15 years.


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