Miscellaneous Rumbles

Guitar stuff I used to do

1

I used to do these things, but its been decades:

  1. wiping strings after playing
  2. Conditioning rosewood fretboards with linseed oil
  3. Boiling strings
  4. Sending away for print copies of catalogs/brochures
  5. Clipping articles out of guitar magazines for future reference
  6. Using a sound hole Pressure mounted pickup in an acoustic
  7. Referencing stompbox user manuals
  8. Looking up suggested amp settings
  9. Mounting a photo In the strings above the nut Marty McFly style
  10. Using guitar case lock and key
2

Still wipe the strings after playing, including the neck, pick guard, pick up covers, and whatever hardware/surfaces I may have touched. I prefer lemon oil for my rosewood fingerboards; just my preference.

3

I used to leave mine for weeks in a sweaty, humid ULockit building where our band practiced 5 days a week. This was a 1988 Kramer Stryker, and I didn’t know any better. Rust became a problem, needless to say...

4

Wipe strings, yes All sorts of gunk comes off. - but nothing else on this list. I have my guitar guy do mods, setups and really tweaking a new acquisition.

5

I have only ever done the first thing on your list. And still do depending on how I feel at the end of a gig.

6

I used to do these things, but its been decades:

  1. wiping strings after playing
  2. Conditioning rosewood fretboards with linseed oil
  3. Boiling strings
  4. Sending away for print copies of catalogs/brochures
  5. Clipping articles out of guitar magazines for future reference
  6. Using a sound hole Pressure mounted pickup in an acoustic
  7. Referencing stompbox user manuals
  8. Looking up suggested amp settings
  9. Mounting a photo In the strings above the nut Marty McFly style
  10. Using guitar case lock and key
– RichB555

My answer to the question: List ten things that are probably good ideas but you've never done them and likely will never do them.

7

I used to do these things, but its been decades:

  1. wiping strings after playing
  2. Conditioning rosewood fretboards with linseed oil
  3. Boiling strings
  4. Sending away for print copies of catalogs/brochures
  5. Clipping articles out of guitar magazines for future reference
  6. Using a sound hole Pressure mounted pickup in an acoustic
  7. Referencing stompbox user manuals
  8. Looking up suggested amp settings
  9. Mounting a photo In the strings above the nut Marty McFly style
  10. Using guitar case lock and key
– RichB555

My list of things I haven't done in decades includes:

  1. Play in a band
  2. Lug around a Twin Reverb
  3. Stack OD pedals
  4. Listen to the Jam, Clash, Springsteen, Bob Marley
  5. Bench press
  6. Go to church
  7. Drive recklessly
  8. Practice string tapping
  9. Eat a yodel, ring ding, pop tart, or popsicle stick
8

I used to change strings.

Now, with my ears, I can't hear the difference between new and old strings!

9

Guitar things I used to do...

play drums

11

Ha, boiling strings....yep, back in my teenage years. I still always wipe the neck and strings down at the end of a practice day or gig; a clean machine, thank you very much.

12

I always wipe the strings and neck after playing. And I give my fretboards a good dose of oil once and a while.

14

wiping down the guitar and strings after play is a good habit to maintain

also to clean the strings with iso alcohol pad will really contribute to string longevity and tone

(boiling is old wives tale!)

stick a few of the small packets in your guitar case and use'm

cheers

15

Actually, boiling them does work to bring them back, at least to some extent. It removes the dirt, but with the cost of most strings so low, one has to question the worth. As a teenager with no money, it made sense at the time, and frugality can be a virtue.

16

Wanna make strings last longer? Wash your hands BEFORE you play - and wipe the strings down after.

Alcohol pads are ideal for the string duty, but a corner of a t-shirt (or un-beery bar towel) will also do. And it ought to go without saying, but maybe we shouldn’t assume: you want to get the fabric under the string too, then pull it up and down its length.

Cleaning the fingerboard when it gunks up, and treating open wood with a light oil annually or so, are also not silly activities. I’ve been working from a single small bottle of clarinet bore oil for 30 years.

I hope the stuff is inert!


Also, with the quantity of pedals I entertain myself with - and the kind and complexity of many of them - I make avid use of the manuals, especially when I first get a pedal (or if I’ve slept since last confronting its controls). With a number of them, I’d be stumbling in the dark - or miss a lot of functionality - if I didn’t.

17

jeez...not once done any of those things on the list

18

I agree with Proteus about washing your hands before playing. When I worked in a guitar store people would bring in guitars for restringing and sometimes they smelt so bad! The crud on the fretboard actually smelt from never having been cleaned but also from someone with obviously filthy hands having played it. Some guitars took longer to clean than they did to restring. And on some guitars the crud hung from the underside of the strings. How is a guitar going to play in tune with crap hanging off the strings?

I admit I am a little obsessive about keeping my hands clean but man - some of these guys must have never washed their hands after eating cheeseburgers and fries. I like to give the fretboard a little clean with every string change and it doesn't take very long. It can help prevent frets from lifting and the player getting botulism.

19

You mean cheesburger grease doesn't work for oiling the fretboard??? And, here, I thought I was getting a two-fer.

20

At the gun and music stores where I’ve worked in my life, sometimes we swore there was some guy in the parking lot, handing out jelly sandwiches to people on their way into the stores.

21

I used to do every one of those things on the list, but over time, most of them have dropped off. The only things I still do are - wiping the strings (360°), conditioning the fretboard, and using manuals. My old eyes don't particularly like the small (and getting smaller) print used in pedal manuals. It seems to be a practice that has found its way into many manuals for small items.

I also used to be fastidious about wiping down and body and hardware of the guitar, but that's even being done less often. I still wipe down gold plated hardware after each session, but only clean the body of the guitar and chrome hardware before each guitar is stabled, at the end of its time in the rotation. I'm not currently gigging, but if I were, I'd be on stage with a guitar, as clean and shiny as it could be. "Monkees like shiny things"!

22

I've always been neurotic about keeping guitars clean and looking sparkly new. So yes -- I wipe the strings with a polishing cloth (plain) after playing and wipe the body with a soft Fender microfiber cloth after playing.

(Note to the curious: don't waste time trying to sell me a new reliced guitar. NOT happening...)

I am also a bit neurotic about clean hands (for lots of reasons).

I apply finger board oil during string changes.

Stomp box user manuals -- As a Strymonizer, those manuals are a MUST.

No more Twin Reverbs for me...... But I have to admit that a Standel 25L15 is not a whole lot lighter -- somewhere between 50 - 55 pounds. The JBL D-130 itself is 24 pounds!

23

Clean hands, clean strings, clean machine. There is a really good guitar tech near here, but after using him once, I'll never go back because his shop was filthy, and his guitar that he wanted me to try was so dirty that all I could think of was getting home to wash my hands, and I'm not what you'd call a germophobe. Aside from respecting the instrument as an extension of oneself, trying to play with dirty hands or with a dirty neck/fingerboard is distracting and makes playing even more difficult than it already is.

24

Yes, lots of righteous things here that we should do. Think the original post was candidly implying that we can't be bothered or that some of those things are folly.

How about tucking a cigarette into the strings on the headstock? Let's try and revive that

25

...thats a joke BTW. Anyone else find the tip of their tongue gets dry whilst playing guitar?


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