Miscellaneous Rumbles

Getting to old for concerts

26

Didja get to catch any of the (3/4’s of) Utopia reunion tour?

– tubwompus

Yes, I did...and I really enjoyed it. I did the whole Meet 'n Greet Experience thing. My show happened to fall in mid-tour, and as luck would have it, both Todd and Gil (the keyboard player who took Ralph;s place at the last minute) were ill....Todd's voice was shot due to the cold...but I still really enjoyed seeing the guys together again.

I've probably been to 70 or 80 Todd and Utopia shows in my life...I used to see the same show on the tour in two or three different cities! The first time I met Todd was in the mid-70's...I've spoken to him after shows five different times...and sat in the front row of many a show.

I would not have missed the Utopia reunion for pretty much anything.

27

I can't stand huge crowds of people anymore. Due to the distance and time involved this is me lately:

28

Andy Timmons? Hey Ruger, Andy is from my hometown and recently his mother was ill so he came back for a bit and while he was here, he played several nights at a 50 seat venue that I should have made time to go see but didn't.

As far as big venues go, I am going to see Peter Frampton and Steve Miller tonight at our large venue. Luckily, my workplace has a suite up high with nice seating that I get to enjoy the show from. It's the first show of their summer tour. I'm pumped.

I'm 54 and about 5-10 % grey but there's a lot less trees in the forest, if you catch my drift? I still let my hair hang down, occasionally. It was easier last year when I was in a band with a bunch of 30 somethings. They kept me on top of new music that I hadn't considered and broadened my horizons, when it comes to music. I was amazed that they wanted to play along with this old dude. I can't stand on the floor in front of the stage for an entire show anymore, well I guess I could but I won't.

29

I found out I was too old a couple of years back when I went to that Ted Nugent noise fest. Most painful experience I have had in a long time.

Never again.

30

You don't strike me as a Nugent sort of guy, Richard.

31

I caught DEVO at The Wiltern a couple years back, thats as "Arena Rock" as I get nowadays.

For Me,Nothing beats a sh*tty little Dive bar for Live music.

32

I can't help this , can someone correct the title of this thread to 'too' old for concerts. I get the concept though I think almost 40 is hardly 'old' I'd love to be that 'old' again. Giant concerts are generally a long expensive crowded lineup to disappointment.

33

I can't help this , can someone correct the title of this thread to 'too' old for concerts. I get the concept though I think almost 40 is hardly 'old' I'd love to be that 'old' again. Giant concerts are generally a long expensive crowded lineup to disappointment.

– Toxophilite

Just be happy that you made it TO old.

34

Some of my more memorable meet and greets were completely spontaneous and took place during the period where I was a backstage worker in and around the three local concert venues.

From the late 60's through the mid 70's I was kind of the "kid" in the backstage crowd, but I always had my guitar handy (kept behind the couch in the Green Room) and as a result was able to practice during the rare breaks that came along during setup. As a result, some of the folks coming through town noticed the kid in the corner, strumming (usually) one of their songs and often sat down to talk with me on their own.

I learned the "Folsom Prison Blues" solo from Bob Wootten, my chord chart (since lost in a move) for "Reuben James" was written out for me -and signed- by Kenny Rogers and his then guitarist Mike Settle, and the Irish Rovers taught me how to use the upper pairs of strings on my 12-string as a faux mandolin and more. It was one of the Rovers who suggested I switch to a lighter pick if I wanted to be a 12-string flat-picker so that the mando sound would be easier to achieve. I still use light picks, thanks to Joe.

It wasn't always music- I learned most of Peter Reveen's (Reveen- the Impossibilist!) secrets before my 16th birthday, and I also learned first hand of the sheer grit and determination it takes to be among the top ballet artists or ice skaters in the world.

There's more, lots of it, but it's not the point. As I get inevitably older, I seem to be thinking more and more of those days, much of which ended a lot of years ago (the theatre chain here in town unionized just after my 17th birthday and I was too young to sign on with IATSE, thus pretty much ending my free pass to the backstage as well as my part-time job), and in those years things like selfies were completely unheard of. So there are very few visual records. But those encounters, spontaneous though they were, are among some of the fondest memories of my music life.

35

It wasn't always music- I learned most of Peter Reveen's (Reveen- the Impossibilist!) secrets before my 16th birthday

It's a small memory, from much later in my life, but in the sense of closing open circles, it was immensely satisfying for me to hear from John Sebastian during a casual conversation the complete story behind "Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind," including the true identities of the girls, the impact they had on him, and the situation which inspired the song.

It was a song I remember hearing from the transistor radio mounted to the handlebars of my Huffy bike (no Schwinns for this poor boy) while delivering papers in the pre-dawn hours. I was of an early adolescent age, in a time when pop songs provided a glimpse into what a kid could only think was the more mature world of experience to come.

I may have taken the song more seriously than the Spoonful meant it. Certainly Sebastian didn't seem to have been traumatized by his confrontation with the girls' father; on the other hand, 50 years later his memory of the situation and descriptions of the girls were quite vivid.

More even than meeting the artist, connecting with the real story behind a song that had great impact is ... enriching or something.

36

You don't strike me as a Nugent sort of guy, Richard.

– Proteus

Come to find out, I wasn't.

37

Some of my more memorable meet and greets were completely spontaneous and took place during the period where I was a backstage worker in and around the three local concert venues.

From the late 60's through the mid 70's I was kind of the "kid" in the backstage crowd, but I always had my guitar handy (kept behind the couch in the Green Room) and as a result was able to practice during the rare breaks that came along during setup. As a result, some of the folks coming through town noticed the kid in the corner, strumming (usually) one of their songs and often sat down to talk with me on their own.

I learned the "Folsom Prison Blues" solo from Bob Wootten, my chord chart (since lost in a move) for "Reuben James" was written out for me -and signed- by Kenny Rogers and his then guitarist Mike Settle, and the Irish Rovers taught me how to use the upper pairs of strings on my 12-string as a faux mandolin and more. It was one of the Rovers who suggested I switch to a lighter pick if I wanted to be a 12-string flat-picker so that the mando sound would be easier to achieve. I still use light picks, thanks to Joe.

It wasn't always music- I learned most of Peter Reveen's (Reveen- the Impossibilist!) secrets before my 16th birthday, and I also learned first hand of the sheer grit and determination it takes to be among the top ballet artists or ice skaters in the world.

There's more, lots of it, but it's not the point. As I get inevitably older, I seem to be thinking more and more of those days, much of which ended a lot of years ago (the theatre chain here in town unionized just after my 17th birthday and I was too young to sign on with IATSE, thus pretty much ending my free pass to the backstage as well as my part-time job), and in those years things like selfies were completely unheard of. So there are very few visual records. But those encounters, spontaneous though they were, are among some of the fondest memories of my music life.

– Kevin Frye

You and my boy Proteus need to put these cool memories down on Paper. Im sure many people find this stuff very interesting.


BTW, Ive been on this thing for many years now and still dont know how to Multi Quote.

38

Not one for enormous venues, they tend to disappoint. My ears rang for 3 or 4 days after seeing Springsteen at the LA Sports Arena in '84, saw Zeppelin at the Inglewood (Fabulous) Forum in, I believe '78, and I think I saw Cat Stevens there in '76 or so. The Forum may have been fabulous, but the Zep show, not so much. Yes, I'm quite old.

One show at a venue that got really big really fast was this one in April. The bill was pretty impressive, too (Mitch Polzak, Buzz Campbell, Duane Eddy, Jerry Lee Lewis, and the Stray Cats). I would go to a show like this again. And again. And again.

39

We're playing here this summer, and last I heard we are to supply our own PA. I have concerns.

40

We're playing here this summer, and last I heard we are to supply our own PA. I have concerns.

– giffenf

Looks like another great nite of "Concerts in the Park".

I'll be at my local one this Friday nite.

41

We're playing here this summer, and last I heard we are to supply our own PA. I have concerns.

– giffenf

If you've got to supply a PA for that big of a venue, as well as play, they're not paying you enough. Hauling and setting up a PA rig (and tearing it down) is more than an 8 hour day's work in itself. Having to rent that much gear would be crazy.

42

I'm hoping it's mis-read in the contract on the part of our bandleader, but I haven't seen the contract. Since there's an opening act for us, I suspect it will have been handled, but of course I'll find out for sure. What little I can see here does not look like the kind of setup the average band carts into (and out of) a club gig. I've got a pretty hefty PA system, but I'm not sure it would handle a venue this size without a little (or a lot of) reinforcement.

43

We're playing here this summer, and last I heard we are to supply our own PA. I have concerns.

– giffenf

Seems a little hinky to me. Very few bands carry the kind of sound system that would be appropriate for a venue that size. Renting one to handle an outdoor venue that size would likely run the renter in excess of a grand and half, methinx, plus as Slim noted, a day's worth of work to set it up and fine tune it.

A careful reading of the offer is in order, for sure.

44

I was lucky in my younger years to live in the greater LA area and have parents who let me go to amazing shows in my youth. The "Rose Palace" in Pasadena is where they worked on the Rose Parade floats around Parade time. In the off-season, (which was most of the time), it was a Concert Venue for a few years. I saw Jethro Tull's first tour, Zepplin, Grateful Dead with PigPen, John Mayall, Ike and Tina , Lee Michaels, Alice Cooper, Spirit and Spencer Davis and Santana there just to name a few. Saw quite a few shows at the Forum and the Hollywood Bowl back in the day as well. We were young, , and didn't mind a bit, Nowadays, I prefer comfort and valet parking, and a nice meal if its available, Hollywood Bowl is a great venue still to this day, very accommodating.

45

Seems a little hinky to me. Very few bands carry the kind of sound system that would be appropriate for a venue that size. Renting one to handle an outdoor venue that size would likely run the renter in excess of a grand and half, methinx, plus as Slim noted, a day's worth of work to set it up and fine tune it.

A careful reading of the offer is in order, for sure.

– Kevin Frye

Looking at the rig that's in the picture, your figure of $1500 isn't anywhere near enough. That money wouldn't cover the crew needed to set up, tear down, and move the gear, as well as operate it for the gig, but it might cover the roadies' food bill for the day. I spent decades setting up large scale PA and lighting rigs. Gear rents out for about 2% of it's cost, and labor and transport is on top of that. Then, there's the problem of AC power. I hope the promoters have this covered because you stand to lose a lot. Read the contract thoroughly.

46

My next 3 shows:

Samantha Fish, local bar
Victor Wainwright, same local bar
Dan Baird & Homemade Sin, small theatre (about the size of a large club, not a huge theatre like Setzer plays). It's an 1:10 drive one-way, but it's AWAY from the population, into the country, so it's a very nice, relaxing drive.... no traffic, no parking issues, etc.

47
  1. The sound man can make or break a show, eh? I'm sure arena-size PA's have a mixer and volume. They should learn how to use them.

  2. Inconsiderate people can ruin a show. Recently, stoned middle agers in the row behind me talked and giggled their way through the whole night.

I still seek out great opportunities to see live music. Rant over.

48

Speaking of volume, Karen and I are long-time IMAX passholders. About 14 months ago, the local Nat-Geo IMAX finally finished upgrading to full digital, which included a massive uptick to the sound system (already 30,000W according to their little spiel). It was loud, but comfortable and Karen, who at "over 50" still has quite sensitive hearing, was able to enjoy IMAX presentations sans hearing protection.

Then came the upgrade. We had an invite to a wine and cheese and demo of the new system. The picture was incrementaly better, but what the fellow from IMAX HQ was most proud of was the new sound system. While he declined to mention the actual wattage, he did say that the digital sound is now " clearer", which allowed them to respond to demand for louder sound with almost no distortion. After his presentation, I approached him and asked why they felt the need to respond to the demand for more volume. He said it was simply a matter of responding to customer input and that was that. He added that it allowed the Nat geo IMAX to be on a more level footing with the commercial chains when running First Run movies, most of which are incredibly loud (rock concert levels around here).

Sigh..

(Do we really need to hear the sound of 50,000 Monarch butterflies, babbling brooks and frolicking penguins at ear-piercing levels?)

We've been to a dozen shows since the upgrade and Karen now uses her in-ear hearing protectors to avoid migraines.


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