Miscellaneous Rumbles

? For Appliance Guys

1

OK, a short prelude. I come from a long line of DIY's. From Granddad and Dad I inherited the skills necessary to fix dang near anything, which has served me well these six plus decades. However, with modern industrial throw away products one gets these days it can be a real PITA to fix. Latest case in point is my washing machine I've had for maybe 8 years.No major problems till three days ago. Pump would not drain. I did replace pump 6 months ago when somehow a quarter got lodged in the impeller, destroying it.Easy fix, replaced pump. This time I track it to the control panel, likely a relay which I could fix except they covered the whole thing in epoxy , making it impossible. I look up the part number and grumble about shelling out $100 for what should have been a $5 fix, except they no longer manufacture the part. Two days shot trying to locate one, but apparently it's all JIT direct from factory, no has it. So a perfectly good otherwise washer is now headed for the landfill.Our first washer we bought in 1983, a good ole made in USA Maytag, back when they built 'em like tanks. 25+ years of hard service, one mechanical switch repair the entire time. From what I read and anecdotal evidence I get seems to indicate that eight years is considered good by today's standards.So today my wife picks out the same updated version of what just went belly up, I figure what the hey, they're all pretty much POS from all the reviews I get, why not. So I got to thinking,hmmm, maybe I should salvage things like pumps, motors and such from the old machine before they haul it away on the off chance that I may be able with a little creativity use it for future repairs with the new one. I checked a few parts online old to new, and the numbers are close ,but not the same. On schematic they look the same.I wonder how much these manufacturers reinvent wheel each go round, or are they pretty much the same with different bolt patterns and so forth.So, my question to this long winded diatribe, is it worth it to squirrel away this stuff or am I wasting my time? I know, maybe not best asking guitar geeks on a gitar forum, but hey, I get surprised here all the time on the depth of knowledge found inside this here site.

2

If you've got place to store it, I say go for it but my wife always says "What are you going to do with that? You think you'll ever use it? " So My garage sits filled with odds and ends and my starter goes out on my car. I go to the garage and guess what? I actually have the brushes in stock to rebuild it. Viola! I still bring up that story every time she asks why I'm keeping something.

3

In Germany you can't find exactly the same machines in two different shops of different companies.The reason is:you should not get the chance, to compare the machines in prices and comfort. So they have all something different in every model. The barrels of washmashines are thinner and mostly don't last longer than the guarantee.Even the electronic parts.You should produce more trash , to guarantee them their profit.

4

Ha Voodoo, and that's what sticks in my craw, just on a fundamental level it's so wrong. One of humanity's big problems,IMO,is not lack of work, but lack of meaningful work. As much drudgery as it must have been for the people who built the machine that lasted over two decades to have done, I can't help but to think that the satisfaction of having done it right must have went a long way making their corner of the universe seem a little more sane. Suprdave, we have the same mindset. I got boxes of stuff saved up that I find useful things all the time. Case in point, my refrigerator's icemaker used to breakdown every six months or so. It was under warranty for the first year, and they replaced the entire ice unit, not the bit that kept breaking. I kept the old parts, figured out what was causing the first problem, which went away. Recently another plastic part gave out, and in my box I had two of what I needed.I have a shop I work out of, as long as it doesn't get in the way and I have room, I'll store it.

5

Well, you're unlikely to be able to use much of your "parts washer" XX years from now when your new washer needs repair.

I'd recommend buying a top loading Speed Queen washer. Heavy duty, essentially what you'll find in a laundromat. It even has an old-school knob that makes a gravelly, crunching noise as you rotate it to select a wash cycle. Parts should be available for a good long time.

Something like this: Link

6

I've worked for an appliance maker for 26 yrs. Sadly, none of their business practices surprises me anymore.

7

Planned obscelesence. All they need to do is change something minor, and then it's "New & Improved!", then they can raise the price.

It's pretty much like going to PCBs instead of hand wiring amps. It's far easier, monkeys can assemble it, and when it dies, you have to buy a new one because the old one is not capable of being repaired.

Appliance repairmen are about as trustworthy as used car salesmen. 60 Minutes showed many of the scams. Trust no one, and watch them while they "fix" your stuff.

8

I used to work for an appliance parts store for about 7 years... sadly I saw this problem all the time. One small part would become "unavailable" and so a whole appliance would be trashed. On the other hand some people would find any excuse to not repair an item and just go buy a new one. It all depends.

I do remember control panels being priced much higher than you mentioned, almost ridiculously priced. There was this one guy once who was able to repair his control board but I don't remember how

9

OK, a short prelude. I come from a long line of DIY's. From Granddad and Dad I inherited the skills necessary to fix dang near anything, which has served me well these six plus decades. However, with modern industrial throw away products one gets these days it can be a real PITA to fix. Latest case in point is my washing machine I've had for maybe 8 years.No major problems till three days ago. Pump would not drain. I did replace pump 6 months ago when somehow a quarter got lodged in the impeller, destroying it.Easy fix, replaced pump. This time I track it to the control panel, likely a relay which I could fix except they covered the whole thing in epoxy , making it impossible. I look up the part number and grumble about shelling out $100 for what should have been a $5 fix, except they no longer manufacture the part. Two days shot trying to locate one, but apparently it's all JIT direct from factory, no has it. So a perfectly good otherwise washer is now headed for the landfill.Our first washer we bought in 1983, a good ole made in USA Maytag, back when they built 'em like tanks. 25+ years of hard service, one mechanical switch repair the entire time. From what I read and anecdotal evidence I get seems to indicate that eight years is considered good by today's standards.So today my wife picks out the same updated version of what just went belly up, I figure what the hey, they're all pretty much POS from all the reviews I get, why not. So I got to thinking,hmmm, maybe I should salvage things like pumps, motors and such from the old machine before they haul it away on the off chance that I may be able with a little creativity use it for future repairs with the new one. I checked a few parts online old to new, and the numbers are close ,but not the same. On schematic they look the same.I wonder how much these manufacturers reinvent wheel each go round, or are they pretty much the same with different bolt patterns and so forth.So, my question to this long winded diatribe, is it worth it to squirrel away this stuff or am I wasting my time? I know, maybe not best asking guitar geeks on a gitar forum, but hey, I get surprised here all the time on the depth of knowledge found inside this here site.

– Opie

I learned new,washing machines are designed to last only 5 yrs....i just dumped a 5 year old machine because of this fact...and it suddenly became a money pit.

10

Well, you're unlikely to be able to use much of your "parts washer" XX years from now when your new washer needs repair.

I'd recommend buying a top loading Speed Queen washer. Heavy duty, essentially what you'll find in a laundromat. It even has an old-school knob that makes a gravelly, crunching noise as you rotate it to select a wash cycle. Parts should be available for a good long time.

Something like this: Link

– geoguy

Aww shoot, wish I'd known about that one before the missus bought the new one. Old school, three knobs, no touch screen button BS. Will definitely keep that one in mind five years down the road when the new one goes belly up. I can't help but notice the five year life span corresponds exactly to the overpriced protection plan they always offer. I always try not to sound overly sarcastic when I say no, never works.

11

Just saw this on our local Craigslist, kinda tickled my funnybone as it shows just how helpless modern man has become , apparently.Link

12

"Durable goods" is the economic term and they only last for seven years. Total bs. Find an old Maytag, make sure it has all analog parts -- no digital displays and stay away from cheap plastic parts -- and it will last forever.Talked with an old repair guy about why some newer Briggs & Stratton engines were junk and he said they were trying to keep the cost down to compete in the market place. Marketplace is full of ignorant people who adhere to the bottom price line instead of investing for the future. Don't get me started on junk appliances at Costco. I've got a 1938 Wedgewood gas stove converted for propane use; works fine. I'd drive a car made before 1970 if I could figure out how to put an airbag in it. And get off my lawn.

13

They don't make 'em like they used to.

14

I'm not the "Greenest" guy around, but I think these non -serviceable pieces of junk are a waste of energy and resources all the way around.

15

I recently repaired my washing machine, it wouldnt drain so I opened it up and found the strainer packed with corroded pennies , rubber bands and assorted other stuff you find in pants pockets. Put it all together and the problem was the same. I tore it all apart again and this time found the pump had sheared the shaft, so it spun but the empeller just sat there. I couldnt find the part anywhere and finally tracked one down for $150 bucks, and now the machine works like new.(knock wood)

A few months ago my $2000 refrigerator stopped cooling. Once again the hunt for parts was on, I finally replaced a circuit board for $175 and waited a week to get it. (I knew it was the circuit board because it was melted) BTW, the fridge has 3 circuit boards,,WTF.

I had a very hard time locating the parts so I suggest you save whatever possible parts you can cannibalize from your old appliances as you never know what could be busted. Parts sure as hell arent available or cheap.


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