Miscellaneous Rumbles

Dyna Discussion

26

I really, really tried to love Dynas but that love never came. For all the reasons that are mentioned in this thread already as well as the reasons Chet Atkins once stated.

Don't get me wrong I don't press the skip button when Brian Setzer grabs the Silver Jet. It sounds great. In fact that's the reason I wanted to give Dynas a go.

Lack of bass with Filters? Really? I can summon the god of thunder out of mine. (TV Classics btw)

– Ratrod

To my ears Dynasonics produce a much more clearly defined bass twang than my TV Jones Classics ever could. Specifically the neck pickup. When I say low end twang I don't mean the classic brittle thin picking notes down by the bridge type of twang, the Classics nail that just fine, what I mean is the punchy, clear, defined, low end twang, or bite. The TVJ Classic just couldn't cut it, it sounded muddy compared to the sound I was going for. Now I'm NOT saying TVJs are muddy though.

I remember when I first got my 6120RHH I brought it to practice and on a few of the songs that I play only the neck pickup my bass player commented that he loved the new guitar but it lacked the balls that my other one did (5129 with a Dynasonic in the neck and a Classic in the bridge) I told him it was missing that nice low end twang from the Dynasonic. He realized that was it.

– MacSteven XIII

I really, really tried to love Dynas but that love never came. For all the reasons that are mentioned in this thread already as well as the reasons Chet Atkins once stated.

Don't get me wrong I don't press the skip button when Brian Setzer grabs the Silver Jet. It sounds great. In fact that's the reason I wanted to give Dynas a go.

Lack of bass with Filters? Really? I can summon the god of thunder out of mine. (TV Classics btw)

– Ratrod

To my ears Dynasonics produce a much more clearly defined bass twang than my TV Jones Classics ever could. Specifically the neck pickup. When I say low end twang I don't mean the classic brittle thin picking notes down by the bridge type of twang, the Classics nail that just fine, what I mean is the punchy, clear, defined, low end twang, or bite. The TVJ Classic just couldn't cut it, it sounded muddy compared to the sound I was going for. Now I'm NOT saying TVJs are muddy though.

I remember when I first got my 6120RHH I brought it to practice and on a few of the songs that I play only the neck pickup my bass player commented that he loved the new guitar but it lacked the balls that my other one did (5129 with a Dynasonic in the neck and a Classic in the bridge) I told him it was missing that nice low end twang from the Dynasonic. He realized that was it.

– MacStevenXIII

I'm hearing the same thing as you Mac. The well defined bassy twangy low end is almost there with the TVJ classics which causes me to dig in harder to pull it out which causes the tone to go mushy. :|

27

I'm finding Dynasonics to be the best sounding and most versatile single coil pickup I've ever experienced. It's very important to adjust the poles to achieve their full potential. If the poles are too low they sound weak and if the poles are too high they sound too compressed and start distorting. The sweet spot for the poles is the area right before they start distorting. The tone knob plays an important part in their versatility. If I turn the knob down almost all of the way I can get great P90 style tones, if I turn it more towards the middle it is more in the Strat or Tele realm but with the signature Dyna fatness and if the tone is all the way up it delivers all of the Gretsch chime but still retains the full mids and lows. The tone knob on my Duo Jet seems to mostly act as a treble adjustment knob because the mids and lows are not affected as much which is perfect. Every area in the tone sweep sounds good. There are no mud and no icepicky sounds at either end of the spectrum. Having both pickups on is my favorite tone. I love having this many tonal options coming out of a simple setup.

– BuddyHollywood

I'm finding Dynasonics to be the best sounding and most versatile single coil pickup I've ever experienced. It's very important to adjust the poles to achieve their full potential. If the poles are too low they sound weak and if the poles are too high they sound too compressed and start distorting. The sweet spot for the poles is the area right before they start distorting. The tone knob plays an important part in their versatility. If I turn the knob down almost all of the way I can get great P90 style tones, if I turn it more towards the middle it is more in the Strat or Tele realm but with the signature Dyna fatness and if the tone is all the way up it delivers all of the Gretsch chime but still retains the full mids and lows. The tone knob on my Duo Jet seems to mostly act as a treble adjustment knob because the mids and lows are not affected as much which is perfect. Every area in the tone sweep sounds good. There are no mud and no icepicky sounds at either end of the spectrum. Having both pickups on is my favorite tone. I love having this many tonal options coming out of a simple setup.

– BuddyHollywood

This.

I have come to the conclusion (as a deaf old guy with a lot of high-end roll off - if y'know-what-I-mean?) that most humbucker designs lack a certain liveliness I must have in order to be happy.

Not that there are not great humbuckers out there: I've had plenty, and do like Filtertrons, PAF's, and some other "not-too-hotly-wound" versions, especially if the coils are not so matched that they lose a lot of the high end sheen (AKA a little single coil sound is present).

It depends on the guitar for me: as to whether or not Dyna's will really turn me on. I thought my 6120DSW w FMIC Dyna's was about perfect. My CC is close, but I'm pining for a current 6120DE I think at this point.

The neck pu on the CC is great. BOTH Dyna's in all switch settings were great on my DSW.

Just sayin'.

28

Haven't read through this thread due to lack of time, but here goes:

For me, it's really about the sound. Brilliant sparkle and rich mids and lows. Don't get me wrong, I love Filters for the growl and grit. But dynas have that special something that you can't get elsewhere as far as I know. Clean tones are off the charts. When you really crank the volume they get a little wild and wooly and that sure is fine too. And the bridge pup on my '56 is the business.

29

I have 2000s and I think those sound very nice for picking. They have a very fast and dynamic response and very good per string definition in chords. I do find them rather fizzy for distortion. They could have more mids, so I'm gonna try dynas soon.

The Gbuckers I have, are very dark and muddy, but they sound friendlier when distorted. More gnarly and less fizzy. They become really great when you place them in a solid body. My local luthier showed me this and he likes them better than any other buckers.

When I turn down the treble on the amp, the jazz tone from the 2000s is way faster, dryer and beautiful than when I use the Gbuckers on a more trebly amp setting.

I did try a pro filter guitar and I like that sound too: the kereng on half distorted chords is very nice.

Somehow it seems pro bodies can make humbuckers sound better. The electros do not seem to be less with dynas or 2000s: works about the same.

I'd say humbuckers for distortion and for extra tracks, single coils for picking and clean frontman stuff.

30

Curt said: "So is the attraction looks, history, people that play or have played them, I'm curious?"

For me it was Billy Zoom's sound that made me like Dynas. Always loved it.

Conversely, Pete Townshend's sound makes me like Filters.

So I'm an all around Gretsch lover because of that.

31

Geoff Vane - "The Gbuckers I have, are very dark and muddy, but they sound friendlier when distorted. More gnarly and less fizzy. They become really great when you place them in a solid body. My local luthier showed me this and he likes them better than any other buckers."

I agree! I love the Gretschbuckers in a solid body. The reason they may sound muddy in a 5120 is the same reason they work so well in a solid body. They are tone fattening pickups. Strong string definition is easier to achieve in a solid body than in a hollowbody. Gretschbuckers are the most misunderstood, misused and underrated pickups on the planet.

32

I just can't get into any kind of double coil pickup any more, much prefer single coils.

Curt, this is a vintage Dyna lead pickup on an old Guild Starfire into a (promotor provided) Bassman reissue - too thin for you?

live clip

33

And another live clip, into a 2X10 tweed Deluxe clone : Dyna lead pickup

I was thinking, your amp is pretty much a blackface Princeton with 6L6's, no? Not that crazy about my Dynasonics into my blackface Super Reverb, but I love them into the normal channel of my tweeds. Maybe you'd like them too in an amp that's a little less bright?

34

Walter, I always think of your tone when someone starts talking Dynas. That's a great sounding guitar & your style compliments it.

35

Walter thanks, no not thin at all and two completely different mixes for sure. I do think the Dyna's have more bite which helps them cut through very well.

My favorite amps are a 65 BF Deluxe no verb and the BF Princeton HP that Josh built. Maybe that's where my issue lies and maybe I need to plug in elsewhere. Thanks again for the clips.

36

Mac, the T'Armond's will fit in the Filter hole and if it's trestle braced the screws fit on the inside corners. If it's not trestle braced you could attach a small piece of wood under the top.

– Curt

Yeah, I saw the T'Armond install that Tavo did and he mentioned it was a pain in the ass even though they fit in fine. My 6118T-LTV is trestle braced and I was all set to drop one in but figured I'd just wait since TV is promising to have the filter mount version out in the coming months.

– MacSteven XIII

Mac, the T'Armond's will fit in the Filter hole and if it's trestle braced the screws fit on the inside corners. If it's not trestle braced you could attach a small piece of wood under the top.

– Curt

Yeah, I saw the T'Armond install that Tavo did and he mentioned it was a pain in the ass even though they fit in fine. My 6118T-LTV is trestle braced and I was all set to drop one in but figured I'd just wait since TV is promising to have the filter mount version out in the coming months.

– MacStevenXIII

These were Filter holes, pretty easy install it's just the extra holes for the Filter surrounds that you need to deal with.

37

I've always had filtertron equiped hollowbodies. Whenever I tried dynas or hilos in hollowbody Gretsch guitars I was never as satisfied.

I bought a Silver Jet last week as a backup to my 6120. I figured seeing that I was getting a "solid" body I might as well go full out and get the complete opposite and opt for a model with dynas.

I'm hooked. This guitar sounds fantastic and with delay effects they sound even better. There's an early Chet and Cliff Gallup tone that I can get close with my filtertrons but this really nails it. I'm hearing that low end ballsy sound out of this guitar that Macsteven is referencing to in his above post.

38

curt every time I use my silver jet and step on the overdrive pedal the guitar squeals and all I can do is smile

love those dynas

39

The Dyna's provide this nice deep, bouncy twang that I'm not able to get from anything else. They've got growl on the bridge and a singing tone in the neck. It's hard to describe a sound you hear in your head. I love the tone of the opening riff of "Beyond and Back" from Wild Gift. Thats the sound I'm talking about.

40

It really depends on what version of the Dynasonic.

I do not care for the 'space' version that you find on the present Gretsch collection and that came as standard on my Duo Jet DSV 'Cat Man' reissue. I replaced those with SD's which is far closer to a vintage DeArmond Dyna.

For me the vintage Dynasonics are an incredible pickup.

I have them on both a vintage 'Chet' jet and 6120 model. I find that they have a clarity to them that a Filtertron cannot get to. The dynamic low end of the pickup has already been mentioned here but there is also an accompanying high end that is extemely tuneful & joyous. When picking double notes or triads on the treble strings e.g. a wonderful shimmering quality can be generated. I would recommend Paul Yandell's sublime guitar solo on the Louvin Bros. 'Your Running Wild' as an example of what I mean.

Not only are they a delight when playing clean but they can also very aggressive in their attack. They sound absolutely 'correct' with a decent overdrive pedal, meshed up but yet still retaining their definition. For rhythmic work they just chime.

Yours

Drew

42

T-armonds are the answer to the filtertron gretsch player that absolutely hates the thin, clanky, microphonic reissue dynas(there's even some honk in em). Gretsch needs to make the switch.

tell me these T-armonds dont sound full, bouncy and twangy!

here is a sugarpine tele, rosewood neck, steel saddles, steel bridge using a canare GS6 cable going into a drive pedal set fairly transparent (it has a tad of compression and grit going) with a george L cable going over to the amp (the canare emphasizes the low mids, the george L hi-lites the upper mids clarity..together they rule).

the amp is going to a bassman cab with 2 celestion vintage 30 in parallel with 12gauge harness.

https://www.facebook.com/ph...

43

I own the Dynas Seymour Duncan custom shop over the BZJet and they are great, full bouncy and twangy... :) also i own a James Trussart with TV Jones Classic Plus they are different that´s all i can said and for different usage purpose, but no one is better than other it is like to compare Apples with Oranges, also keep in mind some amps prefer single coils other sound better with Hum-Buckers, in my humble opinion

Dynas are Bright Aggressive and cut like a knife in a mix Filtertones are Dark Fat and Powerful also more difficult to make shine in a mix I guess Marshall amps must to work very well with Filtertones Pick up´s and i have never tested a Filtertones pick up´s in a Marshall, but Marshalls love Humb-Buckers, i can´t imagine a better amp for a Gibson Les Paul than a Marshall

44

I should have mentioned that I've had both stock Dynas and T'Armonds. STock dynas were fine but the bridge was thin and neck boomy. T'ARmonds are fantastic, much better balanced. Nice bitey bridge and smooth neck.

45

So what I'm hearing here is that the two types of pickup have different timbre. We have alto and tenor saxes. I don't want to hear Coltrane take every solo on "All Blues". I want to hear Cannonball as well. I own a guitar with SD59s, one with filters, and a strat. Just like I own a 6L6 amp, and an EL84 amp. Variety is the spice of life. :)

46

Thanks, all this helps and I've ordered a set of T'Armonds to put in one of the '62's.

Real PAF FilterTrons Can be setup to be as bright as any Dyna I've played and have a lot more low end. I do hear a snap with the Dyna that can't be reproduced with a FilterTron so it'll be interesting to A/B. I have two '62 Counrty Clubs and I have one original set of everything and one that's just a husk. They are only a few numbers away so my plan is to make one with T's and one with F's.

47

As a rockabilly/country player, I've never run across a humbucker that I could get "my" sound out of. I've played peoples' guitars with many different kinds, including TV Classics that I had in a Pro Jet and none of them do it for me. I could probably get by with one in the neck position, but the bridge position is the big hang-up for me. I really want to be able to get that snappy in-your-face deep growl on the low E string, and that's where single coils really deliver for me. I have played some humbucker equipped guitars that I really liked, but so far I've never found one that could give me everything I wanted out of it.

– aaronbrill

Thanks aaronbrill for doing all of the typing for me as I could not have said it better.

I will agree that of all humbucker pickups, the Filter'Trons win hands down, but they still don't have the snap and brilliance that I need. My 6120DC was close but I think the standard Filters would have pleased me more than the TV Classics that were on it.

The Gretsch guitars I've played with stock filters seem to shimmer more than TVs and I think it is because TVs are wound to have a stronger midrange which is exactly what I don't want.

I would love to try a set of TV's Magna'Trons to see how they sound to my ear. After all, it is our ear we're trying to please and we all hear and see things differently. This is a great thread, Curt.

One last thing, 99.9% of my playing is clean and I actually prefer the DeArmond 2000s over the Dynas. I find the 2000s to be smoother but still retain all the brightness of a Dyna. I'm having Paul Setzer make me some bases and they are going on to my 5120.

48

Curt, it's down to the sonic character of the pickup, and you shouldn't wear yourself out trying to analyze it if it doesn't strike you. We don't all have to have the same ear, and Dynas seem to be a lovem-or-hatem affair.

I don't think about whether the Dynasonic is versatile, or whether it will get creamy and smooth with distortion, or whether it does a good job where I would normally have used another pickup.

What I know is that Dynasonics have their own character, clear or dirty (but especially clean) which we've all tried to describe - but which I haven't heard in other pickups.

Other pickups - 'buckers, Strat, P90s - fitted naturally into my playing, whatever gain or effect or style I was pursuing. Of course some worked better for some things, others for others...but I could push them around. Tweak here and tweak there, and we adapted to each other easily.

Dynas sounded so different to me when I first tried them that I had to figure out how to play them - but I knew I wanted to. They didn't meet me halfway; I had to go there. Rather than adapting the Dynasonic to my playing, I've tailored my playing – good or bad – to Dynasonics.

Again, why? I don't know. Maybe a good spectragraph analysis would tell me, because it has to be in its sonic signature. Articulation, a distinct texture, I don't know - there's just something in there I can't get enough of.

49

Proteus, do you recommend different metal tru-arcs for different pups? I've got an AL120 on my TRose. But I'm upgrading the pups either to Classics or T-Armonds. Do Dynas get too plinky with aluminum? If I go that route, will I do better switching to a stainless bridge?

50

You know, strum, I should do the science on that and post clips. Been awhile since I did any comparos. And I don't think I've mated aluminum with Dynas since roadjunkie and I tried the very first Tru-Arc on his DSW. I certainly don't recall that sounding too plinky – the tone caught all of us off-guard and we said "whoa!" (in a good way).

Duane tested all four metals extensively when he was deciding – like for weeks/months at a time per metal, to really shake them out. And he said aluminum was "too twangy" for him. (Which you gotta love - but then when you have the twang built into your hands, you don't need to optimize it.)

He chose stainless, of course, and sounds huge with it. But I also heard him (at Deke's Guitar Geek Fest in 2010) with copper and Dynas, and I thought that had a rich, throaty punch.

You can always try your AL-120 when you get the T-Armonds and see.

Meantime, I'll aim at shooting them out.


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